Tate Modern unveils major acquisition by South Korea’s Haegue Yang

Haegue Yang Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times, Split in Three 2015 © Haegue Yang. Tate, Purchased with funds provided by the Asia Pacific Acquisitions Committee and Kyung-soo Huh, Sung-Moon Kwon, Tae Won Hahn and Byucksan Foundation 2018

LONDON – Tate Modern has unveiled a major new acquisition by South Korean artist Haegue Yang. Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times Split in Three 2015, consists of over 500 Venetian blinds suspended dramatically from the ceiling. Yang exploits the unique sculptural possibilities of these ordinary window coverings, allowing the play of light to change as viewers move around, through and under the expansive structure. It is one of many new free displays opening at Tate Modern this winter.

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Clarke’s Jan. 13 auction runs gamut from Picasso to Pontiac

Leading the fine art section is this Afro (Italian, 1912-1976) watercolor collage, Stagione a Procida, signed and dated 1957. Estimate: $15,000-$20,000

LARCHMONT, N.Y. — A wide-ranging auction will kick off the new year at Clarke Auction Gallery on Sunday, Jan. 13, at 10 a.m., with absentee and Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. The sale’s comprehensive offering includes Oriental carpets, lighting, bronzes, midcentury modern design, American and Continental furniture; sterling silver, designer jewelry and accessories.

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Shutdown to close DC museums including Smithsonian by midweek

A view of the National Museum of Natural History from the Washington Monument. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
A view of the National Museum of Natural History from the Washington Monument. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
A view of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History from the Washington Monument. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

WASHINGTON (AP) – Museums and galleries popular with visitors and locals in the nation’s capital will close starting midweek if the partial shutdown of the federal government drags on. So will the National Zoo and a lively ice rink near the National Mall.

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Tiffany lamps dominate prices realized at Heritage Auctions’ $1.2M sale

Tiffany Studios leaded glass and bronze Peony table lamp, circa 1915. Sold for $93,750. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

DALLAS – Leaded glass and bronze Tiffany lamps led the total sales in Heritage Auctions’ Tiffany, Lalique & Art Glass Including Art Deco & Art Nouveau Auction to $1,295,427 on Nov. 15 in Dallas. The auction achieved sell-through rates of 97.01 percent by value and 95.2 percent by lots sold, and Tiffany lamps claimed six of the top 10 spots in the auction. Absentee and Internet live bidding was available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Ancient Roman glass: techniques for the ages

Large Roman glass bowl with incredible rainbow iridescence and subtle banding around middle and top, circa 1st century AD, 5½” D x 1½” H, provenance: ex Norry Collection, Rochester, New York; acquired in the 1980s, current owner through descent, made $1,300 in 2014, image courtesy of Artemis Gallery and LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK – Natural glass, created through lightening strikes and volcanic eruptions, has been known since ancient times. Manmade glass beads and amulets, however, first surfaced at Mesopotamian and Egyptian archeological sites. Yet Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder ascribes its legendary discovery to Phoenicia, millennia later. As the tale goes, seafarers come ashore, but finding no stones to support their cooking pots, propped them up on lumps of natrium-salt, taken from their cargo. As the natrium heated up and fused with sand on the beach, “streams of an unknown liquid flowed… this was the origin of glass.

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