The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, photographed in May 2017 from an angle that shows the E Claiborne and Lora Robins Sculpture Gardens. On March 15, the museum announced it had received a gift of $60 million from James W. McGlothlin and Frances Gibson McGlothlin. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

Virginia museum receives gift worth nearly $60 million

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, photographed in May 2017 from an angle that shows the E Claiborne and Lora Robins Sculpture Gardens. On March 15, the museum announced it had received a gift of $60 million from James W. McGlothlin and Frances Gibson McGlothlin. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, photographed in May 2017 from an angle that shows the E Claiborne and Lora Robins Sculpture Gardens. On March 15, the museum announced it had received a gift of $60 million from James W. McGlothlin and Frances Gibson McGlothlin. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts announces that it has received a gift worth nearly $60 million, including a significant contribution to the museum’s expansion campaign and 15 paintings by prominent American artists.

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An Oxford, England house with a sculpture of a shark sticking out of its roof has received protected landmark status, to the dismay of the home’s owner. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Attribution: The shark at Headington by Gareth James. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

UK ‘Shark House’ owner dismayed at getting protected status

An Oxford, England house with a sculpture of a shark sticking out of its roof has received protected landmark status, to the dismay of the home’s owner. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Attribution: The shark at Headington by Gareth James. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

An Oxford, England house with a sculpture of a shark sticking out of its roof has received protected landmark status, to the dismay of the home’s owner. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Attribution: The shark at Headington by Gareth James. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

LONDON (AP) – The 25-foot tall (7.6 meter) sculpture of a shark crashing through the roof of Magnus Hanson-Heine’s house in rural Oxford, England, is now a protected landmark – and he’s not happy about it.

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Report: auction industry is preventing millions of tonnes of carbon emissions

Old-growth European beech forest in Biogradska Gora National Park, Montenegro. Photo by Snežana Trifunović, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

LONDON – New research from Auction Technology Group plc (LON:ATG), the operator of the world’s leading marketplaces for curated online auctions, has found that one million tonnes of carbon emissions were saved in 2021 by the sale of just 15 item types at auctions run on its marketplaces globally. This is the equivalent of 50 million mature trees growing for one year and only accounts for 6% of the 9.5 million items sold across ATG’s platforms in the period.¹

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November 2011 image of an ancient Buddhist settlement at Mes Anyak in Afghanistan. Taliban leaders who once ordered the destruction of Buddhist sculptures are now committed to preserving Mes Anyak’s art and artifacts to please Chinese investors attracted by a nearby copper mine. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Jerome Starkey. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

With an eye on funding from China, Taliban now preserves Buddhas

November 2011 image of an ancient Buddhist settlement at Mes Anyak in Afghanistan. Taliban leaders who once ordered the destruction of Buddhist sculptures are now committed to preserving Mes Anyak’s art and artifacts to please Chinese investors attracted by a nearby copper mine. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Jerome Starkey. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.


November 2011 image of an ancient Buddhist settlement at Mes Anyak in Afghanistan. Taliban leaders who once ordered the destruction of Buddhist sculptures are now committed to preserving Mes Anyak’s art and artifacts to please Chinese investors attracted by a nearby copper mine. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, photo credit Jerome Starkey. Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

MES AYNAK, Afghanistan (AP) – The ancient Buddha statues sit in serene meditation in the caves carved into the russet cliffs of rural Afghanistan. Hundreds of meters below lies what is believed to be the world’s largest deposit of copper. Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers are pinning their hopes on Beijing to turn that rich vein into revenue to salvage the cash-starved country amid crippling international sanctions.

The fighters standing guard by the rocky hillside may once have considered destroying the terracotta Buddhas. Two decades ago when the Islamic hard-line Taliban were first in power, they sparked world outrage by blowing up gigantic Buddha statues in another part of the country, calling them pagan symbols that must be purged. But now they are intent on preserving the relics of the Mes Aynak copper mine. Doing so is key to unlocking billions in Chinese investment, said Hakumullah Mubariz, the Taliban head of security at the site, peering into the remnants of a monastery built by first-century Buddhist monks.

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Skinner names Phillip Thomas its first designer in residence

Skinner Auctioneers has named Phillip Thomas its first designer in residence. Image courtesy of Phillip Thomas Inc., and Skinner Auctioneers

Skinner Auctioneers has named Phillip Thomas its first designer in residence. Image courtesy of Phillip Thomas Inc., and Skinner Auctioneers

MARLBOROUGH, Mass. — Skinner Auctioneers announces the appointment of interior designer Phillip Thomas as the auction house’s inaugural designer in residence, strengthening Skinner’s long-held relationship with Thomas. Having collaborated with him on a number of design events and sales since 2018, Thomas’ appointment demonstrates Skinner’s innovative approach to auctions as an avenue for interior design.

