The eclectic Fritz and Lucy Jewett collection comes to Andrew Jones March 26-27

James Edward Buttersworth oil on board of two 19th-century racing yachts in the Americas Cup, estimated at $10,000-$15,000 at Andrew Jones.

LOS ANGELES — Andrew Jones’ first Design for the Home and Garden auction of the year, set for Tuesday, March 26 and Wednesday, March 27, will feature the collection of Fritz and Lucy Jewett of San Francisco — more than 550 lots of American, English, and European silver, as well as Asian works of art, English and Continental antiques, books, decorative and fine art, porcelain and glass, jewelry, and luxury items. The catalogs are now available for review and bidding at LiveAuctioneers.

“I first visited the Jewetts in 2008 and remember being bowled over by the breadth and refinement of their collection,” said Andrew Jones, the president of Andrew Jones Auctions. “It is an honor to have been selected to present the property of this amazing couple to a new generation of connoisseurs.”

Owing to their lifelong participation as sailors in the Americas Cup race, a leading lot in the sale is a circa-1886 James Edward Buttersworth (1817–1894) oil on board of two racing yachts at sea, believed to be Puritan, the successful defender in the 1885 Americas Cup contest, and Genesta, its British rival. It carries an estimate of $10,000-$15,000.

The king of candid and street photography, Henri Cartier-Bresson, makes a top-tier appearance in the sale. Rue Mouffetard, Paris was captured in 1954 as a young boy jauntily walks through the neighborhood carrying two large (for him) bottles of wine. This example is signed by the photographer with his copyright stamp, is dated 1995, and is estimated at $15,000-$20,000.

This set of 12 George IV sterling silver soup plates is credited to John Mewburn of London and dates to 1823. The plates carry a coat of arms surmounted by a coronet above the motto Excitari Non Hebescere (Be Excited, Not Faded). With provenance to Lieutenant General George de Grey, 3rd Baron Walsingham (1776-1831), London and Merton Hall, Norfolk, England, the set is estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

The Jewetts also owned a Ralph Eugene Cahoon, Jr. (1910-1982) naive work entitled Municipal Railway (Foggy Day in Frisco). Though Cahoon’s work was generally themed around his Cape Cod home and lifestyle, this oil on board focused on a San Francisco icon, the cable car. It is estimated at $15,000-$25,000.

From a private Chicago collection comes a fine Italian micromosaic table top. Believed to be from the workshop of Cesare Roccheggiani in Rome, the late 19th-century work centrally depicts St. Peter’s Square, with smaller scenes of Roman landmarks including the Pantheon, the Arch of Titus, the Campidoglio, the Forum, the Colosseum, the Temple of Hercules Victor, Castel Sant’Angelo, and the Tomb of Cecilia Metalla. The 22.25in-diameter top is estimated at $20,000-$30,000.

American, English, and Continental Silver sets the table at Jasper52 Feb. 27

Christofle six-piece sterling silver tea set, dating to the 1890s and estimated at $23,000-$28,000 at Jasper52.

NEW YORK – On Tuesday, February 27, starting at 8 pm Eastern time, Jasper52 will present its next sale of American, English, and Continental Silver, featuring precisely 155 lots of masterful treasures from across the ages. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Leading the highlights is a handsome pair of early 20th-century German silver candelabra, estimated at $12,000-$14,000. Both stand slightly taller than 16in, and both are stamped ‘835’, indicating the purity of the silver on a scale that tops out at 1,000.

More spectacular still is a Christofle six-piece sterling silver tea set, dating to the 1890s and estimated at $23,000-$28,000. The set consists of a samovar (water heater) with stand, a hot chocolate server, a teapot, a water server, and a sugar bowl and a creamer pot, both with vermeil interiors, and also a tray.

Completing the highlights is an exquisite example of Judaica: a pair of early 20th-century silver rimonim, or torah finials, by Simon Zimmerman. Described as ‘rare’, each stands 14in tall and are together estimated at $4,000-$5,000.

English silver mustard pots add spice to your table

A large George III silver mustard pot with a figural Chinaman final, the work of Rebecca Emes & Edward Barnard of London, achieved $3,000 plus the buyer’s premium against an estimate of $300-$500 in September 2023. Image courtesy of Cottone Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK – Mustard has been used as a medicine and a spice for millennia. A yellow mustard paste was used to whet the appetite in the courts of Zhou dynasty China and to flavor hot and cold meats by the Romans. The use of mustard as a condiment and a pick-me-up in England is attested by medieval ‘herbals’ describing the preparation of mustard balls – golf-ball-sized spheres of coarsely-ground mustard seed, bound with flour and cinnamon, which could be stored and then mixed with wine, milk or vinegar when required for the table. Production in France was centered in Dijon and in England at Tewksbury. As early as the 1600s, mustard was a figure of speech for something extremely powerful, passionate, or enthusiastic. Shakespeare’s Falstaff said of Pions “that his wit is as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard”.

