Book, ‘The Wonders of Yosemite Valley, and of California,’ Samuel Kneeland, illustrated with 20 mounted original albumen photographs credited to John P. Soule, tissue guards, 1872, 10 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches. Price realized: $14,400. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Live AuctionTalk: Yosemite

Book, ‘The Wonders of Yosemite Valley, and of California,’ Samuel Kneeland, illustrated with 20 mounted original albumen photographs credited to John P. Soule, tissue guards, 1872, 10 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches. Price realized: $14,400. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Book, ‘The Wonders of Yosemite Valley, and of California,’ Samuel Kneeland, illustrated with 20 mounted original albumen photographs credited to John P. Soule, tissue guards, 1872, 10 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches. Price realized: $14,400. Photo courtesy of PBA.

SANTA FE, N.M. – When naturalist-author John Muir decided to write about Yosemite Park in 1911 he agonized over how to capture the magic of the place in words. He decided it would take a whole book to pull it off.

Where to begin?

Muir determined the most dramatic aspect of the park was Yosemite’s dozen waterfalls. Of all the falls it was Nevada Falls that held the most magic for him.

“This noble fall has far the richest, as well as the most powerful, voice of all the falls in the valley,” he said.

Native Americans believed Muir would have been a great medicine man in his day because he was listening, truly listening. He wasn’t exploring. He was learning. He would have been one of those elders the kids gathered around as he talked to the rocks and trees and listened to the waterfalls. The children, they say, would have loved his stories. They wouldn’t have called him crazy.

“But no temple made with hands can compare with Yosemite,” Muir said in the introduction to his guidebook “The Yosemite.” “Every rock in its walls seems to glow with life.”

Muir, like the Native Americans before and after him, considered the forests of Yosemite sacred, a place to commune with nature, a place of contemplation. A preservationist, Muir wanted the land used as a park, free of logging, grazing and hunting.

The land’s value was spiritual not practical for Muir. He had seen much devastation in the Sierra Nevada by the sheep and lumber syndicates and was skeptical of their motives and whether they could actually be controlled.

Muir was nicknamed the “Prophet of the Wilderness,” an “unknown nobody” who stepped up as the voice of conservation.

Yosemite wasn’t the world’s first national park. Yellowstone was. But Yellowstone’s creation as a national park came eight years after Yosemite was set aside by Congress and entrusted to California.

Muir’s hero, writer Ralph Waldo Emerson, showed up in 1871with an entourage and rode on horseback to many of Yosemite’s sites. At Muir’s invitation Emerson visited the tiny loft in the sawmill Muir called home.

Here was a man living out what Emerson decided was the life he preached about in his writings with a direct connection to the currents of the cosmos. Here was a man “firmly believing that “every one of its (Yosemite’s) living creatures … and every crystal of its rocks … is throbbing and pulsing with the heartbeats of God,” Muir said. Emerson could not have said it better.

Muir’s relationship with the old sage was more bemused father and eager son than between two equals. Nonetheless, there was a heartfelt connection and a deep respect for the land between the men.

As Emerson’s group rode off toward civilization and away from Yosemite Emerson lagged behind and waved a last goodbye to Muir with his hat before disappearing over a ridge.

On Oct. 9, a presentation copy of John Muir’s book The Yosemite went on the block at PBA Galleries and sold for $18,000. The book was inscribed by John Muir to Lucretia Perry Osborn, wife of Henry Fairfield Osborn, noted zoologist-professor and Muir’s friend.

Here are current values for other Yosemite items sold in the auction:

– Photograph, El Capitan, glass plate positive photograph, circa 1880-1900, 33 3/4 inches by 25 1/2 inches, $1,800.

– Albumen photograph, buildings in Yosemite, circa 1878, 5 inches diameter, $3,000.

– Book with photographs, Ansel Adams, Sierra Nevada, 50 tipped-in plates from photographs of John Muir Trail with tissue-guards, 1938, 16 1/4 inches by 12 1/4 inches, $3,600.

– Book, The Wonders of Yosemite Valley, and of California, Samuel Kneeland, illustrated with 20 mounted original albumen photographs credited to John P. Soule, tissue guards, 1872, 10 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches, $14,400.




ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Book, ‘The Wonders of Yosemite Valley, and of California,’ Samuel Kneeland, illustrated with 20 mounted original albumen photographs credited to John P. Soule, tissue guards, 1872, 10 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches. Price realized: $14,400. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Book, ‘The Wonders of Yosemite Valley, and of California,’ Samuel Kneeland, illustrated with 20 mounted original albumen photographs credited to John P. Soule, tissue guards, 1872, 10 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches. Price realized: $14,400. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Photograph, ‘El Capitan,’ glass plate positive photograph, circa 1880-1900, 3 3/4 inches by 25 1/2 inches. Price realized: $1,800. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Photograph, ‘El Capitan,’ glass plate positive photograph, circa 1880-1900, 3 3/4 inches by 25 1/2 inches. Price realized: $1,800. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Albumen photograph, buildings in Yosemite, circa 1878, 5 inches diameter. Price realized: $3,000. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Albumen photograph, buildings in Yosemite, circa 1878, 5 inches diameter. Price realized: $3,000. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Book with photographs, Ansel Adams, ‘Sierra Nevada,’ 50 tipped-in plates from photographs of John Muir Trail with tissue-guards, 1938, 16 1/4 inches by 12 1/4 inches. Price realized: $3,600. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Book with photographs, Ansel Adams, ‘Sierra Nevada,’ 50 tipped-in plates from photographs of John Muir Trail with tissue-guards, 1938, 16 1/4 inches by 12 1/4 inches. Price realized: $3,600. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Book, ‘The Yosemite’, presentation copy, John Muir, inscribed by Muir to Lucretia Perry Osborn, wife of Henry Fairfield Osborn, noted zoologist-professor and Muir's friend. Price realized: $18,000. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Book, ‘The Yosemite’, presentation copy, John Muir, inscribed by Muir to Lucretia Perry Osborn, wife of Henry Fairfield Osborn, noted zoologist-professor and Muir’s friend. Price realized: $18,000. Photo courtesy of PBA.

