Vinyl Valhalla: Heritage offers peerless record collection, March 12-13

Multi-colored vinyl pressing of Bob Dylan’s 17th LP, Desire, est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Multi-colored vinyl pressing of Bob Dylan’s 17th LP, Desire, est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

DALLAS — Heritage Auctions will present the David Swartz Vintage Vinyl Collection Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature® Auction on Saturday, March 12, and Sunday, March 13, featuring 365 items from Swartz’s impressive collection. In addition to rare recordings by Bob Dylan, the Beatles and other headliners, auction highlights include the original, uncensored version of David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs from 1974, the unique unassembled production sleeve originally made for the Rolling Stones’ 1968 Street Fighting Man single and an ultra-rare copy of the 1962 Tony Sheridan and the Beatles 7-inch My Bonnie single. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

For David Swartz, it started with the Who. Then it became about the why.

In addition to making him a lifelong fan of the band, hearing the band’s 1971 Who’s Next album for the first time sent Swartz on a journey that has resulted in one of the greatest record collections in the world.

David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs with its original, uncensored, withdrawn gatefold, est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs with its original, uncensored gatefold, est. $800-$1,200. Courtesy Heritage Auctions

During the past three decades, the New York-based collector has amassed thousands of pieces of music memorabilia, including a trove of vintage concert posters and a jaw-dropping assortment of rare records. The treasures in Swartz’s vinyl collection run the gamut from white label promo copies meant only for radio station DJs to limited-run pressings on colored vinyl, with records by the likes of the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and a festival’s worth of other music luminaries.

But the Who is who started it all.

“The music of the Who resonated with me with their visceral sound,” Swartz says, “which was balanced with lyrics that connected with the daily struggles of youth of the time, but that are timeless.”

Sealed first state copy of the withdrawn Butcher Cover of the Beatles’ Yesterday and Today album, est. $925-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Sealed first state copy of the infamous Butcher Cover of the Beatles’ Yesterday and Today album, est. $925-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Growing up in Andover, Massachusetts, about 30 miles from Boston, Swartz spent hours scouring the used record stores of Harvard Square, looking for the Who’s live records or collections of unreleased studio material (official or bootleg – it didn’t matter). He later branched out to other artists and other genres, adding R&B and jazz records to his growing rock ‘n’ roll library.

Seven-inch pressing of My Bonnie by Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers (aka The Beatles), est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Seven-inch pressing of My Bonnie by Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers (aka The Beatles), est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

In March, Swartz will give other music lovers a chance to enhance their collections when he opens his vintage vinyl vault for a two-day event at Heritage Auctions.

And, of course, there are plenty of recordings by the band that first took hold of Swartz’s eighth-grade soul and never let go, including four of the Who’s rare Japanese-only LPs: I’m a Boy, Sell Out, My Generation and Exciting.

“In all my years of buying, selling, trading and consigning vinyl, I have never seen such a diverse amount of rare vinyl,” says Garry Shrum, Heritage Auctions’ Director of Entertainment & Music Memorabilia. “Some of these items I’ve only seen once at record shows behind glass cases. My mind was blown when I saw all of these records in David’s collection.”

Uncut single artwork proof, with negatives, for the picture sleeve of the Rolling Stones’ Street Fighting Man single, est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Uncut single artwork proof, with negatives, for the picture sleeve of the Rolling Stones’ Street Fighting Man single, est. $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Even better, as Shrum notes, these decades-old records remain in pristine condition.

For Swartz, even though he is letting go of a few hundred of his treasures, the hunt continues. “I’m still trying to get a complete set of the Who’s singles from Japan in promo form and a copy of My Generation with an obi [strip], also from Japan,” he says. “For memorabilia, finding a 1960s Rickenbacker formerly owned and played by Pete Townshend would be a holy grail item.”

 

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