Clementine Hunter, ‘Wedding,’ est. $15,000-$18,000

Clementine Hunter wedding scene a highlight of Jasper52’s July 6 auction

 

 

 Clementine Hunter, ‘Wedding,’ est. $15,000-$18,000


Clementine Hunter, ‘Wedding,’ est. $15,000-$18,000

NEW YORK – Paintings by Georges Clairin, Clementine Hunter and G. Campbell Lyman should all earn top lot status at Jasper52’s Fine Prints, Paintings, and Decorative Arts auction, which will take place at noon on Wednesday, July 6. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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John Dunlap and David Claypool, The Official First Edition of the Constitution, 1787, ink on paper, 16 1/8 by 10 1/8in. Private collection. Photography courtesy of Sotheby’s, Inc.

Original print of U.S. Constitution at heart of Crystal Bridges show

 

John Dunlap and David Claypool, The Official First Edition of the Constitution, 1787, ink on paper, 16 1/8 by 10 1/8in. Private collection. Photography courtesy of Sotheby’s, Inc.

John Dunlap and David Claypool, The Official First Edition of the Constitution, 1787, ink on paper, 16 1/8 by 10 1/8in. Private collection. Photography courtesy of Sotheby’s, Inc.

BENTONVILLE, Ark. – Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art will open We the People: The Radical Notion of Democracy, placing a rare, original print of the U.S. Constitution — there are just 11 known in the world — in conversation with works of art that provide diverse perspectives on the nation’s founding principles. Original prints of other founding and historical documents, including the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, the proposed Bill of Rights and the Emancipation Proclamation will also be on view alongside works by influential historical and contemporary artists, including several works new to the Crystal Bridges collection by Shelley Niro, Roger Shimomura and Luis C. Garza. A new Mark Bradford work, in which he shall be, will debut in the exhibition. We the People: The Radical Notion of Democracy will be on view from July 2 to January 2, 2023.

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A silver-mounted and inlaid American Revolutionary War tomahawk, taken from a captured combatant and brought back to England as a war trophy, sold for $540,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020. Image courtesy of Dan Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

Revolutionary War artifacts: American storytellers

A silver-mounted and inlaid American Revolutionary War tomahawk, taken from a captured combatant and brought back to England as a war trophy, sold for $540,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020. Image courtesy of Dan Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

A silver-mounted and inlaid Colonial Revolutionary War tomahawk, taken from a captured combatant and brought back to England as a war trophy, sold for $540,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020. Image courtesy of Dan Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — The nearly 60 men who made up the Continental Congress gathered in the Pennsylvania State House (now called Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776 to formally adopt the Declaration of Independence. This was no simple vote. Of this group, about a third had served in the Revolutionary War as militia officers and had seen firsthand the horrors of the war that began in April 1775. In this momentous act, which was considered treason against Britain, Colonial America renounced England and declared it was its own country: The United States of America.

The Fourth of July holiday presents the perfect opportunity to consider collecting artifacts from the Revolutionary War and explore why interest in this material only continues to grow.

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