Hermes handbags made for the discriminating few

This Shiny Fuchsia Porosus Crocodile Birkin 35cm has a catch and padlock of 18K white gold, studded with diamonds. Courtesy Christie’s

 

Cleopatra had all the luxury goods the ancient world could offer – but the Queen of the Nile did not have to carry her own stuff.
Handbags arose when women took charge of their own lives and had to have their personal possessions on call wherever they traveled.

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Designer Raymond Loewy never left well enough alone

This red DF-2000 cabinet of plastic, laminate and enameled aluminum was designed by Raymond Loewy circa 1960 and manufactured by Compagnie d’Esthetique Industrielle, France. Image courtesy Wright, Chicago

 

Many find it surprising to learn Raymond Loewy, the designer of so many quintessential American products, was born in Paris. He was born in 1893 to an Austrian father and French mother, and died July 14 (Bastille Day), 1986 in Monte Carlo. One can find many examples of Loewy’s designs for sale in the secondary market, particularly from the late- to mid-20th century.

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Joan Miro challenged art as well as himself

Indicating he intended to ‘push this painting to the limit,’ Miró worked steadily on ‘Still Life with Old Shoe’ for four months in 1937. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Department of Imaging Services. Copyright 2008 Successio Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

 

The 1918 wartime tune How ’Ya Gonna Keep ’Em Down on the Farm (After They’ve Seen Paree) was all about U.S. doughboys returning home from Europe, but it might well have applied to Spanish artist Joan Miro – minus the gaiety.

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Alberto Giacometti sculptures: core exercises

Alberto Giacometti, ‘Place,’ 1948-1949, bronze, 21 × 63.5 × 44 cm, Emanuel Hoffmann-Stiftung, Depositum in der Öffentlichen Kunstsammlung Basel, © Succession Alberto Giacometti / 2015, ProLitteris, Zurich, Foto: Martin P. Bühler, Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel

 

Alberto Giacometti became one of the most important artists of the 20th century due in large part to the undisputedly unique qualities of his sculptures, which have assured an enduring legacy.

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10 facts about pulp fiction’s illustrious Margaret Brundage

Original art by Margaret Brundage of ‘Weird Tales,’ ‘The Six Sleepers,’ circa 1935, realized $19,375 at auction in 2013, through Heritage Auctions.

 

1. Margaret Brundage was the primary designer of covers for the pulp fiction magazine Weird Tales throughout much of the 1930s, and into the 1940s. She was a pioneer of the pulp era, becoming its first female cover artist. Her covers drew attention and sparked controversy. They often depicted scantily clad female characters—many times in treacherous situations—associated with one of the magazine’s “tales.”

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Overbeck pottery: pure Arts & Crafts

An abstract landscape of houses is the subject matter on this unusual bowl. Measuring 5 inches in diameter, the bowl has the impressed OBK mark on the bottom. Image courtesy Treadway Toomey

 

Working from their modest home in east-central Indiana, the Overbeck family of artists produced a relatively small, but highly regarded, amount of art pottery in the first quarter of the 20th century.

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7 things you should know about Tiffin Modern glass lines

The 6553 Flower Basket in Ruby and Crystal was one of the most popular pieces from the Empress line. This basket has an engraved monogram “H” on one side. Image by Tom Hoepf

The 6553 Flower Basket in Ruby and Crystal was one of the most popular pieces from the Empress line. This basket has an engraved monogram “H” on one side. Image by Tom Hoepf

 

Listings for Tiffin Glass in antiques price guides always mention the company’s black satin glass produced in the 1920s, but in recent years collectors have paid more attention to its art glass made during the 1940s and ’50s.

It was an era of glassmaking in Tiffin marked by continued fine quality, brilliant colors and innovative designs. The most intriguing of these are loosely called Tiffin’s Modern lines.

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7 things you didn’t know about Argy-Rousseau

Argy-Rousseau pate-de-verre diffuser, fan form with stylized flowers. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Argy-Rousseau pate-de-verre diffuser, fan form with stylized flowers. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

 

Gabriel Argy-Rousseau (French, 1885-1953) was a sculptor, ceramicist and master glass artisan who played an important role in the early-20th-century art glass movement. His innovative designs, which included vases, lamps, jewelry, bowls and other decorative objects, spanned both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods.

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4 Most Popular Types of Political Memorabilia

2016’s contentious political campaigns and the candidates’ saturation TV ads will soon be history, but collectors will see to it that the memorabilia left behind lives to see another day. Presidential campaign mementos – the signs, banners, buttons, hats and other ephemera produced to publicize candidates and fire up voters – rank among the few things besides rocks and bottles that collectors can pick up for free. In fact, there are diehard collectors who, like Deadheads, go from city to city following campaigners and collecting free memorabilia printed or manufactured specifically for a particular region.

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Judith Leiber has firm hand on artful minaudieres

Chronicling the career of Hungarian-American accessory creator Judith Leiber (b. 1921-), the Thames and Hudson Dictionary of Fashion and Fashion Designers concluded, “It is her whimsical rhinestone-studded evening bags, often crafted in the form of minaudieres, which have brought her lasting fame. Brightly colored, small-scale and delicate yet sturdily engineered, they are covered with handset Austrian crystal and semiprecious stones, duplicating flora and fauna.”

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