Ships On the Hudson River, Under the Palisades, 1883/4, published by Frederick Schiller Cozzens (American: 1846-1928), colored lithograph mounted on card, signed and dated 1/1 in printing. Dimensions: 14¼ inches by 20¼ inches. Presale estimate $300-$500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

Oct. 7 Early Amer. Prints auction to benefit NYC AIDS charity

Ships On the Hudson River, Under the Palisades, 1883/4, published by Frederick Schiller Cozzens (American: 1846-1928), colored lithograph mounted on card, signed and dated 1/1 in printing. Dimensions: 14¼ inches by 20¼ inches. Presale estimate $300-$500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

Ships On the Hudson River, Under the Palisades, 1883/4, published by Frederick Schiller Cozzens (American: 1846-1928), colored lithograph mounted on card, signed and dated 1/1 in printing. Dimensions: 14¼ inches by 20¼ inches. Presale estimate $300-$500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

NEW YORK (ACNI) – On Wednesday, Oct. 7, LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding for a charity auction benefiting Housing Works, the largest community-based AIDS service organization in the United States. Since 1990, this dedicated nonprofit has provided life-saving services, such as housing, medical and mental health care, meals, job training, drug treatment, HIV prevention education, and social support to more than 20,000 homeless and low-income New Yorkers living with HIV and AIDS.

The Oct. 7 sale – the first live auction ever to be conducted by the charitable group – will feature 56 lots containing 60 early American prints, including dozens by Currier & Ives. The prints, hand-selected from a donated corporate collection of 300 prints, include affordable examples estimated at $100-$200, as well as others that are expected to fetch as much as $600-$1,000 apiece. All profits will benefit the excellent programs administered by Housing Works.

David Thorpe, director of communications for Housing Works, said he and his colleagues have high hopes that the upcoming sale will raise their profile beyond the local community and serve as a role model for other cities.

“Since 1994 we have held ‘window auctions,’ in which people can go online and view items in the windows of our nine area thrift shops, then place an e-mailed or in-person bid,” Thorpe said. “These shops have become a very popular institution in New York. They look more like boutiques than thrift shops, and because all the funds go to homeless people with HIV, the community responds with new merchandise every day. Now we are working with LiveAuctioneers to take it to a higher level. The auction world doesn’t really know us that well, so this is a great way for them to find out about what we do.”

Thorpe said the inaugural live and Internet auction on Oct. 7 is “a trial balloon” for Housing Works. “If it goes well, we’d love to do more in the future.”

To add a special touch to the inaugural auction, a 6 p.m. VIP cocktail hour with celebrity appraisers will be held immediately prior to the 7 p.m. sale at the Housing Works Gramercy Thrift Shop, 157 E. 23rd St. between Lexington Avenue and Third Avenue. The party is being hosted by longtime Housing Works volunteer and renowned appraiser Kathleen Guzman, who also will serve as auctioneer during the sale.

Guests paying $50 admission will be able to chat and mingle with Guzman and some of her fellow Antiques Roadshow appraisers – including Daile Kaplan, Nicholas Lowry, Eric Silver and Joyce Jonas – and be treated to champagne, light hors d’oeuvres and sweets from Martine’s Fine Chocolates of Bloomingdale’s. Tickets may be purchased at the door or online at www.housingworks.org/earlyamericanprints.

LiveAuctioneers’ CEO Julian R. Ellison strongly supports the efforts of Housing Works and has thrown the full weight of his company’s promotional force behind the Oct. 7 auction debut. “We at LiveAuctioneers are dedicated to the concept of public service and have assisted dozens of nonprofits and charities in their auction fundraising efforts,” he said. “By providing a group like Housing Works with the all-important Internet live-bidding connection they require in order to reach an international audience of buyers, we help them to maximize their profit potential and increase the number of individuals who can benefit in the long run.”

For additional information on the auction or the programs available through Housing Works, call 212-645-8111. View the fully illustrated catalog for Housing Works’ Oct. 7 auction and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at https://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/19739.

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ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Longtime Housing Works volunteer and celebrity appraiser/auctioneer Kathleen Guzman will preside over the Oct. 7 auction. Image courtesy Housing Works.

Longtime Housing Works volunteer and celebrity appraiser/auctioneer Kathleen Guzman will preside over the Oct. 7 auction. Image courtesy Housing Works.


Lake Mohonk, New York – published by Currier & Ives, hand-colored engraving (Conningham), 8¼ inches by 12¼ inches, Kennedy Galleries label on verso. Presale estimate $100-$200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

Lake Mohonk, New York – published by Currier & Ives, hand-colored engraving (Conningham), 8¼ inches by 12¼ inches, Kennedy Galleries label on verso. Presale estimate $100-$200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.


