Artifacts looted during colonial period returned to Sri Lanka and Indonesia

The Cannon of Kandy, shown in an undated photo provided by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The lavishly decorated cannon is among six pieces that the museum is returning to Sri Lanka; Dutch East India Company troops looted the cannon in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit the Rijksmuseum. Shared under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.
The Cannon of Kandy, shown in an undated photo provided by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The lavishly decorated cannon is among six pieces that the museum is returning to Sri Lanka; Dutch East India Company troops looted the cannon in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit the Rijksmuseum. Shared under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.
The Cannon of Kandy, shown in an undated photo provided by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The lavishly decorated cannon is among six pieces that the museum is returning to Sri Lanka; Dutch East India Company troops looted the cannon in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit the Rijksmuseum. Shared under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) – Two Dutch museums have handed over hundreds of cultural artifacts back to Indonesia and Sri Lanka – from a richly decorated cannon to precious metals and jewelry – that were taken, often by force, in the colonial era. The government announced the planned restitution of 478 “cultural objects” on July 6. Some Western nations are returning looted artifacts and other objects as part of a reckoning with their often brutal colonial histories.

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Guggenheim’s iconic skylight named for Lawson-Johnston family

The iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed skylight in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York recently has been named the Lawson-Johnston Family Oculus. Peter Lawson-Johnston, grandson of Solomon R. Guggenheim, has been a museum board member for more than 50 years, and other members of his family have served the institution in other capacities. Image courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
The iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed skylight in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York recently has been named the Lawson-Johnston Family Oculus. Peter Lawson-Johnston, grandson of Solomon R. Guggenheim, has been a museum board member for more than 50 years, and other members of his family have served the institution in other capacities. Image courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
The iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed skylight in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York recently has been named the Lawson-Johnston Family Oculus. Peter Lawson-Johnston, grandson of Solomon R. Guggenheim, has been a museum board member for more than 50 years, and other members of his family have served the institution in other capacities. Image courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

NEW YORK — The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, announces the naming of its iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed skylight in recognition of a major gift by the Lawson-Johnston family, which will benefit the museum’s general operations. The Lawson-Johnston Family Oculus honors the family’s significant contribution to the museum’s leadership. Peter Lawson-Johnston, the grandson of Solomon R. Guggenheim, has served on the foundation’s Board of Trustees for more than 50 years and is a past chairman. Two of his children, Peter Lawson-Johnston II and Wendy L-J. McNeil, are current members of the board, and his daughter, Mimi Lawson-Johnston Howe, is president of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Advisory Board.

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Europe’s great churches struggle to accommodate both worshippers and tourists

Interior of the Sagrada Familia Basilica in Barcelona, Spain, designed by Antoni Gaudi, photographed in September 2014. It is among the many iconic churches and religious buildings in Europe that have struggled to remain functional as sites of worship while also welcoming tourists. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Ank Kumar. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Interior of the Sagrada Familia Basilica in Barcelona, Spain, designed by Antoni Gaudi, photographed in September 2014. It is among the many iconic churches and religious buildings in Europe that have struggled to remain functional as sites of worship while also welcoming tourists. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Ank Kumar. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) – A recent Saturday evening Mass at Sagrada Familia parish had all the hallmarks of a neighborhood worship service, from prayers for ill and deceased members to name-day wishes for two congregants in the pews. But it also featured security checks to get in and curious tourists peering down to take photos of the worshippers from above. The regular Mass is held in the crypt of modernist architect Antoni Gaudi’s masterpiece church, one of Europe’s most visited monuments. With tourism reaching or surpassing pre-pandemic records in Barcelona and across southern Europe, iconic sacred sites are struggling to accommodate the faithful who come to pray and the millions of visitors who often pay to view the art and architecture.

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Gemstone releases 2023-24 edition of Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide

Image courtesy of Gemstone Publishing
Image courtesy of Gemstone Publishing

HUNT VALLEY, Md. – On Wednesday, July 19, The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide #53 arrived in comic book stores. The bible of serious comic book collectors, dealers, and historians since it was first published in 1970, the hardbound guide is released each July by Gemstone Publishing. Compiled by founder Robert M. Overstreet with contributions from an extensive roster of Overstreet Advisors, the Guide offers insight into the complex and exciting comic book market.

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Bob Dylan’s 1914 Scottish Highlands estate lists for $3.9M

Bob Dylan’s 18,357-square-foot mansion in the Scottish highlands includes 16 bedrooms, each with lovely garden views, and 11 bathrooms. Image courtesy of Knight Frank and TopTenRealEstateDeals.com
Bob Dylan’s 18,357-square-foot mansion in the Scottish highlands includes 16 bedrooms, each with lovely garden views, and 11 bathrooms. Image courtesy of Knight Frank and TopTenRealEstateDeals.com
Bob Dylan’s 18,357-square-foot mansion in the Scottish highlands includes 16 bedrooms, each with garden views, and 11 bathrooms. Image courtesy of Knight Frank and TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

