James Bond film vehicles on view at Petersen Museum

1964 Aston Martin DB5 that has appeared in the James Bond films ‘Goldeneye’ (1995), ‘Tomorrow Never Dies’ (1997), ‘Skyfall’ (2012), ‘Spectre’ (2015) and the upcoming ‘No Time to Die’ (2021). Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

1964 Aston Martin DB5 that has appeared on screen in no less than five James Bond films: ‘Goldeneye’ (1995), ‘Tomorrow Never Dies’ (1997), ‘Skyfall’ (2012), ‘Spectre’ (2015) and the upcoming ‘No Time to Die’ (2021). Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

LOS ANGELES – Bond in Motion, the largest official exhibit in the United States to feature vehicles that appeared on screen in James Bond movies, has opened at the Petersen Automotive Museum and will continue through October 30.

Produced in collaboration with EON Productions and The Ian Fleming® Foundation, Bond in Motion is also the first official exhibition in the United States to feature original vehicles from the James Bond film franchise. The exhibit celebrates the 60th anniversary of the 007 films.

1977 Lotus Esprit S1 Submarine, aka ‘Wet Nellie,’ from the 1977 James Bond film ‘The Spy Who Loved Me.’ Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

1977 Lotus Esprit S1 Submarine, aka ‘Wet Nellie,’ from the 1977 James Bond film ‘The Spy Who Loved Me.’ Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

With the publication of his first spy novel, Casino Royale (1953), author and former naval intelligence officer Ian Fleming introduced the world to the enchanting exploits of James Bond, a British officer in the Secret Intelligence Service, also known as MI6. In all, Fleming would produce 12 novels and two short stories, laying the foundation for what would become a global literary and cinematic legacy.

Aston Martin DBS featured in the 2008 James Bond film ‘Quantum of Solace.’ Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

Aston Martin DBS featured in the 2008 James Bond film ‘Quantum of Solace.’ Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

Beginning in 1962, with the movie adaptation of Fleming’s sixth title, Dr. No, the exciting and dangerous world of James Bond was translated to screen, setting the tone for Bond films to come. Much like the novels on which they are based, Bond films combine the adventure of exotic locations and scheming villains with the action of death-defying stunts and heart-pounding chases in nearly every type of vehicle imaginable. Often modified by quartermaster “Q,” these vehicles, much like Bond himself, conceal their true nature until their weapons and gadgetry become important plot devices.

1999 Heron XC-70 ParachuteParahawk from 1999’s ‘The World is Not Enough.’ Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

1999 Heron XC-70 ParachuteParahawk from 1999’s ‘The World is Not Enough.’ Photo courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum and Ted7

The Bond in Motion exhibit offers visitors a rare up-close experience of the most iconic vehicles associated with the world’s most famous secret agent, 007.

Visit the website for the Petersen Automotive Museum and see its dedicated page for Bond in Motion.

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