Tag Archive for: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Richard Avedon (American, 1923–2004). Outtake from ‘Andy Warhol and members of the Factory,’ October 9, 1969. Gelatin silver print, 8 by 10in. (20.3 by 25.4cm). The Richard Avedon Foundation © The Richard Avedon Foundation

Met show of Richard Avedon group portraits opens Jan. 19

Richard Avedon (American, 1923–2004). Outtake from ‘Andy Warhol and members of the Factory,’ October 9, 1969. Gelatin silver print, 8 by 10in. (20.3 by 25.4cm). The Richard Avedon Foundation © The Richard Avedon Foundation

Richard Avedon (American, 1923–2004). Outtake from ‘Andy Warhol and members of the Factory,’ October 9, 1969. Gelatin silver print, 8 by 10in. (20.3 by 25.4cm). The Richard Avedon Foundation © The Richard Avedon Foundation

NEW YORK – To celebrate the centennial of Richard Avedon’s birth in 1923, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will present a selection of the photographer’s most innovative group portraits in the exhibition Richard Avedon: MURALS, opening Thursday, January 19 and continuing through October 1. Although Avedon first earned his reputation as a fashion photographer in the late 1940s, his greatest achievement was his stunning reinvention of the photographic portrait. Focused on the short period between 1969 and 1971, this exhibition will explore a critical juncture in the artist’s career, when, after a hiatus from portraiture, he began working with a new camera and a new sense of scale. The exhibition will be organized around three monumental photomurals in the Met collection (the largest measures nearly 10 by 35ft) that depict the era’s preeminent artists, activists, and politicians. Uniting the murals with session outtakes and contemporaneous projects, the exhibition will track Avedon’s evolving approach to group portraiture, through which he transformed the conventions of the genre.

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Philip Guston (American (born Canada), 1913–1980), ‘The Line,’ 1978. Oil on canvas, 71 by 73 1⁄4in (180.3 by 186.1cm). Photograph by Genevieve Hanson © The estate of Philip Guston. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, promised gift of Musa Guston Mayer

Met announces gift of 220 Philip Guston works from artist’s daughter

Philip Guston (American (born Canada), 1913–1980), ‘The Line,’ 1978. Oil on canvas, 71 by 73 1⁄4in (180.3 by 186.1cm). Photograph by Genevieve Hanson © The estate of Philip Guston. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, promised gift of Musa Guston Mayer

Philip Guston (American (born Canada), 1913–1980), ‘The Line,’ 1978. Oil on canvas, 71 by 73 1⁄4in (180.3 by 186.1cm). Photograph by Genevieve Hanson © The estate of Philip Guston. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, promised gift of Musa Guston Mayer

NEW YORK — On December 14, the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced a transformative promised gift of 220 works by Philip Guston (1913–1980) from the personal collection of Musa Mayer, the artist’s daughter. Consisting of 96 paintings and 124 drawings — the earliest created in 1930 and the latest made in 1980 — the collection represents the full arc of Guston’s career. Ultimately, the gift will position the Met as the largest repository of works by the iconic American painter.

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Bleriot Model XI Monoplane weathervane, circa 1909-13, copper with traces of original gilding; airplane: 57 ¼ by 55 by 10in. (145.4 by 139.7 by 25.4cm), directionals: 38 5/8 by 38 ½ by 15 ¾in. (98.1 by 97.8 by 40cm), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of Michael and Patricia Del Castello. Photo credit: Michael Kent Lynberg.

Met receives gift of American aviation-themed weathervane

Bleriot Model XI Monoplane weathervane, circa 1909-13, copper with traces of original gilding; airplane: 57 ¼ by 55 by 10in. (145.4 by 139.7 by 25.4cm), directionals: 38 5/8 by 38 ½ by 15 ¾in. (98.1 by 97.8 by 40cm), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of Michael and Patricia Del Castello. Photo credit: Michael Kent Lynberg.

