Thomaston Place presents choice Native American artifacts, Jan. 14

Shield used at Little Big Horn by “One Hand,” est. $30,000-$40,000

Shield used at Little Big Horn by “One Hand,” est. $30,000-$40,000

THOMASTON, Me. –  A collection of important artifacts, the majority from the 14-year period between the Battle of the Little Big Horn and Wounded Knee, will be featured in Thomaston Place Auction Galleries‘ Native American sale on Friday, January 14. The inventory will include items worn and weapons carried in the fight with Custer, and stellar examples of weapons and dress. Some have direct connections to Geronimo and his flight to Canada involving what have been called the “Mangas Caves.” Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Roberto Lugo (American, b. 1981-), ‘The Expulsion of Colin Kaepernick and John Brown,’ 2017. Porcelain, china paint, luster, 47in by 24in by 24 in. (installed). Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Martha Delzell Memorial Fund, 2019.15A-B © Roberto Lugo. Courtesy of Wexler Gallery.

Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields show ‘Embodied’ explores the human figure

Roberto Lugo (American, b. 1981-), ‘The Expulsion of Colin Kaepernick and John Brown,’ 2017. Porcelain, china paint, luster, 47in by 24in by 24 in. (installed). Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Martha Delzell Memorial Fund, 2019.15A-B © Roberto Lugo. Courtesy of Wexler Gallery.

Roberto Lugo (American, b. 1981-), ‘The Expulsion of Colin Kaepernick and John Brown,’ 2017. Porcelain, china paint, luster, 47in by 24in by 24 in. (installed). Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Martha Delzell Memorial Fund, 2019.15A-B © Roberto Lugo. Courtesy of Wexler Gallery.

INDIANAPOLIS — Embodied: Human Figures in Art, an exhibition currently on view at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, consists entirely of artworks from the museum’s permanent collection and is displayed in a newly renovated corridor of galleries leading directly to the Clowes Pavilion, which will open in early 2022. All of the featured artworks depict the human body and are organized in a global thematic display.

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Natl. Gallery of Art celebrates Harlem Renaissance photography of James Van Der Zee

James Van Der Zee, ‘Beautiful Bride,’ circa 1930. Gelatin silver print image: 24.77cm by 19.37cm (9 3/4in by 7 5/8in) sheet: 25.4cm by 20cm (10in by 7 7/8in.) National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund 2021.33.1 © 1969 Van Der Zee

James Van Der Zee, ‘Beautiful Bride,’ circa 1930. Gelatin silver print, image: 24.77cm by 19.37cm (9 3/4in by 7 5/8in) sheet: 25.4cm by 20cm (10in by 7 7/8in.) National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund 2021.33.1 © 1969 Van Der Zee

WASHINGTON — Photographer James Van Der Zee (1886–1983) created an extraordinary chronicle of Black life in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood during the first half of the 20th century. On view from November 28, 2021, through May 30, 2022 at the National Gallery of Art, James Van Der Zee’s Photographs: A Portrait of Harlem presents some 40 works from the institutional collection, providing a window into life in the historic neighborhood during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. Harlem residents flocked to Van Der Zee’s studio to mark milestones in their lives, posing for portraits against elaborate backdrops. The exhibition highlights these portraits, as well as photographs of the community, revealing how Van Der Zee’s pictures, and the photographer himself, played a formative role in the community life of Harlem.

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A circa-1900 Dorflinger Montrose pattern green-to-clear punch bowl set with matching bowl, base, ladle and 13 cups achieved $110,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2014. Image courtesy of DuMouchelles and LiveAuctioneers

Punch bowls allow master artisans to flaunt their talents

A circa-1900 Dorflinger Montrose pattern green-to-clear punch bowl set with matching bowl, base, ladle and 13 cups achieved $110,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2014. Image courtesy of DuMouchelles and LiveAuctioneers

A circa-1900 Dorflinger Montrose pattern green-to-clear punch bowl set with matching bowl, base, ladle and 13 cups achieved $110,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2014. Image courtesy of DuMouchelles and LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK – Let’s make one thing clear right away: No one technically needs a punch bowl. In his delightful 2010 book, Punch, author, cocktail expert and historian David Wondrich spends a long paragraph recounting the many receptacles in which he has prepared the crowd-pleasing tipple, including, in part, “pasta pots, Le Crueset Dutch ovens, spackle buckets, salad spinners, five-gallon water-cooler jugs, candy dishes, candy jars, Lexans of all sizes, nameless orange plastic things from Home Depot, large earthenware pots, galvanized washtubs and a host of other miscellaneous vessels I’m not recalling.” But wanting a nice punch bowl has a long and honorable history. Wondrich states in Punch that the term “punchbowl” emerged by 1658 and silversmiths were producing them by 1680.

