Edvard Munch’s ‘Vampire’ to be auctioned Nov. 3 in NYC

NEW YORK (AP) – Edvard Munch’s Vampire, a dark, brooding painting of a woman with cascading red hair kissing a man’s neck, may set a new record for the Norwegian artist when it goes on the auction block this fall.

The 1894 work, which has been in private hands for more than 70 years, is expected to bring $35 million at Sotheby’s on Nov. 3. In May, Munch’s Girls on the Bridge sold for $30.8 million, setting a record for the artist.

The Vampire painting, also known as Love and Pain, caused a stir when it was first exhibited in Berlin in 1902. It was part of a 20-work project called Frieze of Life that explored themes of love, betrayal, death and sex and included his masterpiece, The Scream.

“Like ‘The Scream,’ it distills extraordinarily intense feelings,” Simon Shaw, head of Sotheby’s impressionist and modern art, said Tuesday. “The lovers, locked in their dark embrace, evoke love’s paradox as a source of tenderness and pain.”

An avid Munch collector bought Vampire in 1903. In 1934, it was purchased by a private collector, who has owned it since. It was on loan at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for about 10 years.

Vampire will be the highlight of Sotheby’s sale of impressionist and modern art.

Copyright 2008 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-ES-09-23-08 1149EDT

Famed portrait photographer’s heirs sue New York gallery over lost art

NEW YORK (AP) – Relatives of one of the world’s most famous portrait photographers have sued a Manhattan gallery, saying it lost valuable photographs created with Spanish surrealist master Salvador Dalí.

A daughter and two grandchildren of the late Philippe Halsman say in a lawsuitthat 41 of the works created by Halsman and Dalí were reported stolen in April 2007.

The works were among dozens delivered to the Howard Greenberg Gallery in 2003 and 2004.

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Detail: Francis Bacon Triptych - August 1972 1972 Tate © Estate of Francis Bacon. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2007

Retrospective of Francis Bacon’s paintings opens at London’s Tate

Detail: Francis Bacon Triptych - August 1972 1972 Tate © Estate of Francis Bacon. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2007

Detail: Francis Bacon Triptych – August 1972 1972 Tate © Estate of Francis Bacon. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2007

LONDON (AP) – No artist captured the horror of the 20th century quite the way Francis Bacon did.

Bacon spent a lifetime painting the human body in a world ripped apart by the slaughter of two world wars and the Holocaust. More than 15 years after his death, a major new retrospective bound for London, Madrid and New York shows that his twisted forms, mottled flesh and screaming mouths have lost none of their power to shock.

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Stolen Picasso etchings recovered

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) – Authorities say they’ve recovered two Picasso etchings stolen from a Palm Beach art gallery in May.

Police arrested 37-year-old Marcus Patmon at his Miami home on Friday. Authorities say he tried to sell Le Repas Frugel, valued at $395,000, to a California art dealer in July. But the dealer checked the Art Loss Registry and discovered that it had been reported stolen.

Authorities tracked Patmon to his home, where they found the other piece, the Jacqueline Lisant etching, valued at $145,000.

Patmon was charged with dealing in stolen property. He also had an outstanding warrant for driving with a suspended license. Authorities say charges of burglary and grand theft are pending. He was released on $10,500 bail.

Copyright 2008 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-09-07-08 0430EDT

Fernand Leger's 1921 oil on canvas titled Woman and Child, missing from the Wellesley College Collection. A reward of $100,000 has been offered for its return. Copyright Wellesley College. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Wellesley museum loses prized 1921 Cubist painting by Fernand Leger

Fernand Leger's 1921 oil on canvas titled Woman and Child, missing from the Wellesley College Collection. A reward of $100,000 has been offered for its return. Copyright Wellesley College. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Fernand Leger’s 1921 oil on canvas titled Woman and Child, missing from the Wellesley College Collection. A reward of $100,000 has been offered for its return. Copyright Wellesley College. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

WELLESLEY, Mass. (AP) – Wellesley College has lost a 1921 painting by French cubist Fernand Leger that was likely worth millions of dollars, officials said.

Woman and Child had been in the collection of the college’s Davis Museum and Cultural Center since 1954. It vanished last year after it was one of 32 works borrowed for an exhibit at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, The Boston Globe reported on Aug. 27.

“We’ve all wondered about it,” Jacqueline Marie Musacchio, associate professor of art at Wellesley, told the newspaper. “It’s a tremendous loss for the college, but, beyond that, we just don’t have a lot of information.”

Police were told, and the museum’s insurer, Travelers Insurance, has paid a claim. Last year, Leger’s paintings sold for an average of $2.8 million, and the newspaper quoted an unidentified Travelers official as saying the payout was “in that area.”

