RR Auction presents winning Olympic lineup, Jan. 20

St. Louis 1904 Olympic silver winner's long jump medal, awarded to Daniel Frank, est. $75,000-$100,000

St. Louis 1904 Olympic silver medal for the long jump, awarded to Daniel Frank, est. $75,000-$100,000

BOSTON – Boasting an unprecedented selection of nearly 200 lots of winner’s medals, torches and outstanding ephemera, RR Auction‘s January 20 Olympic auction is set to be a record-breaker. View the fully illustrated catalog on LiveAuctioneers.

Highlights include Daniel Frank’s St. Louis 1904 Olympic silver winner’s medal for the long jump. Designed and minted by Dieges & Clust, New York, its front is inscribed “Olympiad, 1904” and depicts a victorious athlete holding a wreath in front of an ancient Greek athlete frieze and the Acropolis. The reverse pictures a standing Nike and a bust of Zeus, and is engraved with the event’s name: “Running Broad Jump.” Also included is a period leather case for the medal and a period leather scrapbook. The lot carries an estimate of $75,000-$100,000.

 St. Louis 1904 Olympic silver medal for the long jump, awarded to Daniel Frank, shown in its case, est. $75,000-$100,000


St. Louis 1904 Olympic silver medal for the long jump, awarded to Daniel Frank, shown in its case, est. $75,000-$100,000

A Jewish member of the New West Side Athletic Club in New York City, Dan Frank made the United States’ track and field team at the 1904 St. Louis Olympics and competed in the long jump (then called the broad jump). During the contest, Frank won the silver medal with a leap of 22ft, 7 3/4in (6.89 m), finishing second to fellow American Myer Prinstein, who set the Olympic record with a jump of 24ft, 1in (7.34 m) and in so doing exacted revenge on Frank, who had recently bested him at the 1904 Metropolitan AAU Championships. Modified by its recipient to be worn and displayed with pride, the early Olympic winner’s medal is only the second RR Auction has offered from the historic III Olympiad.

1994 Lillehammer Olympic gold medal for ice hockey, est. $50,000-$60,000

1994 Lillehammer Olympic gold medal for ice hockey, est. $50,000-$60,000

Also up for bid is an Olympic gold medal for Ice Hockey from the 1994 Lillehammer Winter Games. Manufactured by Th. Marthinsen of Tonsberg, the medal contains a polished circular piece of 600 million-year-old sparagmite, better known as granite, which was collected from the Lillehammer Olympic Park during the construction of the Lysgardsbakkene Ski Jumping Arena. The rim features the initials of the designer, Ingjerd Hanevold, and the mint, and the medal bears slight scuffing, most noticeably to the front side. The lot includes the medal’s original blue and maroon grosgrain ribbon that replicates the ice crystal motif. Its estimate is $50,000-$60,000.

1994 Lillehammer Olympic gold medal for ice hockey, est. $50,000-$60,000

1994 Lillehammer Olympic gold medal for ice hockey, est. $50,000-$60,000

According to Hanevold, she designed the medals to be “humorous, sober, and recognizable” and that their design is “Norwegian through and through.” Her choice of sparagmite was in keeping with the guiding principles behind the Lillehammer Games as a means of presenting Norway’s genuine natural surroundings and increasing national environmental awareness. “The medals symbolize the very essence of Norway, the Norwegian mountain landscape. The stone also serves a symbolic function; it reminds us of how precious our earth and nature are, and how important it is that we protect them.”

 Torch carried during the first Winter Olympics relay at Oslo, est. $65,000-$75,000


Torch carried during the first Winter Olympics relay at Oslo, est. $65,000-$75,000

Among the more than 30 Olympic torches on offer is an example from the first Winter Olympics relay at Oslo. The historically significant Olympics torch is constructed of a silver-colored brass and steel alloy, and was designed by Geir Grung and Adolf Thoresen. The oval-shaped top is engraved with large Olympic rings and a representation of the relay route from Morgedal to Oslo. The handle and bowl exhibit various scuffs and scratches. This first-ever Winter Olympics torch relay was designed to honor the origins of skiing. It began in Morgedal, county of Telemark, at the birthplace of 19th-century legend Sondre Norheim, considered the father of skiing in Norway. The symbolic flame was then carried 225 km (139.8 miles) by a total of just 94 torchbearers, arriving two days later at Oslo’s Bislett Stadium on February 15 for the opening ceremony. One of fewer than 100 produced, it is estimated at $65,000-$75,000.

Online bidding for the Olympic auction from RR Auction will conclude on January 20. For more information, go to www.rrauction.com.

 

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