Bleriot Model XI Monoplane weathervane, circa 1909-13, copper with traces of original gilding; airplane: 57 ¼ by 55 by 10in. (145.4 by 139.7 by 25.4cm), directionals: 38 5/8 by 38 ½ by 15 ¾in. (98.1 by 97.8 by 40cm), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of Michael and Patricia Del Castello. Photo credit: Michael Kent Lynberg.

NEW YORK — The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced on September 23 that it has received a gift of a rare American weathervane from Michael and Patricia Del Castello. Produced by an unidentified maker between 1909 and 1913, it was likely commissioned for the Poland Spring House in Poland Spring, Maine, where it was installed on its rooftop by 1914 and remained on view until 1973. The commanding and distinctive weathervane joins the Met’s growing collection of American vernacular sculpture and will be on view in Gallery 732 in the American Wing starting September 29.

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Frederic Leighton (1830-1896), ‘Flaming June,’ circa 1895 oil on canvas, 46 7/8 by 46 7/8in. (119 by 119cm.) Museo de Arte de Ponce. The Luis A. Ferre Foundation, Inc.

Met hosts Victorian masterworks from Puerto Rico museum

 

Frederic Leighton (1830-1896), ‘Flaming June,’ circa 1895 oil on canvas, 46 7/8 by 46 7/8in. (119 by 119cm.) Museo de Arte de Ponce. The Luis A. Ferre Foundation, Inc.

Frederic Leighton (1830-1896), ‘Flaming June,’ circa 1895 oil on canvas, 46 7/8 by 46 7/8in. (119 by 119cm.) Museo de Arte de Ponce. The Luis A. Ferre Foundation, Inc.

NEW YORK and PONCE, Puerto Rico – The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, will display five of the most important paintings from the collection of the Museo de Arte de Ponce, Puerto Rico, from October 8 through February 2024. The loans include Frederic Leighton’s Flaming June (1895), an icon of Victorian painting; John Everett Millais’s The Escape of a Heretic, 1559 (1857); and the three scenes comprising the Small Briar Rose series by Sir Edward Burne-Jones (all painted 1871–73). Following a technical examination of Flaming June conducted by conservators, scientists and imaging specialists at the Met, the five works will be displayed in the museum’s galleries for 19th- and early-20th century European paintings and sculpture.

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The facade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, photographed in September 2019. A state law passed in August requires museums to post signs that identify works looted by Nazis between 1933 and 1945. The Met has identified 53 such works in its collection. All were acquired after they were returned to their owners or heirs, but Met officials announced an intention to label them regardless. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Hugo Schneider. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 2.0 Generic license.

New York museums to disclose artwork looted by Nazis

The facade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, photographed in September 2019. A state law passed in August requires museums to post signs that identify works looted by Nazis between 1933 and 1945. The Met has identified 53 such works in its collection. All were acquired after they were returned to their owners or heirs, but Met officials announced an intention to label them regardless. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Hugo Schneider. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 2.0 Generic license.

The facade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, photographed in September 2019. A state law passed in August requires museums to post signs that identify works looted by Nazis between 1933 and 1945. The Met has identified 53 such works in its collection. All were acquired after they were returned to their owners or heirs, but Met officials announced an intention to label them regardless. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Hugo Schneider. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 2.0 Generic license.

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) – Museums in New York that exhibit artworks looted by Nazis during the Holocaust are now required by law to let the public know about those dark chapters in their provenance through placards displayed with the stolen objects.