Exactly what sort of silver vessels were used to serve wet mustard at the Tudor table in the best English houses is uncertain. None have survived. Instead, the earliest surviving form of English mustard pot is the blind caster used to dispense a dry mustard powder that became fashionable in the early 18th century. A Mrs. Clements of Saddler Street in Durham is considered the first person to sell English mustard as a finely ground powder.

This early George III drum-shaped mustard pot made by John Jacob in London in 1760 has an aperture for the spoon cut out of the top rim rather than the edge of the lid. It earned £1,200 (about $1,520) plus the buyer’s premium in October 2021. Image courtesy of Chiswick Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.
This early George III drum-shaped mustard pot made by John Jacob in London in 1760 has an aperture for the spoon cut out of the top rim rather than the edge of the lid. It earned £1,200 (about $1,520) plus the buyer’s premium in October 2021. Image courtesy of Chiswick Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

Only rarely do these Queen Anne or George I period casters appear for sale. Far more common are the classic Georgian ‘drum’-form mustard pots – known at the time as mustard tankards or cans – that first emerged in the second half of the 18th century as the fashion changed from dry to wet mustard. This is where most collectors begin their quests.

An 1831 William IV provincial silver drum-form mustard pot by Barber, Cattle & North of York, England brought £1,400 ($1,775) plus the buyer’s premium in June 2021. Image courtesy of Chiswick Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.
An 1831 William IV provincial silver drum-form mustard pot by Barber, Cattle & North of York, England brought £1,400 ($1,775) plus the buyer’s premium in June 2021. Image courtesy of Chiswick Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

There are numerous survivors and, as two models are seldom exactly alike, most collectors seek to own multiple examples. Some of the earliest of the drum-form pots from the 1760s and early 1770s have an aperture for the spoon cut out of the top rim rather than the edge of the lid, which later became common. Most show the influence of the neoclassical Adam style, while the introduction of glass liners, which made cleaning much easier, allowed for open-work containers contrasting fretwork with colored or clear glass.

A George III silver mustard pot with associated silver spoon, dating to 1797 by Charles Chesterman II of London, sold for £120 ($152) plus the buyer’s premium in May 2023. Image courtesy of Elstob Auctioneers and LiveAuctioneers.
A George III silver mustard pot with associated silver spoon, dating to 1797 by Charles Chesterman II of London, sold for £120 ($152) plus the buyer’s premium in May 2023. Image courtesy of Elstob Auctioneers and LiveAuctioneers.

By the Victorian era, multiple styles of mustard pot existed side-by-side – the gothic, the neoclassical, the naturalistic and the whimsical. Most popular of all were the novelties. From the 1850s, mustard pots and cruets appeared in a wide range of cast and chased forms designed to amuse, from animals (monkeys, owls, cats and pigs were particularly cherished), literary characters (the distinctively British figure of Mr. Punch was a favorite, made in several different guises) to miniature models of drums, fruit or hats. Some of these designs carry registration marks, indicating they were guarded at the time as intellectual property.

Victorian novelty silver mustard pot modeled as a monkey in oriental dress, the work of Edward Charles Brown of London in 1867, sold for $6,000 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2020. Image courtesy of Alderfer Auction and LiveAuctioneers.
This Victorian novelty silver mustard pot modeled as a monkey in oriental dress, the work of Edward Charles Brown of London in 1867, brought $6,000 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2020. Image courtesy of Alderfer Auction and LiveAuctioneers.

As a silver-collecting category, mustard pots are perfect. There are numerous varieties from across two and a half centuries, and they are small and easily displayed. Unlike some other Georgian domestic silver forms, they remain functional, and most are relatively affordable.

Pricing follows the general rules of English silver-collecting. Most Georgian and Victorian mustards can be bought for between $100-$500, but there is a premium placed on certain makers – the woman silversmith Hester Bateman or the ‘royal’ goldsmith Paul Storr, for example – and collectors can expect to pay more for pieces by Arts and Crafts designers such as Charles Robert Ashbee or Omar Ramsden.

An unmarked circa-1910 Arts and Crafts chased and pierced silver and ivory mustard pot attributed to Charles Robert Ashbee realized £2,200 ($2,790) plus the buyer’s premium in October 2023. Image courtesy of Dreweatts Donnington Priory and LiveAuctioneers.
An unmarked circa-1910 Arts and Crafts chased and pierced silver and ivory mustard pot attributed to Charles Robert Ashbee realized £2,200 ($2,790) plus the buyer’s premium in October 2023. Image courtesy of Dreweatts Donnington Priory and LiveAuctioneers.

