Kruse suing auction customers to collect debts

AUBURN, Ind. (AP) – Embattled auto auction house Kruse International is suing some of its customers to try to recoup millions of dollars as it faces legal pressure over its own debts.

Auburn-based Kruse has filed lawsuits in DeKalb County seeking more than $2 million. The auction house says it is owed $6.7 million by customers.

Kruse spokeswoman Kelley Ellert says the company plans to file five to 15 additional lawsuits over the next several weeks.

Kruse faces several lawsuits, including one by a Kansas bank alleging auctioneer Dean Kruse violated terms of a loan on which he still owes $6.5 million and another claiming Kruse defaulted on a $7.8 million debt.

The auctioneer told The Journal Gazette of Fort Wayne, Ind., in August that the recession has hurt his sales.

___

Information from: The Journal Gazette, http://www.journalgazette.net

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-01-03-10 1005EST

 

It looks like a train, but it's really an iron. A woman had to be strong to press clothes with this 10-pound rarity. Simmons & Co. auctioned the iron for $15,000 at the annual convention of the Pressing Iron and Trivet Collectors of America.

Kovels – Antiques & Collecting: Week of Jan. 4, 2010

It looks like a train, but it's really an iron. A woman had to be strong to press clothes with this 10-pound rarity. Simmons & Co. auctioned the iron for $15,000 at the annual convention of the Pressing Iron and Trivet Collectors of America.

It looks like a train, but it’s really an iron. A woman had to be strong to press clothes with this 10-pound rarity. Simmons & Co. auctioned the iron for $15,000 at the annual convention of the Pressing Iron and Trivet Collectors of America.

The old iron your great-grandmother used to iron her clothes with would not seem to be of much use or value today, but there are many collectors who want irons and other laundry-related collectibles. Prices are determined by age, condition, maker, rarity and appeal. It’s like a romance for these collectors – something about the iron seems unusual, entertaining and intriguing. So when a collector found an iron in Alabama about 10 years ago that looked like a locomotive with a handle, she knew it had to be hers. She was able to buy it for about $35. The 10-pound, 8 1/2-inch-long iron has most of its original black paint and gold trim. It was heated with burning alcohol. Research showed that the iron, marked with 1888 and 1889 patent dates and the name “E.B. Crosby,” was known; at least two other examples exist. The figural steam locomotive iron was auctioned at the annual convention of the Pressing Iron and Trivet Collectors of America. It brought $15,000. The new owner is taking it to Romania to put in a museum.

Q: I have a sugar and creamer marked “Lotus Ware.” They also have the letters “KTK” in a circle with a crown on top. Who made them? When?

A: Lotus Ware was made by Knowles, Taylor & Knowles Co. of East Liverpool, Ohio, from 1890 to 1900. The Belleek-like porcelain was sometimes decorated outside the factory. Lotus Ware sugar and creamer sets sell for $100 or more, depending on the quality of the decoration.

Q: Since 1964, I have had an old teacher’s desk and armless swivel chair that were removed from my grammar school before it was torn down. The desk is nondescript and unmarked, but the chair has a metal piece on the back that says “Heywood-Wakefield.” What can you tell me about the chair?

A: Heywood-Wakefield Co. was formed in 1921. Its immediate corporate predecessor was Heywood Brothers & Wakefield. So your chair doesn’t date earlier than the 1920s. Both Heywood-Wakefield and its predecessor manufactured school furniture, including children’s and teachers’ desks and chairs, starting in 1897. The earliest furniture was wooden. Later pieces were cast iron, steel or (in the 1950s) plastic.

Q: I came into a collection of World War II paperback books that are sexually explicit. Nothing is left to the imagination. I was told they were given to our servicemen overseas. Is there a market for something like this?

A: Sexually explicit literature, leaflets, posters and cartoons were used as propaganda by both sides during World War II. Germany and Japan air-dropped leaflets in an attempt to demoralize Allied troops, but the leaflets actually had the opposite effect. The pictures of scantily clad women often were used as pinups and were traded by the GIs. Erotica of all sorts sells, but there are laws about displaying sexually explicit items at shows. Ask a local antiquarian bookseller how to sell your books in your state.

Q: I have an April-June 1934 copy of a newspaper called the American Illustrated News. It’s filled solely with stories and photos about Hitler, applauding his leadership and reconstructive work in the “new Germany.” I haven’t been able to dig up any information about this newspaper. Any ideas?