Grand Central Depot, New York, 1872 – mid-19th century, anonymous publisher, 13¼ inches by 20 inches, Kennedy Galleries label on verso. Presale estimate $100-$200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

Grand Central Depot, New York, 1872 – mid-19th century, anonymous publisher, 13¼ inches by 20 inches, Kennedy Galleries label on verso. Presale estimate $100-$200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.


Washington Family, after William Savage, publisher Charles Hart, lithographer L.M. Delevan, hand-colored lithograph. Dimensions: 16¾ inches by 23 5/8 inches. Kennedy Galleries label on verso. Presale estimate $100-$200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

Washington Family, after William Savage, publisher Charles Hart, lithographer L.M. Delevan, hand-colored lithograph. Dimensions: 16¾ inches by 23 5/8 inches. Kennedy Galleries label on verso. Presale estimate $100-$200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers and Housing Works.

Row of slave quarters adjacent to the crop fields at Kingsley Plantation in Jacksonville, Florida. Structures show effects of erosion, vandalism and subsequent restoration. Public domain image.

Virginia man pieces together history from slave cabin

Row of slave quarters adjacent to the crop fields at Kingsley Plantation in Jacksonville, Florida. Structures show effects of erosion, vandalism and subsequent restoration. Public domain image.

Row of slave quarters adjacent to the crop fields at Kingsley Plantation in Jacksonville, Florida. Structures show effects of erosion, vandalism and subsequent restoration. Public domain image.

LADYSMITH, Va. (AP) – The weathered cabin with the stone chimney regularly coughs up pieces of its past. A blue glass slave bead. A Civil War-era pipe. Kitchen utensils. A silver wedding band. Porcelain doorknobs.

Richard Moter carefully collects each offering, cataloging and dating the items as best he can.

Here’s a Navy button, dating to the 1870s, that he scraped from inside the chimney. And a bottle of cologne he pulled from under the front step, probably from the 1890s.

There’s a silk stocking from beneath the floorboards. And an eggbeater found in the wall. And a pewter cameo discovered near the cistern.

“There’s a lot of history here,” said Moter, 44, the caretaker of the cabin, which stands on his family’s Woodford property.

“A lot of these sites have been destroyed by loggers and landowners. I’m in here just trying to piece together the story.”

More than 150 years ago, the cabin housed slaves who toiled at the Poplar Grove plantation. After the Civil War, it was likely home to farm laborers.

Over the years, a series of residents patched up holes, modified doors, painted the beams and hung floral wallpaper, scraps of which still cling to the walls.

Sometime after 1936, when electricity came to rural Caroline County, someone screwed light bulbs into the cabin’s ceiling.

No one has lived in the two-story structure for probably 50 years, and its wood frame is weak and drafty.

But as a surviving example of slave housing, it offers history buffs like Moter – along with archaeological experts – a unique window into the past.

“This is a real survivor,” said Gary Stanton, a folklorist and historic-preservation professor at the University of Mary Washington who recently visited the cabin. “Usually this stuff’s plowed up and we never see it.”

Stanton and UMW colleague Carter Hudgins, a historian who also has training in historical archaeology, were invited by Moter to visit the cabin, along with a Free Lance-Star reporter.

Both professors have visited the remains of slave cabins throughout the area, working under a National Endowment for the Humanities grant secured by UMW Historic Preservation Chairman Doug Sanford and Dennis Pogue, associate director of restoration at Mount Vernon.

“It’s obviously gone through a lot of changes, but the carcass of the earliest part is still here,” said Hudgins, running a hand along a plank on the cabin’s second floor.

They plan to return to the property to measure the house and take more photographs, entering the information into a database that tracks the architecture of slave housing across decades and regions.

Using historical records, old fire insurance policies and evidence from existing buildings, the research team has collected descriptions of about 900 slave quarters in Virginia _ most of which are no longer standing, Sanford said.

“The good news is there are a lot more out there than we originally thought,” he said. “The bad news is a lot of them are not in great shape. People do not have the money to preserve them or restore them. Time is of the essence.”

Moter said he worries that his cabin may be on borrowed time.

Another on the property burned down in the 1950s, and what’s to say a strong wind won’t come along and finish the job time has already begun?

Until then, he painstakingly gathers all the treasures the cabin is willing to give up, hoping they’ll help him piece together the stories of those who once lived there.

Moter, a descendant of the Pratt family, grew up in the Westmont neighborhood of Fredericksburg.

He estimates his family owns about 10 historic properties in the area, including the old farm where he lives.

He built more than a few leaf forts on those properties as a youngster. But it wasn’t until adulthood, he said, that he came to appreciate the history socked away in those fields and forests.

