Rare celery vase brings $37,375 at Jeffrey S. Evans sale

Top lot of the auction was this mportant Pittsburgh engraved celery vase featuring a seated greyhound. Attributed to Bakewell, Page and Bakewell, circa 1830, it sold for $37,375.00. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates images

Top lot of the auction was this mportant Pittsburgh engraved celery vase featuring a seated greyhound. Attributed to Bakewell, Page and Bakewell, circa 1830, it sold for $37,375.00. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates images

MT. CRAWFORD, Va., – The highlight of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ 18th and 19th century glass and lighting auction held May 20 was the $37,375 paid by a private collector for an important Bakewell, Page & Bakewell, Pittsburgh, blown, cut and engraved celery vase made circa 1830. The vase’s exquisite decoration featured a seated greyhound, an iconic motif favored by the Bakewell family.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided absentee and Internet live bidding.

Bidding on the Bakewell celery vase opened at $8,500 and quickly soared past its $8,000-$12,000 estimate, with nine phone bidders including two institutions, all charmed by the unique size and combination of decorative elements of this one vase. All prices include the 15 percent buyer’s premium.

Top among the colored vases offered were a pair of pressed Loop/Leaf examples in a brilliant deep peacock green and in immaculate condition, attributed to the Boston & Sandwich Glass Co., circa 1845-1860, that sold for $10,925.

An important Americo-Bohemian ruby-stained tankard stein engraved with an east view of the “Capital Washington” flanked by scrolls, probably Bohemia, circa 1860, also did quite well, selling for $5,750, about twice the estimate. The view is unusual, the form is of a previously unrecorded type and the stein was in outstanding condition.

The lighting section of the sale was very strong and diverse featuring examples from the whale oil, fluid, and early kerosene periods. A pair of amber pressed Loop/Leaf stand lamps reached $6,325 because of their rare color.

Lacy-period pressed glass included rare open salts highlighted by an example in the form of a sleigh, designated SH-1 in Pressed Glass Salt Dishes of the Lacy Period 1825-1850 by Dorothy Neal. It was only the second example that the Evans has sold. Condition of this example was excellent which obviously contributed to its selling price of $4,025, well above the estimate of $1,000-$2,000.

For further information email info@jeffreysevans.com or call 540-434-3939.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.