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Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907-1954) ‘Self-Portrait with Monkeys,’ 1943. Oil on canvas, 32 1/8in by 24 ¾in (81.5cm by 63cm). The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art and the Vergel Foundation. © 2021 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Norton Museum of Art explores Kahlo, Rivera & Mexican Modernism

Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907-1954) ‘Self-Portrait with Monkeys,’ 1943. Oil on canvas, 32 1/8in by 24 ¾in (81.5cm by 63cm). The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art and the Vergel Foundation. © 2021 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907-1954), ‘Self-Portrait with Monkeys,’ 1943. Oil on canvas, 32 1/8 in by 24 ¾ in (81.5 cm by 63 cm). From the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art and the Vergel Foundation. © 2021 Banco de Mexico Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F./ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – The Norton Museum of Art is pleased to present Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection, on view from October 23, 2021 through February 6, 2022. Featuring more than 150 works, including paintings and works on paper collected by Jacques and Natasha Gelman alongside photographs and period clothing, the exhibition includes the largest group of works by Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera ever on view at the institution.

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Wharton Esherick (1887-1970), ‘Fischer End Table with Lap Light,’ 1932. Walnut burl, 28 1⁄4 in by 26in by 28 3⁄4 in. Collection of Peter Fischer Cooke

Michener Art Museum spotlights three women who influenced Wharton Esherick

Wharton Esherick (1887-1970), ‘Fischer End Table with Lap Light,’ 1932. Walnut burl, 28 1⁄4 in by 26in by 28 3⁄4 in. Collection of Peter Fischer Cooke

Wharton Esherick (1887-1970), ‘Fischer End Table with Lap Light,’ 1932. Walnut burl, 28 1⁄4 in by 26in by 28 3⁄4 in. Collection of Peter Fischer Cooke

DOYLESTOWN, Pa. – The James A. Michener Art Museum is pleased to host an exhibition highlighting the influences that shaped the work of sculptor and woodworker Wharton Esherick. Daring Design: The Impact of Three Women on Wharton Esherick’s Craft opened September 10 and continues through February 6, 2022.

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Morphy Auctions reports blockbuster year with 2021 sales exceeding $50M

Rare and exceptional Mohawk Gasoline circular porcelain neon service station with Native American graphic and original cast-metal mounting stand. Produced in the 1930s for Mohawk Oil Co., Bakersfield, California. 9.0+ condition. Sold at Morphy’s Oct. 3-4, 2021 Automobilia & Petroliana Auction for its high-estimate price of $120,000

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy Auctions is pleased to report a year of unprecedented new-buyer interest and stellar results across all categories in 2021, with gross sales surpassing $50 million.

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Intriguing Hussein Shariffe abstract headlines Bruneau & Co. Jan. 6 sale

Oil on canvas abstract by Hussein Shariffe, est. $8,000-$12,000

Oil on canvas abstract by Hussein Shariffe, est. $8,000-$12,000

CRANSTON, R.I. – An exquisitely carved mahogany stained glass bronze bar recovered from a mansion in Newport, Rhode Island and an abstract oil-on-canvas modern painting by the Sudanese Asian artist Hussein Shariffe (1934-2005), are expected top lots in Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers’ online-only Estate Fine Art & Antiques auction slated for Thursday, January 6. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Catbus production cel from ‘My Neighbor Totoro,’ $40,800. Photo credit: Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Hayao Miyazake ‘Catbus’ production cel drives anime auction to $2.6M

Catbus production cel from ‘My Neighbor Totoro,’ $40,800. Photo credit: Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Catbus production cel from ‘My Neighbor Totoro,’ $40,800. Photo credit: Heritage Auctions, HA.com

DALLAS — It was the rare sequel that outperformed the original. Heritage Auctions‘ four-day Art of Anime and Everything Cool II Animation Art Signature® Auction, which wrapped December 13, realized $2,635,985 to outperform its June predecessor — itself, a multiple record-setter as the world’s first auction highlighting anime. Numerous lots far exceeded their initial estimates in this complete sell-out.

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A copper slave badge found on the site of a 19th-century kitchen in Charleston, S.C., has been named one of the world’s top 2021 discoveries by Archaeology Magazine. Image courtesy of the College of Charleston

South Carolina slave badge named one of world’s top 2021 discoveries

A copper slave badge found on the site of a 19th-century kitchen in Charleston, S.C., has been named one of the world’s top 2021 discoveries by Archaeology Magazine. Image courtesy of the College of Charleston

A copper slave badge found on the site of a 19th-century kitchen in Charleston, S.C., has been named one of the world’s top 2021 discoveries by Archaeology Magazine. Image courtesy of the College of Charleston

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) – A small yet profound object tied to slavery and unearthed by a team of researchers and students at the College of Charleston this spring has been named one of the top discoveries of the year by Archaeology Magazine.

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