DuMouchelles geared up for big 3-day auction, Aug. 14-16

The ivory hands and face of this chryselephantine sculpture by Walter Schott (German, 1861-1938) are in sound condition. The gilded bronze is from the Gladenbeck Foundry, Berlin. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

The ivory hands and face of this chryselephantine sculpture by Walter Schott (German, 1861-1938) are in sound condition. The gilded bronze is from the Gladenbeck Foundry, Berlin. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

DETROIT – While literally in the shadow of the GM Renaissance Center, DuMouchelles doesn’t take a back seat to anyone when it comes to conducting Cadillac-grade auctions. DuMouchelles’ next sale, Aug. 14-16, promises a wealth of fine art, antiques and jewelry that will turn tire kickers into discriminating buyers.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

DuMouchelles’ lineup will be a blend of American and imports, from a fine painting by Detroit’s own Douglas Arthur Teed to a 14-inch chryselephantine figure of a dancer – a real beauty – by German sculptor Walter Schott.

Friday’s session begins at 6:30 p.m. Eastern and will include American furnishings, lighting, jewelry, cast-iron banks, Chinese porcelains and a collection of firearms and knives.

Saturday’s sale will start right up at 11 a.m. Eastern with a 9-inch Newcomb College Pottery vase signed “R.B.K.” for Roberta Kennon, which has a $500-$1,000 estimate.

Five lots later will be a set of 10 English porcelain plates retailed by Tiffany & Co., which DuMouchelles partner Joan Walker anticipates will be the “sleeper” of the auction.

“Each is hand-painted with a different scene and signed ‘Hartman.’ They’re absolutely exquisite,” said Walker. “The price (estimate, $500-$800) is low but they should get a lot of attention.”

From the same Birmingham, Mich., estate is a modern ladder-form glass sculpture by Therman Statom in 1953. The painted glass ladder, mounted with glass accents, is 82 inches high by 20 1/2 inches wide. It has a $6,000-$8,000 estimate.

Walker said that she is fond of a d’ore bronze bust of a smiling child by Jean Antoine Injalbert (French, 1845-1933). Mounted on an onyx pedestal, the bust is 19 1/4 inches high and has a $2,000-$3,000.

More than 170 lots of fine art will be sold on Sunday beginning at noon. An 18th-century oil on canvas painting by French artist Jean Baptiste Huet of a woodland scene with a young couple and dogs, 23 1/2 by 28 1/4 inches, is estimated at $20,000-$30,000. “It’s very well done,” commented Walker.

An oil on canvas painting titled Grand Bazaar, Cairo is by Detroit artist Douglas Arthur Teed (1863-1929). The 24- by 30-inch painting has a label on the back from Detroit Institute of Arts dated 1927, the year the artist entered it in an exhibition at the museum. In its original frame and in good condition, the painting carries a $5,000-$6,000 estimate.

From a Bloomfield Hills, Mich., estate is a charming genre scene by Antonio Bianchi (Italian b. 1875) of a beautiful young girl straightening an older gentleman’s necktie. The oil on canvas painting is 29 by 24 inches and estimated at $4,000-$5,000.

A 13-inch gilded bronze sculpture by Theophile Somme (French, 1871-1952) of a Middle Eastern dancer is estimated at $2,000-$3,000.

Two KPM hand-painted porcelain plaques will be offered. One titled Last Day of Pompeii is 13 by 8 inches and is in a gilt Florentine frame. It has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate. The other is after Raphael’s Sistine Madonna and is 15 1/8 by 12 1/4. Its estimate is $8,000-$10,000.

A Pablo Picasso white earthenware charger dated 1956 and inscribed “Vallauris” is another of Sunday’s highlights. The plate is 16 5/8 inches in diameter and has a $5,000-$7,000 estimate.

Wristwatch collectors will pick from a collection of about 30 of the finest by Rolex, Cartier and Tag Heuer. A Piaget lady’s wristwatch has 92 round-cut diamonds in an 18-karat yellow gold band and a $10,000-$15,000 estimate.

“It’s an incredible collection of sophisticated wristwatches,” said Walker.

DuMouchelles’ auction gallery is located at 409 E. Jefferson Ave. in downtown Detroit.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

Click here to view DuMouchelles’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Newcomb Pottery artist Roberta Kennon decorated this 9-inch vase, which has a $500-$1,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Newcomb Pottery artist Roberta Kennon decorated this 9-inch vase, which has a $500-$1,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.


Brownsfield, a venerable English pottery, produced this set of hand-painted porcelain plates for Tiffany & Co. around the turn of the 20th century. Each of the 9-inch plates is artist signed and titled on the reverse. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Brownsfield, a venerable English pottery, produced this set of hand-painted porcelain plates for Tiffany & Co. around the turn of the 20th century. Each of the 9-inch plates is artist signed and titled on the reverse. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.


Titled ‘Last Day of Pompeii,' this KPM plaque is marked ‘Glave' in the right center. It has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Titled ‘Last Day of Pompeii,’ this KPM plaque is marked ‘Glave’ in the right center. It has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.


Fine detail is noted in this oil on canvas painting attributed to Jean Baptiste Huet (French, 1745-1811). It carries a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Fine detail is noted in this oil on canvas painting attributed to Jean Baptiste Huet (French, 1745-1811). It carries a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.


Douglas Arthur Teed, who died in Detroit in 1929, traveled through the Middle East from 1907 to 1911. He painted this 24- by 30-inch oil on canvas, ‘Grand Bazaar, Cairo' in 1921. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Douglas Arthur Teed, who died in Detroit in 1929, traveled through the Middle East from 1907 to 1911. He painted this 24- by 30-inch oil on canvas, ‘Grand Bazaar, Cairo’ in 1921. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.