Skip to content
‘Sad Street’ by Michael Goldberg, estimated at $100,000-$150,000 at Freeman’s Hindman April 24.

Michael Goldberg’s ‘Sad Street’ leads our five lots to watch

Michael Goldberg, ‘Sad Street’

CHICAGO – Michael Goldberg (1924-2007) was a leading member of the Abstract Expressionist movement in New York. He was friends with Hans Hofmann, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler, and is best remembered for the gestural action paintings that defined his artistic career.

Goldberg earned a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart serving in both North Africa and the China-Burma-India theaters of World War II. His injuries lead to partial paralysis in his arm, for which the Veterans Administration recommended he pursue stone carving and sculpting as rehabilitation. This exposed him to elements of collage that would later become an integral part of his painting practice.

Sad Street is from 1958 and is considered a masterpiece of Goldberg’s output. Freeman’s Hindman describes it as “an expansively abstract work, all thickly applied dynamism and expressive brushwork, a brother to the Smithsonian’s Sardines.” The 60 by 54in oil on canvas appears as part of its Post War and Contemporary Art sale scheduled for Wednesday, April 24. It is estimated at $100,000-$150,000.

Circa-1937 ‘Shake a Leg’ Novelty Cocktail Shaker

‘Shake a Leg’ ruby glass and chrome plated novelty cocktail shaker, estimated at $1,500-$2,500 at Woody Auction on April 20.
‘Shake a Leg’ ruby glass and chrome plated novelty cocktail shaker, estimated at $1,500-$2,500 at Woody Auction on April 20.

DOUGLASS, Kan. – The Saturday, April 20 sale at Woody Auction titled Art Glass, Lamps, & Much More includes this ruby glass and chrome-plated novelty cocktail shaker. Dated circa 1937, the ‘Shake a Leg’ mixer was made for only a brief time by West Virginia Specialty Glass. This example, from the private collection of Frank and Melissa Keathley of Top Shelf Antiques of Texas, carries an estimate of $1,500-$2,500.

Samuel Morse-signed Carte De Visite

Signed Samuel Morse carte-de-visite, estimated at $800-$1,200 at Turner Auctions + Appraisals on April 21.
Signed Samuel Morse carte-de-visite, estimated at $800-$1,200 at Turner Auctions + Appraisals on April 21.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – Turner Auctions + Appraisals will open A Secret Vault on Sunday, April 21. The sale features a selection of collectables recently rediscovered by the owners, a couple from Northern California, which were passed down from a family member. Housed in a storage vault in Wyoming were a cache of stamps, coins, and autographs, seemingly bought through the venerable British firm Stanley Gibbons (which is now part of the Strand Collectibles Group). The 95 lots include this carte-de-visite photograph of a bearded Samuel Morse (1791-1872) autographed on the verso in black fountain pen as ‘Saml. FB Morse’. It is estimated at $800-$1,200.

Earliest-known Miller's Reversible Minnow Lure with Picture Box

Miller's Artificial Baits For Game Fish Minnow lure with original box, estimated at $3,000-$4,000 at Blanchard’s Auction Service April 26.
Miller's Artificial Baits For Game Fish Minnow lure with original box, estimated at $3,000-$4,000 at Blanchard’s Auction Service April 26.

POTSDAM, N.Y. – Blanchard’s Auction Service brings 730 lots of antique angling gear to market Friday, April 26, including an early 1910s Miller’s Reversible Minnow with an incredibly scarce and clean picture box, estimated at $3,000-$4,000.

Marked ‘Miller’s Artificial Baits For Game Fish Minnow,’ the white pasteboard box features a crisp illustration of the lure and bears the words ‘Manufactured by Combo Engineering Co., Inc. Union Springs, N.Y.’

The 4 1/4in minnow features a slender wood body finished in yellow with hand-painted gold spots, fine through-body wire, and PAT. PEND.-marked brass and gunmetal reversible spinners, with Miller’s silver-washered screw eye rigging and the original barrel swivel.

Although most likely unfished, the lure has areas of uneven varnish and similar wear from decades of tackle box storage. The extraordinary and historically important box is solid, with some wear and soiling, and is one of the nicest examples of the few known to collectors. As described by the auctioneer, “Even for the most advanced lure collection, this combination would be considered the holy grail – you may never see another.”

Black-Figure Amphora Attributed to the Antimenes Painter

Black-figure amphora attributed to the Antimenes Painter, estimated at £45,000-£90,000 ($56,860-$113,720) at Apollo Art Auctions April 27.
Black-figure amphora attributed to the Antimenes Painter, estimated at £45,000-£90,000 ($56,860-$113,720) at Apollo Art Auctions April 27.

LONDON – The Antimenes Painter is a term used by archaeologists and historians to describe an unknown artisan who was active between 530 and 510 BC in the Etruria region of ancient Italy that spans portions of modern-day Tuscany, Lazio, and Umbria. At least 150 works are ascribed to him, with most found in Etruria, and it is believed he was employed in the art workshops of Andokides. His figural renderings mimic those of Psiax, who was active 525 to 505 BC.

Apollo Art Auctions specializes in fine antiquities with clear provenance. This black-figure two-handled amphora features a festive scene featuring Dionysus, the Greek god of wine. In the illustration, Dionysus can be seen holding his drinking cup (kantharos) and is surrounded by dancing companions, including a satyr and a maenad.

The amphora is described as being of exceptionally high quality and comes with an authentication certificate from the CIRAM laboratory in France, including a thermoluminescence test. It is also accompanied by a professional historical report from Ancient Report Specialists and has been fully cleared by the Art Loss Register. Estimated as the top lot in Apollo Art Auctions’ two-day Fine Ancient Art & Antiquities sale on Saturday, April 27 and Sunday, April 28, the Antimenes Painter amphora is estimated at £45,000-£90,000 ($56,860-$113,720).