‘The Oath of a Freeman,’ made by the infamous forger Mark Hofmann, will be offered for sale with the slipcover the Library of Congress created for the document while it was considering whether to acquire it. Hofmann confessed to the forgery in 1987.

Infamous Mark Hofmann forgery comes to auction in June

‘The Oath of a Freeman,’ made by the infamous forger Mark Hofmann, will be offered for sale with the slipcover the Library of Congress created for the document while it was considering whether to acquire it. Hofmann confessed to the forgery in 1987.

‘The Oath of a Freeman,’ made by the infamous forger Mark Hofmann, will be offered for sale with the slipcover the Library of Congress created for the document while it was considering whether to acquire it.

DALLAS – One of the most infamous forgeries in United States history heads to auction for the first time in June. The Oath of a Freeman, a pledge of loyalty and duty demanded of all new members of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, is said to be the oldest printed document in English North America, produced in Cambridge, Mass., around 1638 or 1639. But the only known copy of this diminutive broadsheet was made in 1985 by a master forger and convicted murderer who has spent the last 34 years in a Utah prison.

That man is Mark Hofmann, subject of the 2021 Netflix true-crime mini-series Murder Among the Mormons.

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This extensively carved Chinese lapis scholar’s rock on a rosewood stand brought $20,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020 at Bridgewater Auction.

Chinese scholar’s rocks: artworks created by nature

This extensively carved Chinese lapis scholar’s rock on a rosewood stand brought $20,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020 at Bridgewater Auction.

This extensively carved Chinese lapis scholar’s rock on a rosewood stand brought $20,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020 at Bridgewater Auction.

NEW YORK — Few artists can aspire to be as talented as nature. Over centuries, its forces have shaped rocks into elegant objects that have inspired Chinese painters and poets. The objects called gongshi (Chinese, 供石), better known as scholar’s rocks, began to be appreciated for their striking forms in the late Tang Dynasty (600-900) and gathered from riverbeds, on mountains, and in far flung locations. By the Song dynasty (960-1279), their place in history was cemented when Chinese scholars brought them into the studios where they wrote and painted. Scholars would draw inspiration from these rocks that represented nature — mountains in particular — gazing upon them in meditative contemplation. Many poems and essays were based on these rocks, and they have been subject matter for paintings.

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In show of Pharaonic heritage, Egypt parades royal mummies

Colossal statue of Ramesses (or Ramses) II at Memphis, Egypt, shown for illustrative purposes only; not part of the April 3, 2021 transport. Photo taken in September 1999 by Barrylb.

CAIRO (AP) – Egypt held a gala parade on Saturday celebrating the transport of 22 of its prized royal mummies from central Cairo to their new resting place in a massive new museum further south in the capital.

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Psalms section of a Dead Sea scroll.

Israeli experts announce discovery of more Dead Sea scrolls

Psalms section of the Dead Sea Scroll. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or fewer. Courtesy Wikipedia

Psalms section of a Dead Sea scroll. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer. Courtesy Wikipedia

JERUSALEM — Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday announced the discovery of dozens of Dead Sea scroll fragments found in a desert cave and believed hidden during a Jewish revolt against Rome nearly 1,900 years ago. Read more

Lawrence Wang, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

After outcry, Israeli museum calls off sale of Islamic art

Lawrence Wang, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Sheikh Faisal Bin Qassim Al Thani Museum. Image by Lawrence Wang, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel’s premier museum for Islamic art has scrapped the planned auction of scores of rare and precious items after public outcry over the attempted sale, which had been expected to fetch millions of dollars from wealthy private collectors. Read more

18th C. school for Black children to be moved to Colonial Williamsburg

The Bray-Digges House in Williamsburg, Va. Image courtesy of Colonial Williamsburg

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. – A small, white building tucked away on the William & Mary campus once housed the Williamsburg Bray School, an 18th-century institution dedicated to the education of enslaved and free Black children, researchers have determined. Now, the university and Colonial Williamsburg are working together to ensure current and future generations learn about the complex history of what is likely the oldest extant building in the United States dedicated to the education of Black children – and the stories of those who were part of it.

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Pompeii’s museum reborn to display amazing finds

A gallery at the the Antiquarium museum displays artifacts excavated at the Pompeii site. Image courtesy of the Antiquarium

POMPEII, Italy (AP) – Decades after suffering bombing and earthquake damage, Pompeii’s museum has been reborn, showing off exquisite finds from excavations of the ancient Roman city.

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Egypt unveils ancient funerary temple amid pyramids

Archaeologists have unearthed the temple of Queen Neit near the Saqqara necropolis, which is part of Egypt’s ancient capital of Memphis that includes the famed Giza pyramids. Pictured is the Saqqara pyramid of Djoser. Image by Charles James Sharp. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

CAIRO (AP) – Egypt’s former antiquities minister and noted archaeologist Zahi Hawass on Sunday revealed details of an ancient funerary temple in a vast necropolis south of Cairo.

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Florida’s Seminole Tribe reclaims ancestors, artifacts

George Catlin (American, 1796-1872), portrait of ‘Co-ee-há-jo, a Seminole Chief,’ 1837. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Public domain image shown for illustrative purposes only. Painting is not related to the Seminole Tribe’s repatriated artifacts.

CLEWISTON, Fla. (AP) – For decades, Florida’s Seminole Tribe has been fighting to reclaim their ancestors who were stolen from burial sites across the state during the height of colonialism in North America.

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Saqqara Pyramid of Djoser in Egypt. Feb. 16, 2007 photo by Charlesjsharp, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Egypt reveals 59 ancient coffins found near Saqqara pyramids

Step pyramid of Djoser in Saqqara, Egypt. Photo by Charles J. Sharp, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

CAIRO (AP) – Egypt’s tourism and antiquities minster said on Saturday archaeologists have unearthed dozens of ancient coffins in a vast necropolis south of Cairo.

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