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Hans Holbein the Younger (German, Augsburg 1497-98–1543 London), ‘Henry VIII,’ circa 1537. Oil on wood, 11 by 7 7/8in. (28 by 20cm). Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. Image © Museo Nacional Thyssen- Bornemisza, Madrid

Splendors of Tudor-era England come to the Met in October

 

Hans Holbein the Younger (German, Augsburg 1497-98–1543 London), ‘Henry VIII,’ circa 1537. Oil on wood, 11 by 7 7/8in. (28 by 20cm). Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. Image © Museo Nacional Thyssen- Bornemisza, Madrid

Hans Holbein the Younger (German, Augsburg 1497-98–1543 London), ‘Henry VIII,’circa 1537.Oil on wood, 11 by 7 7/8in.(28 by 20cm).Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid.Image ©Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

NEW YORK – From King Henry VII’s seizure of the throne in 1485 to the death of his granddaughter Queen Elizabeth I in 1603, England’s Tudor monarchs used art to legitimize and glorify their tumultuous reigns. On view at the Met from October 10 to January 8, 2023, The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England will trace the transformation of the arts under their rule through more than 100 objects — including iconic portraits, spectacular tapestries, manuscripts, sculpture and armor — from both the museum collection and international lenders.

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Max Hollein will be the Met’s next CEO, effective July 2023

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s board of trustees has selected its current museum director, Max Hollein, to succeed Daniel H. Weiss as CEO in July 2023. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, photo credit Eileen Travell

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s board of trustees has selected its current museum director, Max Hollein, to succeed Daniel H. Weiss as CEO in July 2023. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, photo credit Eileen Travell

NEW YORK — The board of trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art has voted that Max Hollein, who is presently serving as Marina Kellen French director of the museum, will add to his title Chief Executive Officer effective July 1, 2023, when current Met President and CEO Daniel H. Weiss steps down as previously announced. At that time, the director and CEO will be responsible for the overall leadership of the museum.

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Dan Weiss, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, photographed in January 2018. On June 28, he announced he would step down from his roles in June 2023. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Valdel10. Shared under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Met President and CEO Daniel Weiss to step down in June 2023

Dan Weiss, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, photographed in January 2018. On June 28, he announced he would step down from his roles in June 2023. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Valdel10. Shared under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Daniel Weiss, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, photographed in January 2018. On June 28, 2022 he announced he will step down from his roles in June 2023. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Valdel10. Shared under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

NEW YORK — Daniel H. Weiss, president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art since 2015 and its president and CEO since 2017, announced June 28 that he intends to step down in June 2023. An accomplished scholar and author who holds a PhD in art history and an MBA, Weiss was recruited to lead the Met in 2015 after tenures as a college president, university dean and a professor of art history. He led the museum through a series of historic challenges — financial, infrastructure and societal — from which the museum has emerged as a stronger institution with its place intact among the most ambitious, programmatically robust and financially strong cultural institutions in the world.

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Ball gown, Marguery Bolhagen (American, 1920–2021), circa 1961; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, Jr., 1966 (2009.300.2556a, b). The Richard and Gloria Manney John Henry Belter Rococo Revival Parlor, circa 1850, Gift of Sirio D. Molteni and Rita M. Pooler, 1965 (Inst.65.4). Photograph © Dario Calmese, 2021.

Eight film directors contribute to Costume Institute’s Spring 2022 show

Ball gown, Marguery Bolhagen (American, 1920–2021), ca. 1961; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, Jr., 1966 (2009.300.2556a, b). The Richard and Gloria Manney John Henry Belter Rococo Revival Parlor, ca. 1850, Gift of Sirio D. Molteni and Rita M. Pooler, 1965 (Inst.65.4). Photo © Dario Calmese, 2021.

Ball gown, Marguery Bolhagen (American, 1920–2021), circa 1961; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, Jr., 1966 (2009.300.2556a, b). The Richard and Gloria Manney John Henry Belter Rococo Revival Parlor, circa 1850, Gift of Sirio D. Molteni and Rita M. Pooler, 1965 (Inst.65.4). Photograph © Dario Calmese, 2021.