Pumpkin lady candy container, Germany, pumpkin head with black hat, 5 inches long, $1,062. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Live Auction Talk: Halloween treats

Pumpkin lady candy container, Germany, pumpkin head with black hat, 5 inches long, $1,062. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Pumpkin lady candy container, Germany, pumpkin head with black hat, 5 inches long, $1,062. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “I bet living in a nudist colony takes all the fun out of Halloween.”

I wish I had said that. The author is unknown.

Think about it. These folks can’t dress up and pretend to be somebody else for a few hours. That’s part of the magic of Halloween.

Of course we know Halloween isn’t just about kids. An estimated 65 percent of American adults participate in the holiday. After Christmas, it’s the second biggest retail jackpot.

The history of many of our holidays is obvious, but did anyone talk much about Halloween?

It seems the Celts, 2,000 years ago, marked the end of summer and the start of winter with a festival called Samhein. The Celts believed the ghosts of their ancestors came back to walk the earth on October 31. It was the same day the spirits of those who died during the year could travel to the underworld.

Some spirits were friendly. Some were not. An additional plate was placed at the dinner table for agreeable Casper-like ghosts, and the path to the front door was lit for them. Evil ghosts liked to wreak havoc by doing disturbing deeds like scaring people to death and destroying crops. Some ghosts were even said to demonically possess the bodies of the living and force them to act out in bizarre ways.

Somehow all of these ghosts, it is said, enabled druid priests to predict the future and their prophecies boosted the faith of the clans during unforgiving weather.

The clans also gathered at night around a campfire. They built huge bonfires to welcome the good spirits and frigid weather. They sacrificed animals and crops to the gods and dressed up in animal heads and pelts, and partied. They also wore masks to hide from evil spirits (banshees) lingering in the dark.

“There is nothing that gives more assurance than a mask,” the writer Collette said.

When the Irish came to America pumpkins were easier to find than the turnips they traditionally carved the center out of and placed candles inside. They believed evil spirits were afraid of light and these lanterns helped scare the bad ghosts away.

Nowadays, Halloween gives everybody the chance to dress up and act out their individual fantasies, if they so choose.

Stashed away in my storage shed, I’m sure I could lay my hands on it, is a box of tin Halloween noisemakers and other flights of Halloween fancy from the 1950s. When I lift these tin wonders out of their box I’m transported directly back to childhood, the cold air, and an impatient kid getting all dressed up as she heads out the front door.

On Sept. 19-20, Bertoia Auctions featured a selection of Halloween novelties in its Fall Festival sale. Here are some current values:

– Bobblehead man, candy container, Germany, 7 inches high, $177.

– Decorations, seven items including black cat, drum lanterns, pumpkin noisemaker, etc., $472.

– Pumpkin lady, candy container, Germany, pumpkin head with black hat, 5 inches long, $1,062.

– Black cat/pumpkin, candy container, postwar, 8 inches long, $1,534.

– Halloween items, hard plastic, witches on motorcycles, rocket ship, pumpkin coach, other assorted candy containers, 5 inches to 9 inches long, $3,835.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Pumpkin lady candy container, Germany, pumpkin head with black hat, 5 inches long, $1,062. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Pumpkin lady candy container, Germany, pumpkin head with black hat, 5 inches long, $1,062. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Bobblehead man, candy container, Germany, 7 inches high, $177. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Bobblehead man, candy container, Germany, 7 inches high, $177. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Decorations, seven in the lot, black cat, drum lanterns, pumpkin noisemaker, etc., $472. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Decorations, seven in the lot, black cat, drum lanterns, pumpkin noisemaker, etc., $472. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Black cat/pumpkin candy container, postwar, 8 inches long, $1,534. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Black cat/pumpkin candy container, postwar, 8 inches long, $1,534. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Halloween items: witches on motorcycles, rocket ship, pumpkin coach, other assorted candy containers, 5 inches to 9 inches long, $3,835. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Halloween items: witches on motorcycles, rocket ship, pumpkin coach, other assorted candy containers, 5 inches to 9 inches long, $3,835. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Color lithograph poster, ‘Harry Houdini King of Cards,’ Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Live Auction Talk: Harry Houdini

Color lithograph poster, ‘Harry Houdini King of Cards,’ Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Color lithograph poster, ‘Harry Houdini King of Cards,’ Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “The moment you doubt whether you can fly, you cease for ever to be able to do it.” ― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Harry Houdini showed the world how to fly cloaked in chains and shackles. The magician stunned audiences worldwide with his daredevil antics.