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Courtney Mattison, ‘Hope Spots: Coral Triangle 3,’ 2022. 17 by 16 by 9in. Glazed stoneware and porcelain

Ceramic art celebrated in Palos Verdes Art Center show

Courtney Mattison, ‘Hope Spots: Coral Triangle 3,’ 2022. 17 by 16 by 9in. Glazed stoneware and porcelain

Courtney Mattison, ‘Hope Spots: Coral Triangle 3,’ 2022. 17 by 16 by 9in. Glazed stoneware and porcelain

PALOS VERDES, Calif. – The Palos Verdes Art Center / Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education is currently showing Water, Earth & Fire, an exhibition celebrating ceramics as a powerful creative force and expressive mode of communication. It will run through April 16.

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A copy of Marvel Comics #1 colloquially known as the ‘pay copy’ sold for more than $2.4 million on March 17. Image courtesy of ComicConnect.

Super-valued: special copy of Marvel Comics #1 auctioned for $2.4M

A copy of Marvel Comics #1 colloquially known as the ‘pay copy’ sold for more than $2.4 million on March 17. Image courtesy of ComicConnect.

A copy of Marvel Comics #1 colloquially known as the ‘pay copy’ sold for more than $2.4 million on March 17. Image courtesy of ComicConnect.

NEW YORK (AP) – A particularly prized copy of the first-ever Marvel comic book sold for more than $2.4 million in an online auction on March 18. Known as the Marvel Comics #1 “pay copy,” it’s “arguably one of the top three comic books in the world of comics collecting,” said Vincent Zurzolo, chief operating officer of ComicConnect. The New York-based auctioneer sold the book on St. Patrick’s Day for a bit under $2,427,800.

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The former Malibu home of supermodel Cindy Crawford listed for $99.5 million. Image courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com. Photo credit: Courtesy of Coldwell Banker Realty

Cindy Crawford’s former Malibu mansion listed for $99.5M

Left, the former Malibu home of supermodel Cindy Crawford listed for $99.5 million. Right, a Pacific Palisades residence owned by Brooke Shields sold for $7.5 million. Both images Courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com. Photo credit for Cindy Crawford home: Courtesy of Coldwell Banker Realty. Photo credit for Brooke Shields home: Adrian Van Anz

Left, the former Malibu home of supermodel Cindy Crawford listed for $99.5 million. Right, a Pacific Palisades residence owned by Brooke Shields that sold for $7.5 million. Both images courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com. Photo of former Cindy Crawford home courtesy of Coldwell Banker Realty. Photo of former Brooke Shields home by Adrian Van Anz

LOS ANGELES – Southern California homes formerly owned by supermodel Cindy Crawford and actress Brooke Shields have drawn interested buyers, with Crawford’s one-time Malibu property listing for $99.5 million and Shields’s Pacific Palisades residence selling for $7.4 million.

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The Dallas-based Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art has created a deck of cards featuring Nazi-looted art in hopes of locating the missing works. Image courtesy of the Monuments Men Foundation

Foundation bets on Monuments Men card decks to help find missing art

The Dallas-based Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art has created a deck of cards featuring Nazi-looted art in hopes of locating the missing works. Image courtesy of the Monuments Men Foundation

The Dallas-based Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art has created a deck of cards featuring Nazi-looted art in hopes of locating the missing works. Image courtesy of the Monuments Men Foundation

DALLAS (AP) – A group dedicated to finishing the work of World War II’s Monuments Men is betting on a deck of playing cards – and reward money – to help find missing works of art taken by the Nazis. Inspired by the U.S. military’s history of creating playing cards related to missions, the Dallas-based Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art on March 23 announced the creation of the deck focusing on works – including paintings, sculptures and reliquaries – they believe still exist.

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Joseph Richardson Sr., American (Philadelphia 1711-1784), the Hannah Emelen Logan teapot, c. 1745. American, silver and wood, 14cm (5 1/2in.), 539 g. Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, the Pollack collection, gift of Daniel A. Pollack AB ’60 and Susan F. Pollack AB ’64, 2020.199

Harvard Art Museums receive American silver gift

Joseph Richardson Sr., American (Philadelphia 1711-1784), the Hannah Emelen Logan teapot, c. 1745. American, silver and wood, 14cm (5 1/2in.), 539 g. Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, the Pollack collection, gift of Daniel A. Pollack AB ’60 and Susan F. Pollack AB ’64, 2020.199

Joseph Richardson Sr., American (Philadelphia 1711-1784), the Hannah Emelen Logan teapot, c. 1745. American, silver and wood, 14cm (5 1/2in.), 539 g. Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, the Pollack collection, gift of Daniel A. Pollack AB ’60 and Susan F. Pollack AB ’64, 2020.199

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – The Harvard Art Museums have received a gift of 21 works of 18th-century American silver from the collection of Daniel A. Pollack and Susan F. Pollack. The gift comprises a range of vessels and table implements intended for domestic use, including cups, bowls, spoons, tankards and teapots crafted by noted silversmiths from Boston, New York and Philadelphia.

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