Some relatively simple vessels bearing regional assay marks also have crossover collecting appeal. Most mustard pots were hallmarked in the English cities of London, Sheffield and Birmingham, or in Edinburgh, Scotland, but those struck with provincial English or Scottish marks are much harder to find. For collectors of York silver, a mustard pot with that rare town mark might be worth $2,000 to $4,000.

This 1848 Victorian silver novelty mustard pot modeled as a standing owl by Charles Thomas Fox & George Fox of London flew away with £1,900 ($2,410) plus the buyer’s premium in August 2020. Image courtesy of Elstob Auctioneers and LiveAuctioneers.
This 1848 Victorian silver novelty mustard pot modeled as a standing owl by Charles Thomas Fox & George Fox of London flew away with £1,900 ($2,410) plus the buyer’s premium in August 2020. Image courtesy of Elstob Auctioneers and LiveAuctioneers.

Novelties are also placed at the collecting top table. Victorian and Edwardian models such as the seated Mr. Punch, or the owl with a mouse doubling up as a spoon, are some of the hobby’s most desirable pieces. Expect to pay between $1,000 and $5,000 for period examples.

A 1961 novelty silver gilt penguin form mustard pot with a fish-handled spoon by William Comyns of London caught $2,100 plus the buyer’s premium in December 2020. Image courtesy of Merrill's Auctioneers and Appraisers and LiveAuctioneers.
A 1961 novelty silver gilt penguin-form mustard pot with a fish-handled spoon by William Comyns of London caught $2,100 plus the buyer’s premium in December 2020. Image courtesy of Merrill’s Auctioneers and Appraisers and LiveAuctioneers.

Some of the most popular novelty silver mustard pot designs were reproduced in the post-war era, but even these – notably the frog and the penguin by William Comyns – can bring surprising sums. The top price for a silver mustard pot on the LiveAuctioneers database was recorded at Alderfer Auction in Hatfield, Pennsylvania in June 2020 for a cast and chased vessel dating to 1867, modeled as a monkey in oriental dress. One of the best-known designs by the London silversmith Edward Charles Brown, it was estimated at $1,000-$2,000 but sold at $6,000 with buyer’s premium. That one really did cut the mustard.

American, English and Continental Silver shines in April 11 auction

William and Mary silver tazza made in London in 1692 by William Gamble (shown from the top), estimated at $19,000-$23,000
William and Mary silver tazza made in London in 1692 by William Gamble (shown from the top), estimated at $19,000-$23,000

NEW YORK – On Tuesday, April 11, starting at 8 pm Eastern time, Jasper52 will hold a sale of American, English and Continental silver. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Orville Bulman fantasy artwork highlights Sarasota Estate Auction, Mar. 4-5

Untitled Karl Gerstner work in wood and aluminum, estimated at $4,000-$8,000
Untitled Karl Gerstner work in wood and aluminum, estimated at $4,000-$8,000

SARASOTA, Fla. — Sarasota Estate Auction has planned a two-day sale for Saturday, March 4, and Sunday, March 5. The first day is entirely devoted to a single-owner lifetime collection of sterling silver, and the second day features artworks by Karl Gerstner and Orville Bulman. A total of 1,400 lots will be presented in all. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Choice and stylish selections in Sept. 6 all-silver auction

Hans Hansen Art Deco sterling silver sauce jug, est. $2,000-$2,500
Hans Hansen Art Deco sterling silver sauce jug, est. $2,000-$2,500
Hans Hansen Art Deco sterling silver sauce jug, est. $2,000-$2,500

NEW YORK – A Hans Hansen Art Deco sterling silver sauce jug, a pair of George I silver candlesticks made in London in 1714, and a 19th-century silver vase from Germany will vie for top lot status at Jasper52’s American, English and Continental Silver auction, which will be conducted on Tuesday, September 6 at 8 pm Eastern time. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Chinese porcelain bowl rockets to $200K at Briggs

Chinese porcelain dragon bowl with Yongzheng mark, $200,000
 Chinese porcelain dragon bowl with Yongzheng mark, $200,000

Chinese porcelain dragon bowl with Yongzheng mark, $200,000

GARNET VALLEY, Pa. – Briggs Auction’s Fine Estates Auction held on July 30 featured a fine selection of antique and modern furnishings, fine art, fine porcelains, decorative arts and more. “This was a well-received auction with a wide variety of items that appealed to a broad range of bidders,” said Stephen Turner, the president of Briggs Auction, Inc. “Strong prices were a good indication the industry is thriving.”

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