His world was about possibilities.

Houdini had a fascination with death and flirted with it constantly in his escape acts. He coaxed crowds to vicariously join him in that gamble. With hearts pounding they did.

That’s magic.

Houdini’s “Double-fold Death Defying Water Mystery” was a showstopper. The bulky wooden crate had four heavy locks built into the lid lock along with hasps for four more padlocks.

During the performance a large metal milk can filled with water was lowered into the crate. The performer stepped into the can and the lid was sealed. Next the padlocks on the crate were locked. Then a cloth cabinet was drawn around the crate. Like a bank vault, it seemed impossible to penetrate.

After what seemed like too long, the front curtain was pulled aside and there stood the magician soaked in water and sweat. Houdini devised the apparatus after his Milk Can escape.

“The easiest way to attract a crowd is to let it be known that at a given time and a given place someone is going to attempt something that in the event of failure will mean sudden death,” Houdini said.

Always walking right up to the edge of the cliff and teetering over. Always looking for ways to raise the stakes. That was Houdini. His main goal he said was to conquer fear.

Shackled in handcuffs, leg irons, chains, ropes and locks, nothing seemed to stop the magician.

Madness also fascinated Houdini. It wasn’t enough to be strapped inside a straitjacket or a bag-style “punishment suit” a few times a week. He visited insane asylums on occasion and feared ending up there himself. Houdini drew up a testament directing his money to be divided between his wife Bess and his brother Hardeen should he suffer any “sickness which may hurt my mind.”

This conjures up the image of a pretty edgy guy always testing the limits. He turned magic into high art with his energy and it showed up on stage.

“I make the most money in Russia and Paris,” Houdini said, “for the people in those countries are so willing to be amused, so eager to see something new and out of the ordinary.”

Maybe they hadn’t lost their childlike sense of wonder, still open to the possibilities.

When Houdini died in 1926 at age 52, most of his magic apparatus and escape devices went to his brother, who spent 18 years gifting and selling the items to magicians and collectors.

On Aug. 23, Potter & Potter Auctions, Chicago, featured its Houdiniana auction. Here are some current values for Houdini memorabilia:

– Photograph, a young seated Houdini dressed in coat and tie with a white dog, in cabinet card format, 3 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches, $3,840.

– Photograph, full-length portrait, a young Houdini, chained and shackled, wearing only a loincloth, circa 1902, 3 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches, $4,800.

– Color lithograph poster, ‘Buried Alive!’ escape from a coffin buried under the earth, a stunt Houdini would not live long enough to perform, Otis Litho, circa 1924, eight-sheet, 86 inches by 109 inches, $9,600.

– Color lithograph poster, Harry Houdini King of Cards, Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400.

– Double-Fold Death Defying Water Mystery Trick, heavy wooden crate with trapezoidal lid, copied by other magicians trading on Houdini’s fame and reputation, American, circa 1909, 29 1/4 inches by 38 1/2 inches, $66,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Color lithograph poster, ‘Harry Houdini King of Cards,’ Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Color lithograph poster, ‘Harry Houdini King of Cards,’ Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Photograph, young Houdini cabinet card format, 3 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches, $3,840. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Photograph, young Houdini cabinet card format, 3 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches, $3,840. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Photograph, young Houdini chained and shackled, circa 1902, 3 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches,  $4,800. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Photograph, young Houdini chained and shackled, circa 1902, 3 1/4 inches by 6 3/4 inches, $4,800. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Color lithograph poster, ‘Buried Alive!’ an escape from a coffin buried under the earth, Otis Litho, circa 1924, eight-sheet, 86 inches by 109 inches, $9,600. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Color lithograph poster, ‘Buried Alive!’ an escape from a coffin buried under the earth, Otis Litho, circa 1924, eight-sheet, 86 inches by 109 inches, $9,600. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Double-Fold Death Defying Water Mystery Trick, heavy wooden crate with lid, American, circa 1909, 29 1/4 inches by 38 1/2 inches, $66,000. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Double-Fold Death Defying Water Mystery Trick, heavy wooden crate with lid, American, circa 1909, 29 1/4 inches by 38 1/2 inches, $66,000. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

Lily table lamp, 18-light, Favrile, 21 1/2 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie's, New York.

Live Auction Talk: Louis Comfort Tiffany

Lily table lamp, 18-light, Favrile, 21 1/2 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie's, New York.

Lily table lamp, 18-light, Favrile, 21 1/2 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie’s, New York.

SANTA FE, N.M. – If you collected Louis Comfort Tiffany 65-years-ago you would be a multimillionaire today. In general people didn’t appreciate the swirling lines and patterns of Art Nouveau design and much of Tiffany’s work was Art Nouveau, which fell out of fashion.

Over the years his stained glass windows, lamps, and glass mosaics ended up in garbage dumps like last week’s leftovers. It has been estimated that only 10 per cent of Tiffany’s ware survive. Many of his unique pieces vanished totally.

