Worcester Art Museum explores fashion behind baseball jerseys

Wright & Ditson Boston Red Sox uniform shirt worn by Jesse Tannehill, 1908, wool flannel, National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, B-176-61. Courtesy of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum/Milo Stewart Jr.

Wright & Ditson Boston Red Sox uniform shirt worn by Jesse Tannehill, 1908, wool flannel, National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, B-176-61. Courtesy of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum/Milo Stewart Jr.

WORCESTER, Mass. – During the course of 170 years, the baseball jersey has become an iconic emblem of American culture, extending well beyond a sports uniform to inspire fashion trends and serve as a means of everyday, individual self-expression. While the ubiquity of the American baseball shirt is undeniable, there has been little scholarly research on its importance to material and popular culture through time. On June 12, the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) opened The Iconic Jersey: Baseball x Fashion, the first museum exhibition to focus specifically on the design evolution of baseball jerseys and their impact on wider national culture. The show will feature 37 garments, including historic and contemporary jerseys as well as runway looks—from Jesse Tannehill’s 1908 Boston Red Sox Uniform Shirt to MIZIZI’s Black Lives Matter jersey—along with two one-of-a-kind jersey chairs and other ephemera that capture the phenomenon of the baseball shirt, both on and off the field. The exhibition, which will remain on view through September 12, 2021, is accompanied by a scholarly catalog.

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‘Pride in Changing the Game,’ estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

Auction of Pride-themed artwork to benefit LGBTQ+ community

‘Pride in Changing the Game,’ estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

‘Pride in Changing the Game,’ estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

VANCOUVER, B.C., Canada – To celebrate Pride Month this year, Overtime has launched OT Proud and partnered with renowned artist Carling Jackson on a unique artwork that will sell in a single-lot auction on June 30. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Ed Finnell’s concert photos of ’70s rock gods headed to auction

Ed Finnell’s photograph of David Bowie as the Thin White Duke, taken during the 1976 ‘Station to Station’ tour

Ed Finnell’s photograph of David Bowie as the Thin White Duke, taken during the 1976 ‘Station to Station’ tour

STANSTED MOUNTFICHET, UK – Original photographs of Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Robert Plant, and Elton John performing will appear for sale at Sworders next month. The Design auction on July 14 includes a cache of prints taken by music photographer Ed Finnell at legendary gigs held in Los Angeles in the 1970s.

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The art of the garden: ideas for exterior decorating

A monumental bronze Beaux Arts garden fountain sold for $32,000 plus the buyer’s premium in March 2021 at New Orleans Auction Galleries.

A monumental patinated bronze Beaux Arts garden fountain, standing 8ft tall, sold for $32,000 plus the buyer’s premium in March 2021 at New Orleans Auction Galleries.

NEW YORK — Antiques have never been solely for interior use. Avid gardeners have long incorporated antiques and artful objects into their gardens to create focal points and add character, history and texture. A large garden in suburbia isn’t necessary to pull off this look; even city or apartment dwellers can use antiques to create appealing gardens in small spaces.

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Mid-June sale of comic books & original comic book art sets records

Copy of Detective Comics No. 27, featuring the debut of Batman, which sold for $1.125 million

Copy of Detective Comics No. 27, featuring the debut of Batman, which sold for $1.125 million

DALLAS  – Another Comics & Comic Art event has come to an end at Heritage Auctions. And yet another world record has been set: a $22.4-million sale abundant with historic highpoints.

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American Revolutionary War-era tiger maple long gun, which sold for $255,000 plus the buyer’s premium

Revolutionary War rifle fired up bids at Cottone

American Revolutionary War-era tiger maple long gun, which sold for $255,000 plus the buyer’s premium

American Revolutionary War-era tiger maple long gun, which sold for $255,000 plus the buyer’s premium

GENESEO, N.Y. Cottone Auctions’s May 7-8 auction, which contained more than 650 lots, brought in $1.3 million. A fresh to the market American Revolutionary-era tiger maple rifle attracted competitive bidding and soared past its highest estimate, stealing the spotlight on the first day of the sale. 

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Utagawa Hiroshige, ‘Tree Bridge Gokanosho, Higo Province,’ estimated at $6,000-$7,000

Jasper52 sale revels in the glories of Japanese woodblock prints

Utagawa Hiroshige, ‘Tree Bridge Gokanosho, Higo Province,’ estimated at $6,000-$7,000

Utagawa Hiroshige, ‘Tree Bridge Gokanosho, Higo Province,’ estimated at $6,000-$7,000

NEW YORK – The Japanese began printing with wooden blocks sometime in the eighth century, but only in 1765 did they come up with a process that permitted printing in full color. That innovation, credited to Suzuki Harunobu, allowed for a golden age of ukiyo-e, the Japanese term for woodblock prints. The images caused a sensation all over the world, and influenced prominent artists such as Mary Cassatt, Vincent Van Gogh, and most notably, Claude Monet.

On June 30, beginning at 8 pm Eastern time, Jasper52 will offer 153 lots of Japanese woodblock prints. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Kambaba ‘Healing Sphere,’ estimated at $300-$350

New York auction showcases crystals, minerals and specimens

Kambaba ‘Healing Sphere,’ estimated at $300-$350

Kambaba ‘Healing Sphere,’ estimated at $300-$350

NEW YORK – Who hasn’t looked at a curve of earth and thought, “I wonder what’s under there?” We’ll never know the names of the humans countless centuries ago who first plunged crude tools, and probably their fingers, into the soil over and over and over again, just to see what might lurk beneath. Some of those ancient diggers reaped unfathomable rewards, discovering weird and wonderful rocks that glistened, gleamed, and sparkled. Our fascination with such treasures has never waned. If anything, it’s only grown stronger. Read more

Hall & Oates-signed artworks help raise funds for Stax Music Academy

Hall and Oates performing in October 2017 at the O2 in London. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Hall and Oates performing in October 2017 at the O2 in London. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Daryl Hall and John Oates, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees and the number-one selling duo in music history, have teamed up with the London/Austin, Texas-based Soundwaves Art Foundation to help raise funds for the nonprofit Stax Music Academy. The after-school and summer music institute, located at the original site of Stax Records in Memphis, Tennessee, offers deeply discounted tuition to help students earn music scholarships to college and have thriving careers in the music industry.

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The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam used artificial intelligence (AI) to recreate pieces of Rembrandt’s ‘Night Watch’ that had been cut away 70 years after the artist created it. On June 23, the Amsterdam museum unveiled the amended painting, shown here. Image courtesy of the Rijksmuseum.

Rijksmuseum restores Rembrandt’s ‘Night Watch’ to original form

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam used artificial intelligence (AI) to recreate pieces of Rembrandt’s ‘Night Watch’ that had been cut away 70 years after the artist created it. On June 23, the Amsterdam museum unveiled the amended painting, shown here. Image courtesy of the Rijksmuseum.

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam recreated pieces of Rembrandt’s ‘Night Watch’ that had been cut away 70 years after the artist created it. On June 23, the Amsterdam museum unveiled the amended painting, which shows the artist’s intention to place the two men in the foreground off-center. Image courtesy of the Rijksmuseum.

AMSTERDAM (AP) – One of Rembrandt van Rijn’s biggest paintings just got a bit bigger.

A marriage of art and artificial intelligence has enabled Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum to recreate parts of the iconic Night Watch painting that were snipped off 70 years after Rembrandt finished it.

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