Jewish Museum focuses on crucial period in New York: 1962-1964

Marjorie Strider, ‘Girl with Radish,’ 1963. Acrylic on laminated pine on Masonite panels, 72 by 60in. Collection of Ruth and Theodore Baum, New York / Palm Beach, Fla.
Marjorie Strider, ‘Girl with Radish,’ 1963. Acrylic on laminated pine on Masonite panels, 72 by 60in. Collection of Ruth and Theodore Baum, New York / Palm Beach, Fla.
Marjorie Strider, ‘Girl with Radish,’ 1963. Acrylic on laminated pine on Masonite panels, 72 by 60in. Collection of Ruth and Theodore Baum, New York / Palm Beach, Fla.

NEW YORK — The Jewish Museum presents New York: 1962-1964, an exhibition that explores a pivotal three-year period in the history of art and culture in New York City, examining how artists living and working in New York responded to their rapidly changing world. Installed across two floors, this immersive exhibition presents more than 150 works of art — all made or seen in New York between 1962-1964 — including painting, sculpture, photography and film, alongside fashion, design, dance, poetry and ephemera. The exhibition is on view at the Jewish Museum through January 8, 2023.

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Color Field painting: European roots, New World flavor

Kenneth Noland frequently played with circular motifs, as in this untitled work from 1963 that brought $120,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2018 at Wright. Image courtesy of Wright and LiveAuctioneers
Kenneth Noland frequently played with circular motifs, as in this untitled work from 1963 that brought $120,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2018 at Wright. Image courtesy of Wright and LiveAuctioneers
Kenneth Noland frequently played with circular motifs, as in this untitled work from 1963 that brought $120,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2018 at Wright. Image courtesy of Wright and LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK — Among the most distinctive styles of abstract painting to emerge from New York in the 1940s-1960s was the one dubbed “Color Field.” Its look is definitely rooted in the European modernists but it’s overwhelmingly New World flavored. Wide swaths of color fields — some have firmly defined and geometric borders while others are more amorphous — define the canvas. Brushstrokes are far less important than the overall process, and the mastery of color seeks to engage the viewer in a visceral manner. A handful of artists led the charge and their work continues to attract collectors while influencing the art world and up-and-coming artists. Among those who have been labeled Color Field painters are Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Sam Gilliam, Clyfford Still, Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland.

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