With the iridescent glass he called Favrile, Tiffany created his own new kind of glass. Not an easy task. Glass technology often evolves by accident and craftsmen imitate the process not really understanding the process. That wasn’t the case with Louis.

Tiffany came to glass design through jewelry making. His father, Charles Lewis Tiffany, opened a shop in New York in 1837. He sold stationary and luxury goods. Charles used his income from selling high-end imports to set up workshops and train local craftsmen. By 1848 he was making his own jewelry and by the 1860s it became the biggest business of its kind in America.

Louis, his son, was more artist than businessman. Landscape art was his first love. How to saturate his landscapes in light in a way never before seen plagued him. Windows, he said, like murals should inspire as well as educate. With glass and the see-through effects of light he could achieve the rich color he longed for in a way he could not pull off in mural painting.

That was the power of working with glass.

“Color is to the eye what music is to the ear,” he said. And Louis rivaled the painter’s palette with glass. The spontaneous, unexpected effects of working with it was pure magic to him.

He started out studying painting in the Paris studio of George Inness. He also appreciated seeing artists and craftsmen working together like William Morris set up in his workshop in the early era of the arts and crafts movement.

Louis founded his factory in Queens, N.Y., in 1878. Coming from money gave him an edge. His decorating projects included Mark Twain’s house in Hartford, Conn., and the White House under president Chester Arthur. From interior design he moved into glassmaking and from windows Tiffany moved into luxury lamps.

Louis understood the glass technology process itself but he never actually blew glass himself or cast it. His craftsmen did.

Originally they used pieces of glass leftover from windows to make stained glass lamps. Then they realized people wanted the lamps and they could be a key part of the production line. Some lampshades had as many as 1,000 separate pieces of glass in them. Consumers would pay as much as $500 for one of these fancy lamps.

Louis was always experimenting. And if his glass lamps and vases were beautifully crafted enough it would fulfill his ultimate goal of bringing beauty into the home through glass and light.

Tiffany liked pulling off impossible tasks and he did. On June 12 a selection of Tiffany lamps went on the block at Christie’s, New York. Here are some current values.

– Lily table lamp, 18-light, Favrile, base stamped Tiffany Studios New York, circa 1910, 21 1/2 inches high. Price realized: $68,750.

– Lotus table lamp, leaded glass, base stamped Tiffany Studios New York, circa 1910, 22 inches high. Price realized: $68,750.

– Pony Wisteria table lamp, leaded glass, base stamped Tiffany Studios New York, circa 1910, 17 inches high. Price realized: $87,500.

– Wisteria table lamp, leaded glass, base stamped Tiffany Studios New York, circa 1905, 27 inches high. Price realized: $437,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Lily table lamp, 18-light, Favrile, 21 1/2 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie's, New York.

Lily table lamp, 18-light, Favrile, 21 1/2 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie’s, New York.

Lotus table lamp, leaded glass, 22 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie's, New York.

Lotus table lamp, leaded glass, 22 inches high. Price realized: $68,750. Photo courtesy of Christie’s, New York.

Pony Wisteria table lamp, leaded glass, 17 inches high, $87,500. Photo courtesy of Christie's, New York.

Pony Wisteria table lamp, leaded glass, 17 inches high, $87,500. Photo courtesy of Christie’s, New York.

Wisteria table lamp, leaded glass, 27 inches high. Price realized: $437,000. Photo courtesy of Christie's, New York.

Wisteria table lamp, leaded glass, 27 inches high. Price realized: $437,000. Photo courtesy of Christie’s, New York.

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Live Auction Talk: Popeye the Sailor

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “I’m strong to the finish, ’cause I eats me spinach, I’m Popeye the sailor man!”

All seriousness aside, if you grew up in the 1950s you probably remember this character and his cartoons. Popeye, Olive Oyl, Bluto, Wimpy, and Swee’pee lived in that simple world where simple values ruled.

Popeye wasn’t all that smart, good looking or buff, but he won the hearts of fans anyway. He was the underdog who stood up for himself and didn’t get creamed.

“Tha’s all I can stands, ’cause I can’t stands no more,” is a famous Popeye one-liner.

How often have you been there in life? Popeye’s sense of fair play was noble. Despite all odds, this spinach-obsessed half-pint was willing to take on the brute.

And then there’s his beloved Olive Oyl. Olive Oyl is the antithesis of the voluptuous beauty as we define it in this culture. Skinny as a rail, she looks like she hasn’t eaten in months. And fickle as all get out. Still, she managed to capture the little guy’s heart with a simple kiss on the cheek.

Popeye actually made his first debut on Jan. 17, 1929 in Elzie Segar’s carton strip Thimble Theatre. The strip originally revolved around Olive Oyl’s family, but Popeye soon eclipsed his love as star of the show.

He then moved to the big screen in 1933 in the Betty Boop cartoon Popeye the Sailor.

Talk about art reflecting life. This one is too good. Spinach growers credited Popeye with a 33 percent increase in U.S. spinach cunsumption in the 1930s, rescuing the spinach industry during the Great Depression. As much as I cherished Popeye as a kid, my eating habits weren’t reflected in those statistics. I hated canned spinach, and had to sit it out at the kitchen table until my plate was clean anyway.

Our hero with the bulging forearms was also a patriot who joined the Navy in 1941, appearing in a number of shorts in his starchy white uniform.

