Auction Team Breker sets sights on April 23-24 vintage audio-video auction

Salon camera with Häring lens, 1864, $2,000-$2,700

Salon camera with Häring lens, 1864, $2,000-$2,700

COLOGNE, Germany – Auction Team Breker will host a two-day auction celebrating 200 years of audio-video technology beginning April 23 at 2 pm Eastern time. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers. The auction starts with Vision — Photographica and Film, a session devoted to antique and collectible cameras. Included in a group of mahogany and brass apparatus is an imposing studio camera with a Häring lens as well as portable innovations such as an amateur outfit that recalls the celebrated Appareil Dubroni of 1864.

No photographic auction would be complete without Leica products, and Breker’s sale has an excellent range for the collector and user alike. Highlights include screw-fit rarities like the Model B Compur and the 250 FF Reporter and M-fit classics, lenses and accessories.

Leica I (Model B) with rim-set Compur shutter, 1934, $4,900-$6,700

Leica I (Model B) with rim-set Compur shutter, 1934, $4,900-$6,700

Rounding out the first day is a stylish selection of 35mm black and chrome cameras from the 1950s.

On Saturday, April 24 starting at 10 am Eastern time, Breker presents day two of the sale, titled Sound – Mechanical, Music, Telecommunications, Technology and Toys. It features an extensive private collection of 78rpm records encompassing swing, blues, ragtime and jazz and rock-and-roll hits, as well as historic recordings of the Beatles, Elvis Presley, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and other famous names.

Of particular note is a recording from the premiere of Kurt Weill’s Threepenny Opera on August 31, 1928 in Berlin, as well as the Barbara Song and the Ballad of Mack the Knife, performed by the Haller Jazz Revue in 1929.

The auction also showcases a group of early wireless equipment, including an AEG four-level broadcast receiver from 1924-25 and an original interview table from Peter Friedrich Schneider’s iconic radio station in Cologne.

Complementing the radios are music machines in many forms, from the elegant Art-Nouveau Pathé Concert Model 5 phonograph to the striking Wurlitzer 1080 jukebox designed by Paul Fuller in 1947.

Wurlitzer Model 1080 (“Colonial”) jukebox with 24 original discs, 1947, $8,500-$11,000

Wurlitzer Model 1080 (“Colonial”) jukebox with 24 original discs, 1947, $8,500-$11,000

Stepping back in time to the 19th century provides a glimpse of entertainment in the Victorian era. Barrel organs and musical boxes were the first forms of programmable sound for the home. The precursor of the jukebox was the interchangeable disc musical box, while carillon clocks kept time and marked the hours melodiously.

Regina Style 34 automatic disc-changing musical box for 12 discs, circa 1903, $27,000-$31,000

Regina Style 34 automatic disc-changing musical box for 12 discs, circa 1903, $27,000-$31,000

Innovations in home and office communication are well represented by a lineup of early telephone equipment and writing machines.

Early "Système Ader" table telephone, Société Générale des Téléphones, France, circa 1880, $4,300-$6,100

Early “Système Ader” table telephone, Société Générale des Téléphones, France, circa 1880, $4,300-$6,100

Bid absentee or live online through LiveAuctioneers.

 

View top auction results on LiveAuctioneers here: https://www.liveauctioneers.com/pages/recent-auction-sales/