Early Buddhist Art in India showcased at the Met in July

Portrait of a donor, Sarnath, Uttar Pradesh, Maurya, 3rd–2nd century B.C. Sandstone, 71/2 by 4 by 6in. (19.1 by 10.2 by 15.2cm) Collection: National Museum, New Delhi
Portrait of a donor, Sarnath, Uttar Pradesh, Maurya, 3rd–2nd century B.C. Sandstone, 71/2 by 4 by 6in. (19.1 by 10.2 by 15.2cm) Collection: National Museum, New Delhi
Portrait of a donor, Sarnath, Uttar Pradesh, Maurya, 3rd–2nd century B.C. Sandstone, 71/2 by 4 by 6in. (19.1 by 10.2 by 15.2cm) Collection: National Museum, New Delhi

NEW YORK — Opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on July 21, the exhibition Tree and Serpent: Early Buddhist Art in India, 200 BCE–400 CE will illuminate how the religious landscape of ancient India was transformed by the Buddhist presence. Featuring more than 125 objects, including major loans from India, the exhibition will consist of stone sculptures associated with the adornment of the stupa — the monumental dome structures that housed the Buddha relics — as well as metalwork, ivory, ceramics, paintings and jewelry. It will present a series of evocative and interlocking themes to reveal both the pre-Buddhist origins of figurative sculpture in India and the early narrative tradition that was central to this formative moment in early Indian art. The exhibition will continue until November 13.

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Ring of reverence: a history of the halo in art

Detail of a 19th-century Continental macro-mosaic of a prominently haloed St. John Bosco, which realized $1,600 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021. Image courtesy of Akiba Antiques and LiveAuctioneers
Detail of a 19th-century Continental macro-mosaic of a prominently haloed St. John Bosco, which realized $1,600 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021. Image courtesy of Akiba Antiques and LiveAuctioneers
Detail of a 19th-century Continental macro-mosaic of a prominently haloed St. John Bosco, which realized $1,600 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021. Image courtesy of Akiba Antiques and LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK – “And God said, let there be light and then there was light,” according to the Book of Genesis in the Old Testament of the Bible. Many would insist that God didn’t create light so much as he is light. Before literacy was widespread, the ideas of light representing good and darkness symbolizing evil had to be communicated to the faithful visually, through works of art. By the Middle Ages, artists had adopted the convention of painting a halo of light around the head of a deity or a saint to mark who should be respected and revered.

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Apollo Galleries to auction Ancient, Chinese & Islamic Art from fabled collections, March 27

Roman bronze Cupid statuette, circa 100 AD, 235mm high. Similar to example in collection of Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. Provenance: property of a London gentleman. Estimate $26,225-$52,450

LONDON – Apollo Galleries and Auctions, Britain’s premier source for expertly appraised cultural art and antiquities, takes pleasure in announcing highlights of their March 27, 2022 sale. The 488-lot Ancient, Chinese and Islamic Art Auction is divided into four sections that encompass a broad range of deeply provenanced artifacts covering the Classical European era and important civilizations of the Near East, Egypt, India and China.

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