Famous Studios produced the cartoon from 1942 to 1957. In 1960, King Features Syndicate stepped in creating 220 Popeye the Sailor cartoons for television syndication.

From the 1930s to the 1960s Popeye reigned as one of the most popular cartoon characters ever. His cartoon appeared in 638 newspapers around the country.

In 1995 the U.S. Postal Service honored  Popeye with his own stamp. And the whole Popeye crew sailed to Orlando in 1999 to be showcased in the opening of Universal’s “Islands of Adventure” theme park.

How cool is that? The little guy made it in spades. Even artists like Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Jeff Koons honored the man on canvas.

As a cartoon, Popeye’s star seems to be fading. He’s appearing in fewer newspapers. But as a collectible, he’s still very much alive.

On May 9-10, Bertoia Auctions, Vineland, N.J., featured a selection of Popeye toys in its toy auction. Here are some current values

– Popeye Playing Basketball, Linemar, lithographed tin, Japan, 9 inches high: $767.

– Popeye wooden figure with Donald Duck wooden figure, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions, box included, each 4 inches high: $767.

– Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven, 7 inches high: $1,121.

– Popeye Express, Louis Marx, features tunnels, trestle bridge and Popeye characters, lithographed tin, copr. King Features Syndicate, 10 inches diameter: $1,652.

– Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin, 9 1/2 inches high, boxed examples: $1,652.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye playing basketball, Linemar, Japan: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye playing basketball, Linemar, Japan: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye with Donald Duck wooden figures, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye with Donald Duck wooden figures, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Express, Louis Marx, lithographed tin windup: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Express, Louis Marx, lithographed tin windup: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

 

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Live Auction Talk: Popeye the Sailor

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “I’m strong to the finish, ’cause I eats me spinach, I’m Popeye the sailor man!”

All seriousness aside, if you grew up in the 1950s you probably remember this character and his cartoons. Popeye, Olive Oyl, Bluto, Wimpy, and Swee’pee lived in that simple world where simple values ruled.

Popeye wasn’t all that smart, good looking or buff, but he won the hearts of fans anyway. He was the underdog who stood up for himself and didn’t get creamed.

“Tha’s all I can stands, ’cause I can’t stands no more,” is a famous Popeye one-liner.

How often have you been there in life? Popeye’s sense of fair play was noble. Despite all odds, this spinach-obsessed half-pint was willing to take on the brute.

And then there’s his beloved Olive Oyl. Olive Oyl is the antithesis of the voluptuous beauty as we define it in this culture. Skinny as a rail, she looks like she hasn’t eaten in months. And fickle as all get out. Still, she managed to capture the little guy’s heart with a simple kiss on the cheek.

Popeye actually made his first debut on Jan. 17, 1929 in Elzie Segar’s carton strip Thimble Theatre. The strip originally revolved around Olive Oyl’s family, but Popeye soon eclipsed his love as star of the show.

He then moved to the big screen in 1933 in the Betty Boop cartoon Popeye the Sailor.

Talk about art reflecting life. This one is too good. Spinach growers credited Popeye with a 33 percent increase in U.S. spinach cunsumption in the 1930s, rescuing the spinach industry during the Great Depression. As much as I cherished Popeye as a kid, my eating habits weren’t reflected in those statistics. I hated canned spinach, and had to sit it out at the kitchen table until my plate was clean anyway.

Our hero with the bulging forearms was also a patriot who joined the Navy in 1941, appearing in a number of shorts in his starchy white uniform.

Famous Studios produced the cartoon from 1942 to 1957. In 1960, King Features Syndicate stepped in creating 220 Popeye the Sailor cartoons for television syndication.

From the 1930s to the 1960s Popeye reigned as one of the most popular cartoon characters ever. His cartoon appeared in 638 newspapers around the country.

In 1995 the U.S. Postal Service honored  Popeye with his own stamp. And the whole Popeye crew sailed to Orlando in 1999 to be showcased in the opening of Universal’s “Islands of Adventure” theme park.

How cool is that? The little guy made it in spades. Even artists like Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Jeff Koons honored the man on canvas.

As a cartoon, Popeye’s star seems to be fading. He’s appearing in fewer newspapers. But as a collectible, he’s still very much alive.

On May 9-10, Bertoia Auctions, Vineland, N.J., featured a selection of Popeye toys in its toy auction. Here are some current values

– Popeye Playing Basketball, Linemar, lithographed tin, Japan, 9 inches high: $767.

– Popeye wooden figure with Donald Duck wooden figure, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions, box included, each 4 inches high: $767.

– Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven, 7 inches high: $1,121.

– Popeye Express, Louis Marx, features tunnels, trestle bridge and Popeye characters, lithographed tin, copr. King Features Syndicate, 10 inches diameter: $1,652.

– Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin, 9 1/2 inches high, boxed examples: $1,652.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye playing basketball, Linemar, Japan: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye playing basketball, Linemar, Japan: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye with Donald Duck wooden figures, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye with Donald Duck wooden figures, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Express, Louis Marx, lithographed tin windup: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Express, Louis Marx, lithographed tin windup: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

 

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Live Auction Talk: The Beatles

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one. I hope someday you’ll join us. And the world will live as one.” – John Lennon

Friendship and a love of music brought the Beatles together in 1957. That spark ignited a firestorm and the world was never the same. It was an era of restlessness. That much was clear. A catalyst was in order. And that’s where the Beatles came in.

