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Campana Brothers, No. 1/3 Settimo Cabinet, estimated at €50,000-€70,000 ($54,000-$76,000) at Piasa June 27.

Campana Brothers No. 1/3 Settimo Cabinet leads our five lots to watch

Campana Brothers, No. 1/3 Settimo Cabinet

PARIS – Fernando (1961-2022) and Humberto Campana (b. 1953-) were the first South American designers to make a mark in the high-end European furniture space. Their Sao Paulo, Brazil-based design firm Estudio Campana was known for ‘disruptive design’ – pushing the boundaries of what things should look like – while embracing traditional Brazilian craft styles.

On Thursday, June 27, Piasa presents Fernando e Humberto Campana, Selected Design, a highly curated 49-lot event featuring some of the brothers’ most revered designs. Leading the sale as the top-estimated lot is the No. 1/3 Settimo Cabinet. The piece was created for the Les frères Campana, Barroco Rococó exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, in 2012. It stands 74in in height and is made of the unique combination of gilded bronze and bamboo. Piasa has assigned a presale estimate of €50,000-€70,000 ($54,000-$76,000).

Douglas MacArthur’s Pre-World War I Dog Tag

Douglas MacArthur’s pre-World War I dog tag, estimated at $5,000-$10,000 at Milestone Auctions June 29.
Douglas MacArthur’s pre-World War I dog tag, estimated at $5,000-$10,000 at Milestone Auctions June 29.

WILLOUGHBY, OH – Douglas MacArthur’s United States Army-issued dog tag is a featured lot at Milestone Auctions Spring Premier Military Sale, a 687-lot sale being held Saturday, June 29. 

The round-format dog tag predates the more commonly seen rounded-corner rectangular version issued from World War II onward. The tag reads ‘Douglas MacArthur 1st. LT. Corps Of Engin. U.S.A.’, and measures about three-quarters of the size of World War I dog tags. MacArthur would have worn it while serving under his father in the Philippines in the prewar period. MacArthur (1880-1964) and his father, Arthur MacArthur, Jr., are the only father and son to both receive the Medal of Honor in American military history. 

George Rodrigue, ‘Miss Arceneaux's Girls School’

George Rodrigue, ‘Miss Arceneaux's Girls School,’ estimated at $30,000-$50,000 at Neal Auction Company June 28.
George Rodrigue, ‘Miss Arceneaux's Girls School,’ estimated at $30,000-$50,000 at Neal Auction Company June 28.

NEW ORLEANS – George Rodrigue (1944-2013) is best remembered for his striking and iconic Blue Dog series of paintings featuring a wide-eyed canine in a dizzying range of settings and set-ups. But Rodrigue also had a fascination with school class portraits, beginning with his first work based on his mother’s 1924 graduating class portrait from New Iberia, Louisiana, The Class of Marie Courregé.

Neal Auction Company sold The Class of Marie Courregé in 2019 for $125,000 ($160,000 with buyer’s premium), and will bring Miss Arceneaux’s Girls School to market Friday, June 28 as a featured lot in its Premier Estates Collection sale. The 30 by 40in oil on canvas was created in 1973 and is set in a classic Cajun outdoor setting, though the inspiration came from a vintage photograph of a school class in New England. Rodrigue documented the creation of this work, and photographs exist of the in-process painting with the Louisiana bayou foliage already complete and the girls and the matron still in sketched form.

Neal estimates Miss Arceneaux’s Girls School at $30,000-$50,000, a likely conservative prediction given the 2019 performance of The Class of Marie Courregé and rising marketplace demand for the work of Rodrigue.

Lunkenheimer Three-chime Steam Whistle

Pennsylvania Railroad Lunkenheimer three-chime steam whistle, estimated at $4,000-$6,000 at Rail & Road Auctions June 27-28.
Pennsylvania Railroad Lunkenheimer three-chime steam whistle, estimated at $4,000-$6,000 at Rail & Road Auctions June 27-28.

LAFAYETTE, IN – The sale at Rail & Road Auctions on Thursday, June 27 and Friday, June 28 includes this original Lunkenheimer three-chime steam whistle with a full Pennsylvania Railroad provenance. 

Fashioned in brass or bronze with a diameter of 8in, it was used for almost 60 years to announce shift changes, lunch times, and emergencies at the East Altoona Roundhouse in East Altoona, Pennsylvania. The building was once the world’s largest roundhouse, with a full circle of about 50 stalls with two through tracks. It was demolished in 1961. 

The consignor has provided a full history for the whistle, including its purchase in Dayton, Ohio, by a Philadelphia collector in 1971, its sale via eBay in 2001, and its use in August 2012 on the Nickel Plate Berkshire no. 765 during an excursion for Norfolk Southern Railroad employees at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. It is estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

Circa-1946 Wurlitzer Model 1015 ‘Bubbler’ 78rpm Jukebox

Circa-1946 Wurlitzer Model 1015 ‘bubbler’ 78rpm jukebox, estimated at $6,000-$8,000 at John Moran Auctioneers June 25.
Circa-1946 Wurlitzer Model 1015 ‘bubbler’ 78rpm jukebox, estimated at $6,000-$8,000 at John Moran Auctioneers June 25.

MONROVIA, CA – Rudolph Wurlitzer (1831-1914) was born into music, with his German family hand-crafting instruments in a family business. At the age of just 24, Wurlitzer emigrated to the United States and soon had a burgeoning business creating instruments for a wide range of clients, including the United States Army, which used his products to make music during both the American Civil War and Spanish-American War. His North Tonawana, New York factory was a leader in both piano and organ manufacture, so much so that the ‘Mighty Wurlitzer’ organ became synonymous with soundtrack creation in silent movie houses.

Wurlitzer designer Paul Fuller had specialized in jukebox design for the company prior to World War II, when it favored streamline moderne designs. Wartime material restrictions relegated Wurlitzer to bland products such as 1942’s Victory jukebox. But with the war’s end in 1945, Fuller geared up for a sensational new release – the Model 1015.

With its 24-disc 78rpm selection of singles and its groundbreaking use of thermoplastics that encased the hypnotic bubbling tubes surrounding the unit’s face, which gave rise to its ‘Bubbler’ nickname, the 1015 was an immediate hit, with Wurlitzer selling a staggering 56,000 units between 1946 and 1947.

John Moran Auctioneers brings a circa-1946 Wurlizter Model 1015 jukebox to market as a featured lot in its ReDesigned sale scheduled for Tuesday, June 25. Despite the huge number of surviving post-WWII vintage 1015s and their reissuance by Wurlitzer in later years – even today, with the reconstituted Wurlitzer helmed by three descendants of Rudolph – 1015s continue to command strong prices on the open market. Moran estimates this 1015, in original and aged condition, at $6,000-$8,000.