Exploring them gave him direction, he said.

Before that, he traveled a bit out west, did some odd jobs, played his guitar, “made some mistakes, fixed some mistakes.”

His late great-uncle Beverley Crump Pratt, a local historian and attorney, inspired him to delve into the area’s past, said Moter, who has been at it faithfully for about a decade.

He reads a lot, particularly firsthand accounts of early life in these parts and the oral histories of former slaves, gathered during the 1930s under the Federal Writers Project.

As an amateur archaeologist, he sticks primarily to his family’s land, places like Camden, Auburn and Cedar Creek.

Sometimes he has used a metal detector, other times a shovel. Often, he has relied on historical maps and his own two hands.

He has uncovered farm tools, jewelry, pottery and horseshoes.

At the cabin behind his home, he has found old picture frames, doll parts and a button made of bone dating to the 1860s. Nearby, he dug up two poker chips and several marbles that may go as far back as the Colonial era.

“It’s like a giant pachinko machine,” Hudgins said of the cabin. “Stuff is just falling out.”

Moter said he has sold one or two items over the years to make ends meet. But he has no plans to sell any more.

He’d like to see the items displayed, possibly in the National Museum of African American History and Culture, set to open on the National Mall in 2015.

His work in and around the cabin has given him a much greater understanding of what life must have been like for slaves, Moter said. He hopes his collection can ultimately do the same for others.

“I’ve had quite a few emotional moments while doing it,” he said. “It’s a very serious, heavy thing, not to be taken lightly at all. You’re looking into people’s lives and you’re looking back into times when people suffered. I’m kind of here to clear the air of all the karma.”

___

Information from: The Free Lance-Star,
http://www.fredericksburg.com/

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-09-29-09 2029EDT

Swedish stage and film director Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), and cinematographer Sven Nykvist (1922-2006) during the production of the 1960 film Through a Glass Darkly. Svensk Filmindustri (SF) press photo, photographer unknown. Source: Svenska filminstitutet.

Ingmar Bergman items sold at auction in Sweden

Swedish stage and film director Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), and cinematographer Sven Nykvist (1922-2006) during the production of the 1960 film Through a Glass Darkly. Svensk Filmindustri (SF) press photo, photographer unknown. Source: Svenska filminstitutet.

Swedish stage and film director Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), and cinematographer Sven Nykvist (1922-2006) during the production of the 1960 film Through a Glass Darkly. Svensk Filmindustri (SF) press photo, photographer unknown. Source: Svenska filminstitutet.

STOCKHOLM (AP) – A chipped and incomplete chess set believed to have featured in one of Ingmar Bergman’s best known films fetched one of the highest bids at a special auction for the late director’s belongings, auction house officials said Tuesday.

The set, which had been valued at around 10,000-15,000 kronor ($1,430-$2,150), sold for 1 million kronor ($142,000), said Charlotte Bergstrom, a spokeswoman at Bukowskis in Stockholm. It is missing a white king and is believed to have been used in The Seventh Seal, one of Bergman’s most famous films.

“In one part of the film, Max von Sydow sweeps his mantle over the table and the (chess) pieces fall to the ground and you can see that the white king breaks into pieces,” Bergstrom said.

Bergstrom said the auction began Monday and lasted for more than nine hours, ending in the early hours of Tuesday and garnering a total of 17.9 million kronor ($2.6 million).

All 337 objects, including Bergman’s wastebasket, writing desk and Golden Globe awards, were sold. A red-painted, devil-shaped jumping jack – given to Bergman by his grandson Ola – was auctioned for 29,000 kronor ($4,100).

A wooden model of Stockholm’s Royal Dramatic Theater with a tiny model of the legendary director sitting inside it, scored the highest bid: 1.03 million kronor ($147,500). Bergman headed the theater for several years in the mid-1960s.

Bergstrom called the auction “historic,” saying that even though the hammer prices were expected to be higher than estimates, they still exceeded expectations. “And because it’s him, Ingmar Bergman, it inflates the prices a bit, of course.”

The proceeds will go to Bergman’s family, Bergstrom said.

In the four days the objects were showcased before the auction, Bukowskis received more than 8,000 visitors. The auction house’s Web site tallied more than 5,000 hits a day from 116 countries, Bergstrom said.

According to the auction house, Bergman insisted in his will that his assets be auctioned off to prevent them from being caught up in “some kind of emotional hullabaloo.”

Bergman died July 30 at age 89 in his home on the Baltic Sea islet of Faro. His films won numerous international awards, including best foreign film Oscars for The Virgin Spring, Through a Glass Darkly and Fanny and Alexander.

His 84-acre (34-hectare) Faro property is also up for sale in a process managed by Christie’s Great Estates in London.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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