No frills, no armor. They simply addressed the world with truth in their lyrics and filled the gap.

“I think people who truly can live a life in music are telling the world, ‘You can have my love, you can have my smiles. Forget the bad parts, you don’t need them. Just take the music, the goodness, because it’s the very best, and it’s the part I give most willingly,'” said George Harrison.

The Beatles were the possibility of music going forward. And they were coaxing us to take a closer look at how we actually lived our lives.

They were already the biggest entertainment phenomena the Brits had ever seen. But no English rock band had ever come close to capturing the American music scene.

And on the plane flight to America on that chilly February day in 1964 George Harrison had been the only Beatle who had even visited America.

“They don’t know us,” Harrison said about the trip. “It’s going to be hard.”

Looking out the plane window at Kennedy airport as it landed the Beatles figured all the commotion outside had to be for somebody else. Not them.

The group was in America to appear on the Ed Sullivan Show. Sullivan was paying them half of what normal headliners got. Nothing compared to Elvis.

More than 70 million viewers were on board for the Liverpool boys and their fateful Feb. 9 appearance, 60 percent of all American television viewers. It was the largest audience for a nonnews event in television history. The group was on stage for 13 1/2 minutes performing five songs.

Everything shifted right there. The ’60s movement was on. And the news media mostly missed the point.

“Asexual and homely.” “The anti-barbershop quartet.” “An infestation.” “A fine mass placebo.” On and on went the reviews.

“They’re a passing phase, symptoms of the uncertainty of the times and the confusion about us,” said the Rev. Billy Graham.

Despite all the negative chatter the Beatles went on to become the pre-eminent pop group in the world, a cultural phenomenon of unrivaled scope. The four Brits were leaving their mark on history in a profound way.

“The thing the ’60s did was to show us the possibilities and the responsibility that we all had. It wasn’t the answer. It just gave us a glimpse of the possibility,” John Lennon said.

The Beatles were all about possibilities.

“And, in the end, the love you take, is equal to the love you make.” – Paul McCartney, The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics.

On April 26-27, Heritage Auctions a selection of Beatles memorabilia in it Entertainment auction.

Here are some current values:

– Picture sleeve, I Want to Hold Your Hand, Beatles signed, 16 1/2 inches by 16 1/2 inches: $20,000.

Please Please Me album, Beatles signed, obtained by British newspaper on Oct. 31, 1964: $40,625.

Meet the Beatles stereo LP, Beatles signed: $56,250.

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375.

– The Fab Four, inside cover of a foldover photo album, containing early glossy, Beatles signed, Feb. 9, 1964, 12 inches by 10 inches: $125,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Picture sleeve, ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand,’ Beatles signed, 16 1/2 inches by 16 1/2 inches:  $20,000. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Picture sleeve, ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand,’ Beatles signed, 16 1/2 inches by 16 1/2 inches: $20,000. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

‘Please Please Me’ album, Beatles signed: $40,625. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

‘Please Please Me’ album, Beatles signed: $40,625. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Meet the Beatles’ stereo LP, Beatles signed: $56,250. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Meet the Beatles’ stereo LP, Beatles signed: $56,250. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

The Fab Four, inside cover of a foldover photo album, containing early glossy, Beatles signed: $125,000. Photo courtesy of Heritages.

The Fab Four, inside cover of a foldover photo album, containing early glossy, Beatles signed: $125,000. Photo courtesy of Heritages.

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box, 1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Live Auction Talk: Coca-Cola

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box,  1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box, 1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – Guess what the most popular term in the world is after “hello.”  If you said “good-bye,” you’re wrong.

It’s “Coca-Cola.”  That’s how powerful branding is.

When John Pemberton came up with the Coca-Cola formula in 1886 he had no idea the cash cow it would ultimately turn out to be. He just wanted to get rich like the next guy and in the 1880s the fastest way to do that was in a bottle – through patent medicines.

In the 19th century where doctors were few and far between cure-alls took a front seat proclaiming to fix everything from gout and rheumatism to cancer and tuberculosis. Home remedies were everywhere and inventors guarded their “secret formulas” closely.

Most of the secret formulas contained up to 50 percent alcohol and consumers didn’t seem to mind. You no doubt heard the word “snake-oil salesman”

Anyway, it’s in this arena Coca-Cola emerged. Pemberton was injured in one of the last battles of the Civil War and in constant pain. He added coca (cocaine) to his elixir and it seemed to help with his pain.

No one knew at the time how addictive cocaine was. They just knew it took away the pain.

Obviously, Coca-Cola has gone through a huge metamorphosis since then. But those are its humble beginnings.

By 1920, sales of Coca-Cola skyrocketed to more than $4 million in annual net profit. A lot of it had to do with what’s called “aspirational advertising.”

Success in life can be achieved simply by buying the right product. That was the message. And the right product, of course, was Coke. It was the great equalizer. The 6-year-old sipping Coke at the table next to you was drinking the same Coke as the Pope. No better. No worse.