A: We found some articles about the American Illustrated News in the archives of the New York Times. The issue you have may be the only one that ever made it to print. The 64-page broadsheet was dedicated to promoting Hitler and the achievements of the Nazi party to English-speaking readers in London and New York City. But Carl Bergmann of Berlin, the editor of the newspaper, was quoted as saying he regarded the newspaper “as a tourist promotion and not as a political venture.” He said that 50,000 copies were printed and that American readers would be charged 80 cents for a copy, which was expensive at the time.

Q: Are all Boehm figurines marked on the bottom? I recently inherited several porcelain figurines that were always referred to as “Boehm,” but they are not marked at all.

A: Edward Marshall Boehm (1913-1969) opened a porcelain studio in Trenton, N.J., in 1950. The studio is still there, although today it’s owned by a private group of investors. Boehm figurines are always marked. Some are signed with the company’s name either on the bottom or on the plinth. Others carry the company’s horse-head logo. And each piece is numbered, too. Some numbers and marks are stamped and may have worn off, but it’s highly unlikely that all the marks on all of your figurines would have worn off. Your figurines probably were not made by Boehm. Many companies copied Boehm’s style.

Correction: The skeleton rocking chair pictured with our Halloween column was correctly identified in the picture caption as a 20th-century copy of a 19th-century Russian chair. But the article confused the pictured chair with the original Russian chair that auctioned at Christie’s in 1992. The auction price Christie’s listed for the chair was $154,000.

Tip: Put your pearls on after you finish using hair spray or perfume. Both will discolor the pearls.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Need more information about collectibles? Find it at Kovels.com, our Web site for collectors. Check prices there, too. More than 700,000 are listed, and viewing them is free. You can also sign up to read our weekly Kovels Komments. It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is delivered by e-mail, free, if you register. Kovels.com offers extra collector’s information and lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and much more. You can subscribe to Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles, our monthly newsletter filled with prices, facts and color photos. Kovels.com adds to the information in our newspaper column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Silhouette, woman in ruffled dress seated on sofa and gazing in mirror, white reflection in mirror, circa 1920, Eva Schonberg, 9 3/4 x 12 1/2 inches, $30.
  • Stoneware pot, Harley’s English jam, dancing golliwog, Seedless Bramble label, circa 1920, 5 1/4 inches, $225.
  • New York Clipper newspaper almanac, color graphics of baseball, track, crew, circus scenes, sports statistics, 64 pages, 9 x 6 inches, $255.
  • Jim Dandy Cleanser powder can, character wearing black top hat and bow tie, red coat, holding can, image of trademark, metal top and bottom, dated 1911, 7 x 3 inches, $385.
  • Schwinn Apple Krate Sting-Ray bicycle, red with white lettering, 1970, 56 x 42 inches, $450.
  • Cloth doll, boy, stitched fingers, sepia features with blue accents, woolen two-piece suit, one leather shoe, circa. 1880, 12 inches, $695.
  • Stoneware churn, brushed cobalt floral swag, applied lunette handles, Beaver County, Pa., mid 1800s, 14 1/2 inches, $765.
  • Applique quilt, Rose of Sharon pattern, solid and print dress fabric, Pennsylvania, 1875, 92 square inches, $880.
  • Queen Anne-style chairs, curly maple, yoke crest rail over vase-shape splat, trapezoid rush seat, pad feet, circa 1900, 40 inches, set of six, $1,055.
  • Sandwich glass pomade jar, figural bear, milk glass, circa 1860, 5 1/4 inches, $1,250.

Just published. The new full-color Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2010, 42nd edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and 47,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You’ll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, and a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available at your bookstore; online at Kovels.com; by phone at 800-571-1555; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2009 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

The consignor purchased this secretary bookcase across the Ohio River from Cincinnati in 1988. It features an arched crown of carved fruit and flowers and a fitted interior with bird’s-eye maple trim. It stands 84 inches high and 40 inches wide. The estimate is $1,000-$1,200. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Cowan’s announces inaugural Décor auction, Jan. 8

The consignor purchased this secretary bookcase across the Ohio River from Cincinnati in 1988. It features an arched crown of carved fruit and flowers and a fitted interior with bird’s-eye maple trim. It stands 84 inches high and 40 inches wide. The estimate is $1,000-$1,200. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

The consignor purchased this secretary bookcase across the Ohio River from Cincinnati in 1988. It features an arched crown of carved fruit and flowers and a fitted interior with bird’s-eye maple trim. It stands 84 inches high and 40 inches wide. The estimate is $1,000-$1,200. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Fine and Decorative Art Department will hold its first Décor auction on Jan. 8 at Cowan’s saleroom. The inaugural sale will include a fine selection of paintings and prints, furniture spanning the 18th to the 20th centuries, ivories, carved and gilt frames, rugs, baskets, sterling, and early and Bohemian glass. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Bidders can participate in person or place absentee or phone bids.