NEW YORK – The Costume Institute’s 2022 spring exhibition, In America: An Anthology of Fashion — the second of a two-part presentation — will explore the foundations of American fashion through a series of sartorial displays featuring individual designers and dressmakers who worked in the United States from the 19th to the mid-late 20th century. In America: An Anthology of Fashion will open on May 7 and close on September 5. In celebration of its debut, The Costume Institute Benefit (also known as The Met Gala™) will coincide with the opening date of the show. The benefit provides The Costume Institute with its primary source of annual funding for exhibitions, publications, acquisitions, operations and capital improvements.

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Attributed to Gian Marco Cavalli (Italian, ca. 1454–after 1508, activity documented 1475–1508). ‘Mars, Venus and Cupid with Vulcan at his Forge (The Mantuan Roundel),’ ca. 1500. Parcel-gilt bronze with silver inlay. Integrally cast gilt frame with suspension loop. Diameter: 16 9/16in (42cm); Depth: 11/16in (1.7cm); Height with suspension loop: 18 3/8in (46.7cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, The Isaacson-Draper Fund, Florence and Herbert Irving Acquisitions Fund, 2021 Benefit Fund, Louis V. Bell, Harris Brisbane Dick, Fletcher, and Rogers Funds and Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, Alejandro Santo Domingo, Michel David-Weill, David T. Schiff, Annette de la Renta, Mark Fisch, the Hon. Kimba Wood and Frank Richardson, Denise and Andrew Saul, Beatrice Stern, Wrightsman Fellows, and members of the Acquisitions Committee Gifts, 2022 (2022.6)

Met acquires important Cavalli Renaissance bronze relief

Attributed to Gian Marco Cavalli (Italian, ca. 1454–after 1508, activity documented 1475–1508). ‘Mars, Venus and Cupid with Vulcan at his Forge (The Mantuan Roundel),’ ca. 1500. Parcel-gilt bronze with silver inlay. Integrally cast gilt frame with suspension loop. Diameter: 16 9/16in (42cm); Depth: 11/16in (1.7cm); Height with suspension loop: 18 3/8in (46.7cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, The Isaacson-Draper Fund, Florence and Herbert Irving Acquisitions Fund, 2021 Benefit Fund, Louis V. Bell, Harris Brisbane Dick, Fletcher, and Rogers Funds and Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, Alejandro Santo Domingo, Michel David-Weill, David T. Schiff, Annette de la Renta, Mark Fisch, the Hon. Kimba Wood and Frank Richardson, Denise and Andrew Saul, Beatrice Stern, Wrightsman Fellows, and members of the Acquisitions Committee Gifts, 2022 (2022.6)

Attributed to Gian Marco Cavalli (Italian, circa 1454–after 1508, activity documented 1475–1508), ‘Mars, Venus and Cupid with Vulcan at his Forge (The Mantuan Roundel),’ circa 1500. Parcel-gilt bronze with silver inlay. Integrally cast gilt frame with suspension loop. Diameter: 16 9/16in (42cm); Depth: 11/16in (1.7cm); Height with suspension loop: 18 3/8in (46.7cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, The Isaacson-Draper Fund, Florence and Herbert Irving Acquisitions Fund, 2021 Benefit Fund, Louis V. Bell, Harris Brisbane Dick, Fletcher, and Rogers Funds and Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, Alejandro Santo Domingo, Michel David-Weill, David T. Schiff, Annette de la Renta, Mark Fisch, the Hon. Kimba Wood and Frank Richardson, Denise and Andrew Saul, Beatrice Stern, Wrightsman Fellows, and members of the Acquisitions Committee Gifts, 2022 (2022.6)

NEW YORK — The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced it has acquired an extremely rare bronze relief attributed to Gian Marco Cavalli, an Italian goldsmith, sculptor, print engraver and medalist who worked for the Gonzaga court in Mantua. Created around 1500, it is both the largest and one of the most technically sophisticated examples of a bronze roundel known from the early Renaissance. Lavishly embellished with gilding and silver inlay, the beautifully rendered configuration shows four figures from Roman mythology and provides new insights into the experimentation and impeccable craftsmanship that are the hallmarks of early north Italian bronzes.

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