Do things actually go better with Coke?

Like it or not, we’ve all been imprinted with Coke signs. Unless you’re blind. They’re everywhere and you probably grew up with them too.

Plus, I think they’re cool. The logo works for me – I really can’t say why. Maybe it’s because Coke signs have the look and feel of my “growing up” years. Pure nostalgia

Vintage tin and paper signs from products like Coke are some of the most popular collectibles today. Others include trays, calendars and pieces made between 1875 and 1925, which have the brilliant early color lithography.

Vintage items displaying beautiful women, pudgy babies and handsome horsemen abound in these pieces and are the kinds of images calling out to collectors today.

Why you see so many vintage Coke collectibles around now is because the company had a big advertising budget. The same was true of beer, tobacco, whiskey and other soft drink companies of the era.

Mark Twain said it well: “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.”

Coca-Cola pounced on the right kind of advertising.

On April 26 & 27 Morphy Auctions, Denver, Pa., featured its advertising auction. In the sale were a number of Coca-Cola items. Here are some current values:

– Tin button sign, “Coca-Cola,” right out of the box, paper just removed, 1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560.

– Serving tray, “Drink Coca-Cola,” pictures a “highbrow” woman, 1906, excellent condition, 13 inches tall: $3,300.

– Tin sign, “Drink Coca-Cola,” 1920s, very good condition, 11 inches by 8 1/4 inches: $4,500.

– Easel sign, cutout cardboard, “Drink Coca-Cola,” 1931, near mint, 23 inches by 15 inches:  $5,700.

– Sports festoon, “Coca-Cola,” 9-piece, wire and plywood, made by Kay Displays, 1930s, largest 16 inches diameter: $6,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box,  1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

 

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box, 1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Serving tray, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1906, excellent condition, 13 inches tall: $3,300. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Serving tray, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1906, excellent condition, 13 inches tall: $3,300. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Tin sign, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1920s, very good condition, 11 inches by 8 1/4 inches: $4,500. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Tin sign, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1920s, very good condition, 11 inches by 8 1/4 inches: $4,500. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Easel sign, cutout cardboard, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1931, near mint, 23 inches by 15 inches: $5,700. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Easel sign, cutout cardboard, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1931, near mint, 23 inches by 15 inches: $5,700. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Sports festoon, ‘Coca-Cola,’ nine-piece, wire and plywood, made by Kay Displays, 1930s, largest 16 inches diameter: $6,000. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Sports festoon, ‘Coca-Cola,’ nine-piece, wire and plywood, made by Kay Displays, 1930s, largest 16 inches diameter: $6,000. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Live Auction Talk: Blue Dog artist George Rodrigue

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

SANTA FE, N.M. – How many artists gain fame painting evil guard dogs?

Cajun artist George Rodrigue just might be the only one.

George got his start painting the landscapes and people of Southern Louisiana in the third grade while recovering from polio. He also grew up on local stories about the loup-garou, a French word meaning werewolf.

As a kid his mom teased him that if he didn’t behave himself today the werewolf would get him tonight. Except in her version the evil creature wasn’t quite a werewolf. It was more like a ghost dog or crazy wolf that hung out in cemeteries and sugarcane fields waiting to lunge.

Either way the image stuck.

In 1980 an investment group in Baton Rouge asked George to come up with illustrations for a book about Louisiana ghost stories to be sold at the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans.

The artist began researching local myths and legends to evoke imagery. He ended up creating one painting over a three-year period for each of the 40 stories in a book written by Chris Segura.

He completed his illustrations long before the text was actually written and he did it from themes and titles relating to well-known regional legends. Full of colossal oak trees and ghostly characters the text is known as the Bayou collection.

There was one story in the collection “Slaughter House” which stood out for people. It told of an evil dog guarding a house. George remembered the werewolf stories of his youth and painted the loup-garou.

In creating the image George remembered his terrier-spaniel Tiffany who died four years earlier. She had the perfect shape and stance he wanted and that’s where the similarities ended.

The blue-gray demon with piercing yellow eyes George painted for the book sat guarding the front of a red haunted house. He liked the color and strong image and over the next five to six years painted dozens more. His mutts were always in the bayou and always harkened back to the Cajun legend of his childhood and the loup-garou.

It’s an iconic, eerie image people say they rarely forget in his work.

“The yellow eyes are really the soul of the dog,” he said. “He has this piercing stare. People say the dog keeps talking to them with his eyes, always saying something different.”

The dog never changes position, just watches you as you watch him. George said the dog is really about life and about people searching for answers and coming up empty.

“The dog doesn’t know. You can see this longing in his eyes, this longing for love, answers,” he said.

Along with his blue-dog paintings Rodrigue continued painting Louisiana landscapes, outdoor family gatherings and genre scenes of the 19th and early 20th century. He also painted portraits including celebrity chef Paul Prudhomme, Huey Long, Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev.

George Rodrigue died Dec. 14, 2013. He was 69.

On March 15-16 New Orleans Auction Galleries featured a selection of his paintings in its spring auction. Here are some current values:

Oak on the Broussard Farm, oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1989, 8 inches by 10 inches, $13,530.

Lipstick on My Man, acrylic on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 2004, 20 inches by 16 inches, $23,370.