NETHY BRIDGE, Scotland – Bob Dylan, one of America’s greatest songwriters, rose to fame during the 1960s with hits such as Blowin’ in the Wind and The Times They Are A-Changin’. His songs captured the tumultuous spirit of the time and became anthems for the anti-war and civil rights movements. The winner of 10 Grammy awards, an Academy Award, a Pulitzer Prize, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Dylan has sold more than 145 million albums and performed more than 3,000 shows. Now 82, Dylan continues to tour, having recently wrapped up his European concert series. In addition to his musical career, Dylan has published nine books of paintings and drawings and his visual art has been exhibited at major galleries. For the last 17 years, he has owned a stately mansion known as Aultmore House in Nethy Bridge in the Cairngorm National Park in Scotland. Unable to visit it since the Covid-19 pandemic, Dylan has listed the property for sale, accepting offers in excess of £3,000,000, or $3.9 million.

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Institut Giacometti dedicates show to Alberto Giacometti’s ‘The Nose’

Alberto Giacometti, ‘Le Nez (The Nose),’ 1947 (version from 1949). Bronze 81.2 by 78.1 by 38.5.cm. Fondation Giacometti, © Succession Alberto Giacometti / Adagp, Paris 2023
Alberto Giacometti, ‘Le Nez (The Nose),’ 1947 (version from 1949).Bronze 81.2 by 78.1 by 38.5.cm. Fondation Giacometti, © Succession Alberto Giacometti / Adagp, Paris 2023
Alberto Giacometti, ‘Le Nez (The Nose),’ 1947 (version from 1949). Bronze 81.2 by 78.1 by 38.5.cm. Fondation Giacometti, © Succession Alberto Giacometti / Adagp, Paris 2023

PARIS – Institut Giacometti will mount an exhibition dedicated to the artist’s iconic work, The Nose. Continuing its exploration of the work of Alberto Giacometti, Institut Giacometti will bring together all versions of The Nose, a sculpture that was revisited by the artist during several years. One version of The Nose that is too fragile to be moved will be presented via a virtual production. The show opens on October 7 and will remain on view through January 7, 2024.

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Strength of Western art market was validated at Lebel’s Santa Fe show

A tremendous variety of Western and Native art and antiques graced this room display created by Joe Fionda of Lufkin, Texas. Image courtesy of Brian Lebel’s Old West Events

SANTA FE, N.M. – Visitors from throughout the United States as well as Canada, Mexico, Germany, Belgium and Japan converged on New Mexico’s state capital over the weekend of June 23-25 for the sole purpose of shopping at Brian Lebel’s incomparable Cody Old West Show & Auction, now in its 33rd year.

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Old World Auctions sale of antique maps navigated its way to $290K

Detail of Henry Abraham Chatelain’s 1719 New World map, ‘Carte Tres Curieuse de la Mer du Sud,’ $17,250
Henry Abraham Chatelain’s 1719 New World map, ‘Carte Tres Curieuse de la Mer du Sud,’ $17,250
Henry Abraham Chatelain’s 1719 New World map, ‘Carte Tres Curieuse de la Mer du Sud,’ $17,250

RICHMOND, Va. – A spectacular wall map celebrating the New World – Henry Abraham Chatelain’s Carte Tres Curieuse de la Mer du Sud – and rare maps from 1622 and 1596 were among the top-selling items in Old World Auctions’ latest auction, which ran for two weeks and ended on June 21. Of the nearly 800 lots in the auction, 78% sold, and the event totaled $290,000.

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Palm Springs Art Museum show examines Mexican graphic design

Santiago Martinez Alberu, ‘Suave, No.1,’ 2019. Courtesy the designer.
Santiago Martinez Alberu, ‘Suave, No.1,’ 2019. Courtesy the designer.

PALM SPRINGS, Calif. – Palm Springs Art Museum announces a new exhibition of graphic design from Mexico’s past and present to examine the field’s development during the past century and its role in the country’s popular culture. The exhibition, Eso es la vida/This is life, includes examples of posters, typography and sign-painting, as well as video and digital media that reveal visual communication as a vital facet of everyday life. It runs from August 12 through November 27 at the museum’s Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion.

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Bronze Viking die found by metal detectorist tops $19K at auction

Noonans Specialist in Coins and Artefacts Nigel Mills stated that the ancient bronze Viking die might have bene used to ornament the cheek guards of an iron helmet. Image courtesy of Noonans
An 11th-century bronze Viking die, discovered in a field in Norfolk, England by a metal detectorist, auctioned for a hammer price of £15,000 (about $19,300) on July 18. Image courtesy of Noonans, photo credit Jason Jones
An 11th-century bronze Viking die, discovered in January in a field in Norfolk, England by a metal detectorist, auctioned for a hammer price of £15,000 (about $19,300) on July 18. Image courtesy of Noonans, photo credit Jason Jones

LONDON – An 11th-century bronze Viking die that was discovered in a field in Norfolk, England by a metal detectorist achieved a hammer price of £15,000 (about $19,300) at the Noonans Mayfair auction house on July 18 in its Ancient Coins and Antiquities sale. It was bought by a collector in the UK.