Far corners of the globe found in antiquarian map sale May 15

Cellarius celestial map from the Southern Hemisphere, Valk & Schenk edition, 1708, Amsterdam, 16.8in. x 19.1in. Estimate: $2,000-$2,500. Jasper52 image

NEW YORK – Collectors can find their place in the world and even the solar system by viewing the Premium Antiquarian Maps auction that will be held by Jasper52 on Wednesday, May 15. More than 100 vintage illustrated maps and views by some of the most significant cartographers of their times will cross the auction block. Bid absentee or live online exclusively through LiveAuctioneers.

Stargazers will be captivated by the Celestial Map from the Southern Hemisphere (above) by Dutch-German cartographer Andreas Cellarium. Published in Amsterdam in 1708, this colorful celestial chart presents a classic view of the southern sky. It has two cartouches, plenty of putti and elaborate scenes of people engaged in astronomy (est. $2,000-$2,500).

Another view from down under is an early map of New Zealand showing the route taken by Capt. James Cook in 1769 and 1770. Italian cartographer Antonio Zatta engraved the map, which was published in 1779. This a folding map and has nothing printed on the reverse. The hand-coloring is original (est. $2,000-$3,000).

An early map of New Zealand showing the route taken by Capt. James Cook in 1769 and 1770, published in Venice 1779, 18.25in. x 14.5in. Estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Jasper52 image

The Kingdome of Great Britaine and Ireland, a rather famous map engraved by Jodocus  Hondius for issue in John Speed’s Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain, offers plenty of topographical, river, lake and settlement detail. The upper part of the map is flanked by views of London and Edinburgh, and an inset map of the Orkneys. The London view is circa 1600, with St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Tower on the north bank and the Globe on the south (est. $1,500-$2,000).

J. Speed map of the British Isles, 1611, London, 14.8in. x 19.8in. Estimate: $1,500-$2,000. Jasper52 image

The auction also presents the earliest printed map specifically of Wales, that was compiled by Humphrey Llwyd (Lloyd) shortly before his death in 1568. This hand-colored map was first published in 1573 by Abraham Ortelius. Cambriae Typus is the first printed map to show Wales as a separate region and although it has many inaccuracies, e.g. showing Wales as extending to the River Severn (and therefore including large parts of what is now known as England), it was a great improvement on earlier maps.

Earliest printed map of Wales, circa 1573, compiled by Humphrey Llwyd (Lloyd), published in 1573 by Abraham Ortelius, hand-colored, 19½in. x 13½.in., frame: 24½in. x 21in. Estimate: $1,400-$1,500. Jasper52 image

Moving on to the Americas, the auction offers a map of Bermuda, which served as the title sheet of a 12-sheet map of the United Colonies of the North America (soon to become the United States – the map was published in in 1779, during the American War of Independence). The Italian copperplate map features original hand-color (est. $2,500-$3,000).

Burmuda serves as the title sheet of a 12-sheet sheet map of the ‘United Colonies of the North America,’ published in Venice in 1779, 13.75in. x 18in. $2,500-$3,000. Jasper52 image

Matthaus Seutter’s highly influential map of 1730 New England extending to Virginia shows great detail as to settlements, topography, native animals and American Indian tribes and several fortified villages. The inset is a rendition of the famous Restitutio View of Manhattan, which originally commemorated the short-lived Dutch recapture of New Amsterdam in 1673 (est. $2,500-$3,000).

Seutter Map of New England to Virginia, 1730, Nuremberg, 19.5in. x 22.7in. Estimate: $2,500-
$3,000. Jasper52 image. Jasper52 image

The Jasper52 Premium Antiquarian Maps auction will be held Wednesday, May 15, starting at 8 p.m. Eastern time.