That’s Amore, oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360.

Yellow Rolls of Jolie Blonde, oil on canvas, signed, title and dated, 1989, 24 inches by 30 inches, $46,740.

Untitled, oil on canvas, signed, 53 inches by 84 inches, $67,650.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Oak on the Broussard Farm,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1989, 8 inches by 10 inches, $13,530. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Oak on the Broussard Farm,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1989, 8 inches by 10 inches, $13,530. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Lipstick on My Man,’ acrylic on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 2004, 20 inches by 16 inches, $23,370. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Lipstick on My Man,’ acrylic on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 2004, 20 inches by 16 inches, $23,370. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Yellow Rolls of Jolie Blonde,’ oil on canvas, signed, title and dated, 1989, 24 inches by 30 inches, $46,740. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Yellow Rolls of Jolie Blonde,’ oil on canvas, signed, title and dated, 1989, 24 inches by 30 inches, $46,740. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Untitled, oil on canvas, signed, 53 inches by 84 inches, $67,650. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Untitled, oil on canvas, signed, 53 inches by 84 inches, $67,650. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954: $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Live Auction Talk: Golf champion Bobby Jones

Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954:  $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954: $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

SANTA FE, N.M. – Golf great Bobby Jones said he never won a major championship until he learned to play golf against something instead of against somebody. That something was par. It took years and lots of heartache for Jones to learn the lesson.

It was a way of being on the golf course that allowed him to stay focused, serious and away from the gallery and his opponents. It helped quiet him.

From the first day Jones showed up on the championship stage in 1916 as the 14-year-old sensation from Dixie he wowed them. Here was a true child prodigy.

One of the few regrets Jones had about his competitive golf career was his habit of giving up huge leads only to pull it out far less easily than he thought he should have done.

Jones noted that Ben Hogan didn’t have the problem. Hogan was always good at finishing the job, he said. It was like hitting pure golf shots was an expression of who Hogan was, like an artist or composer. It was a golfing intelligence that translated into pure art and one that Jones admired.

Even so, Jones had it all: a sweet full swing, a nice feel in his fingers and perfect hand action – without ever taking a golf lesson. Here’s the paradox: Even though Jones was more talented than most amateurs, his temper tantrums on the golf course got in the way.

He rarely extended much compassion to himself.

Jones was the chief critic of Bobby Jones. He would be on the course getting more and more upset and playing less and less effectively, notorious for throwing golf clubs at helpless elms.

It’s amazing how critical genius can be of itself.

In the final of the 1919 Amateur against Davy Herron, Jones was three down with seven holes to go as he readied himself to play the 12th at Oakmont. At the same moment an official started to screech out directions to the gallery through his megaphone. Jones missed the shot and got so upset he never got back into the match. Stressed out, he lost as much as 18 pounds during any given tournament.

Even with all of his emotional turmoil Bobby Jones turned out to be the most successful amateur golfer to ever compete on the national and international circuit.

Between 1923 and 1930 Jones entered 20 major championships and won 13 of them finishing up with the Grand Slam — the United States Open, British Open, and the United States Amateur and British Amateur championships.

He made his living as an attorney and played golf part-time. He retired at age 28 and came out of retirement in 1934 to play in the Masters on an exhibition basis through 1948.

“It (championship golf) is something like a cage,” Jones said. “First you are expected to get into it and then you are expected to stay there. But of course, nobody can stay there.”

On Feb. 27, PBA Galleries, San Francisco, featured a selection of Bobby Jones Items in its Golf auction. Here are some current values:

– Book, Golf is My Game, first edition, pictorial jacket, Doubleday, 1960: $540.

– Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954: $1,020.

– Presentation album, “The Masters Tournament,” National Golf Club, 1952: $1,560.

– Program, 33rd National Open Golf Championship, Jones won defeating Al Espinosa in 36-hole playoff, Winged Foot Golf Club, 1929: $3,000.

– Silver print, Jones in full swing, earliest known surviving original photograph of Jones, matted and framed, taken Aug. 17, 1916, at age 14, 6 3/4 inches by 4 1/2 inches: $4,800.




ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954:  $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954: $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

‘Golf is My Game,’ first edition, pictorial jacket, Doubleday, 1960: $540. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

‘Golf is My Game,’ first edition, pictorial jacket, Doubleday, 1960: $540. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Presentation album, ‘The Masters Tournament,’ National Golf Club, 1952: $1,560. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Presentation album, ‘The Masters Tournament,’ National Golf Club, 1952: $1,560. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Program, ‘33rd National Open Golf Championship,’ which Jones won defeating Al Espinosa in 36-hole playoff, Winged Foot Golf Club, 1929: $3,000. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Program, ‘33rd National Open Golf Championship,’ which Jones won defeating Al Espinosa in 36-hole playoff, Winged Foot Golf Club, 1929: $3,000. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Silver print showing Jones in full swing, earliest known surviving original photograph of him, matted and framed, taken Aug. 17, 1916, at age 14, 6 3/4 inches by 4 1/2 inches: $4,800. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Silver print showing Jones in full swing, earliest known surviving original photograph of him, matted and framed, taken Aug. 17, 1916, at age 14, 6 3/4 inches by 4 1/2 inches: $4,800. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.