Travelers is offering a $100,000 reward for the painting, the Globe said.

The painting was a 1954 gift to Wellesley from Professor and Mrs. John McAndrew, given in honor of Alfred H. Barr Jr.  Professor McAndrew was not only a faculty member but also director of Wellesley College’s museum.

Along with 31 other works from Wellesley’s collection, Woman and Child was lent to the Oklahoma City Museum of Art for exhibition and returned in April 2007.

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Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers / Fame Bureau Limited

British museum buys Rolling Stones’ lips artwork at auction

Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers / Fame Bureau Limited

LONDON (AP) – Mick Jagger’s pout is officially fit for a museum.

London’s Victoria and Albert Museum announced Tuesday that it bought the original artwork for The Rolling Stones’ famous “lips” logo, inspired by the singer’s mouth. The museum said it bought the work at an auction in the United States for $92,500.

The lips-and-tongue logo was designed by London art student John Pasche in 1970, and first used on the band’s Sticky Fingers album the next year.

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Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008), a master of Abstract Expressionism and pop art. Photo courtesy of Morris Museum of Art.

Morris Museum of Art to reinstall Rauschenberg’s August Allegory (Anagrams)

Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008), a master of Abstract Expressionism and pop art. Photo courtesy of Morris Museum of Art.

Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008), a master of Abstract Expressionism and pop art. Photo courtesy of Morris Museum of Art.

AUGUSTA, Ga. – On Sept. 21, in celebration of Augusta’s inaugural Westobou Festival, the Morris Museum of Art will unveil Robert Rauschenberg’s August Allegory (Anagrams) in its new location in the auditorium lobby on the museum’s first floor.

“Rauschenberg was undeniably one of the great figures in American art,” said Louise Keith Claussen, Director of Fine Arts at Morris Communications Co. and former director of the Morris Museum of Art, “and we are very fortunate to have some of his works in the collection of the Morris Museum, particularly fortunate to have a major work that is specific to Augusta, Georgia.”

Commissioned in 1996 and completed in 1997, Rauschenberg’s August Allegory is an extremely large – roughly 5 by 12 feet – work on paper, a montage, printed in vegetable dyes, created from the artist’s original photographs. Rauschenberg, working in collaboration with his partner Darryl Pottorf and assisted by the Morris’s former deputy director Rick Gruber, conducted the original shoot during a three-day visit to Augusta. Details of the work-in-progress appeared in the September 1996 issue of Vogue magazine in an article on the artist and his career.

Claussen, director of the museum when the Rauschenberg was commissioned, wrote recently that “the work reflects his response to both the details and spirit of Augusta as he saw it, and elements include several church steeples, Springfield Church, Sacred Heart Cultural Center, a 19th-century textile mill, the Confederate monument, a railroad bridge, an antebellum home, Augusta bricks, the ‘haunted pillar,’ and the feet of the bronze sculpture of Arnold Palmer.”

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This image of the port of Marseille was produced in 1929 by Roger Broders. Image courtesy Poster Connection.

Streamlined Dreams: Deco Posters

This image of the port of Marseille was produced in 1929 by Roger Broders. Image courtesy Poster Connection.

This image of the port of Marseille was produced in 1929 by Roger Broders. Image courtesy Poster Connection.

They look chic with spare, contemporary interiors. They complement Mid-century industrial styles. And they fit beautifully, of course, with furnishings from the 1920s and ’30s.

Art Deco posters make a 20th-century statement that has resonated ever since their creation.

They are also in great demand among collectors, and their values have soared since the 1990s. In spite of this upsurge, there are still relatively affordable Deco posters that cover a range of themes and subjects in striking, brilliant designs.

Joerg and Joern Weigelt are father and son poster dealers who have shops on either side of the Western world. Both have a strong appreciation for the Deco style.

The family penchant for posters began in 1978 at a flea market, Joerg Weigelt explained, where he found a postcard, dated 1910, of a Ludwig Hohlwein poster. “This was our first contact with posters – a small poster reproduced on a postcard. After that, we started looking for posters in their full sizes.”

In 1982 he opened Galerie fur Gebrauchsgraphik (Gallery for Commercial Art) in Hannover, Germany. Back then, “people wanted artists like Franz von Stuck and Alphonse Mucha, and any really old posters. But there were some forward-looking collectors and dealers who were already turning their attention to the late 1910s, 1920s and 1930s,” according to Joerg.

By the early 1990s, historism, which imitated styles from older periods, and Art Nouveau posters were out of reach for most collectors. “So people had no choice but to look for new areas of interest,” and they turned to the 1920s, Joerg said.

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