10 facts about pulp fiction’s illustrious Margaret Brundage

Original art by Margaret Brundage of ‘Weird Tales,’ ‘The Six Sleepers,’ circa 1935, realized $19,375 at auction in 2013, through Heritage Auctions.

 

1. Margaret Brundage was the primary designer of covers for the pulp fiction magazine Weird Tales throughout much of the 1930s, and into the 1940s. She was a pioneer of the pulp era, becoming its first female cover artist. Her covers drew attention and sparked controversy. They often depicted scantily clad female characters—many times in treacherous situations—associated with one of the magazine’s “tales.”

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Overbeck pottery: pure Arts & Crafts

An abstract landscape of houses is the subject matter on this unusual bowl. Measuring 5 inches in diameter, the bowl has the impressed OBK mark on the bottom. Image courtesy Treadway Toomey

 

Working from their modest home in east-central Indiana, the Overbeck family of artists produced a relatively small, but highly regarded, amount of art pottery in the first quarter of the 20th century.

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7 things you should know about Tiffin Modern glass lines

The 6553 Flower Basket in Ruby and Crystal was one of the most popular pieces from the Empress line. This basket has an engraved monogram “H” on one side. Image by Tom Hoepf

The 6553 Flower Basket in Ruby and Crystal was one of the most popular pieces from the Empress line. This basket has an engraved monogram “H” on one side. Image by Tom Hoepf

 

Listings for Tiffin Glass in antiques price guides always mention the company’s black satin glass produced in the 1920s, but in recent years collectors have paid more attention to its art glass made during the 1940s and ’50s.

It was an era of glassmaking in Tiffin marked by continued fine quality, brilliant colors and innovative designs. The most intriguing of these are loosely called Tiffin’s Modern lines.

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7 things you didn’t know about Argy-Rousseau

Argy-Rousseau pate-de-verre diffuser, fan form with stylized flowers. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Argy-Rousseau pate-de-verre diffuser, fan form with stylized flowers. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

 

Gabriel Argy-Rousseau (French, 1885-1953) was a sculptor, ceramicist and master glass artisan who played an important role in the early-20th-century art glass movement. His innovative designs, which included vases, lamps, jewelry, bowls and other decorative objects, spanned both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods.

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4 Most Popular Types of Political Memorabilia

2016’s contentious political campaigns and the candidates’ saturation TV ads will soon be history, but collectors will see to it that the memorabilia left behind lives to see another day. Presidential campaign mementos – the signs, banners, buttons, hats and other ephemera produced to publicize candidates and fire up voters – rank among the few things besides rocks and bottles that collectors can pick up for free. In fact, there are diehard collectors who, like Deadheads, go from city to city following campaigners and collecting free memorabilia printed or manufactured specifically for a particular region.

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Judith Leiber has firm hand on artful minaudieres

Chronicling the career of Hungarian-American accessory creator Judith Leiber (b. 1921-), the Thames and Hudson Dictionary of Fashion and Fashion Designers concluded, “It is her whimsical rhinestone-studded evening bags, often crafted in the form of minaudieres, which have brought her lasting fame. Brightly colored, small-scale and delicate yet sturdily engineered, they are covered with handset Austrian crystal and semiprecious stones, duplicating flora and fauna.”

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Tulane professor sparked revival in Mexican silver

Beginning in the 1930s, workshops clustered in the mining town of Taxco, Mexico spearheaded a revival in traditional silver craft. At the same time, the artists and artisans working there took a new direction in design that mixed age-old motifs from native cultures with 20th-century Modernism.

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Picasso left lasting mark on Madoura art pottery

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) had a restless artistic temperament and continually sought out new forms to which his inspiration could be applied. A chance meeting on the French Riviera after World War II revealed the possibilities of clay as a receptive surface for Picasso’s art. His decorative ceramic designs were executed in numerous limited editions, increasingly in demand for collections of 20th century art, where they hold their own alongside multimillion-dollar paintings.

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Tiffany lamps hold value through dark economic turns

Tiffany lamps are magical artifacts in the collecting world. Illuminate one, and all the creative passion that went into its conception electrifies the viewer today.

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Chinese jade: the mystery behind its enduring attraction

Jade is at the center of a story of money and magic that goes back over 8,000 years. In China, its use dates back to the Neolithic period, between 6000 and 5000 B.C.

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