Heritage presents superlative Western art collection, Nov. 30

Fritz Scholder, ‘Dartmouth Portrait #16,’ estimated at $25,000-$35,000. Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Fritz Scholder, ‘Dartmouth Portrait #16,’ estimated at $25,000-$35,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions, HA.com

DALLAS – Heritage Auctions will present a sale titled Visions of the Southwest: Property from the Collection of Jack B. Harrod on Wednesday, November 30. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

This special online-only auction features a collection built by a person who was truly remarkable not only in his consistent focus on quality, but in his interest in a broad range of material, from delightful pottery and unique creations by regional artisans to top-tier works by the most prominent painters of the Southwest.

John Nieto, ‘Comanche Dancer,’ estimated at $12,000-$18,000. Heritage Auctions, HA.com

John Nieto, ‘Comanche Dancer,’ estimated at $12,000-$18,000. Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Originally from Pine Bluff, Arkansas, Jack B. Harrod lived a life immersed in culture and the arts. A graduate of the University of Arkansas, he remained a lifelong Razorback fan and was an ardent supporter of Dallas professional sports teams. Harrod was a successful executive at Texas Instruments and a philanthropic patron of the Dallas arts community. A connoisseur who delighted in a broad range of cultures and artistic media, Harrod amassed an encyclopedic collection of vinyl records, from opera to hard rock, with a special focus on his beloved vintage blues, in addition to fine wine, scotch and sports memorabilia.

Helen (Tsa-Sah-Wee-Eh) Hardin, ‘The Merging of Mystical Man and Masks,’ estimated at $6,000-$8,000. Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Helen (Tsa-Sah-Wee-Eh) Hardin, ‘The Merging of Mystical Man and Masks,’ estimated at $6,000-$8,000. Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Above all of his pursuits, Harrod’s greatest passion was the art and culture of the American Southwest. While stationed with the army in Utah, he became inspired by the Native American cultures and art he encountered there. It was this inspiration that led him and his wife Mary Jo to build their collection of Southwestern and Native American art, pottery and sculpture. Though their primary residence was in Plano, on the outskirts of Dallas, the couple’s home away from home was Santa Fe. The Harrods became dynamic and prominent members of the Santa Fe art community, befriending artists, gallery owners and many indigenous and local artisans.

Dan Namingha, ‘Hopi Kwahu kachina,’ estimated at $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Dan Namingha, ‘Hopi Kwahu kachina,’ estimated at $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Though Harrod didn’t have children, he was a loving uncle and a devoted family man. Many of his family’s cherished memories were built around the holidays and family gatherings, with Harrod at the center. Friends and family relied on him to always lend an ear, and he generously provided his support and his wisdom to those close to him. He is remembered fondly by both his family and both the Dallas-Fort Worth and Santa Fe communities.

 

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