Diane Wachs, director of Fine and Decorative Art, noted that “buyers for this auction are interested in great looking pieces within a good price range. This is a sale for everyone, from dealers to retail collectors, to people looking to furnish their house with great art.”

Highlights of the auction include several fine paintings by listed artists. An oil on panel by American artist Herbert Phillip Barnett (Ohio/Massachusetts 1910-1972) titled L’eglise St. Germain, is estimated to sell for $1,000-$1,500. The painting is signed and housed in wooden frame with papier-mâché around the interior. A label on the back notes Miller Gallery, Cincinnati, Ohio.

A selection of mid-century modern furniture and other decorative arts are featured. A Knoll Bertoia Diamond Chair, designed by sculptor Harry Bertoia in 1950 and later manufactured by Knoll Furniture, is offered with an estimate of $600-$800. A unique circa 1956 Sputnik star bust chandelier, with an estimate of $100-$200, is a rare but affordable find.

Victorian and early American furniture account for more than 100 lots in the auction. An English Queen Anne table, 1750-1770, will be offered. Made of walnut and oak, the swing-leg drop-leaf table features an oval top and demilune leaves, above a bowed and scalloped apron. The drop-leaf table is estimated to bring $800-$1,200. Also featured is a rosewood grain-painted Rococo Revival secretary bookcase, circa 1840-1850, which was found by the consignor in Covington, Ky., estimated to sell for $1,000-2,000.

Rounding out the auction are dozens of collections of fine porcelain, including a 32-piece Minton Rose luncheon service, from the mid- to late 20th century, decorated in polychrome floral swags and detailing. The service, which contains footed cream soup bowls, demitasse cups and saucers, and luncheon plates, is estimated at $800-$1,000.

The auction catalog is available online at www.cowans.com. For details phone 513-871-1670.

To view the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

Click here to view Cowan’s Auctions, Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


‘L'Eglise St. Germain’ by Herbert Phillip Barnett (American/Ohio/Massachusetts, 1910-1972) estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

‘L’Eglise St. Germain’ by Herbert Phillip Barnett (American/Ohio/Massachusetts, 1910-1972) estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.


Minton Rose luncheon service by Minton, 32 pieces, 20th century, includes nine footed cream soup bowls with saucers, eight demitasse cups and saucers, and 15 luncheon plates; all marked with Minton Laurel backstamp ‘Minton Rose/A.4807,’ estimate: $800-$1,000. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Minton Rose luncheon service by Minton, 32 pieces, 20th century, includes nine footed cream soup bowls with saucers, eight demitasse cups and saucers, and 15 luncheon plates; all marked with Minton Laurel backstamp ‘Minton Rose/A.4807,’ estimate: $800-$1,000. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.


Knoll Bertoia Diamond Chair, designed by Harry Bertoia, 1950, later manufactured by Knoll Furniture; in bent steel with Knoll replacement cushion; estimate: $600-$800. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Knoll Bertoia Diamond Chair, designed by Harry Bertoia, 1950, later manufactured by Knoll Furniture; in bent steel with Knoll replacement cushion; estimate: $600-$800. Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions Inc.


Sputnik star burst chandelier, polished brass; circa 1956; diameter 40 inches, 32 inches high; estimate: $100-$200.

Sputnik star burst chandelier, polished brass; circa 1956; diameter 40 inches, 32 inches high; estimate: $100-$200.

Tiffany Studios’ rare enameled copper bud vase is just 4 inches high. It is expected to bring $17,500-$22,500. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Rago: 20th Century Design sale Jan. 16-17 has items not seen in years

Tiffany Studios’ rare enameled copper bud vase is just 4 inches high. It is expected to bring $17,500-$22,500. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Tiffany Studios’ rare enameled copper bud vase is just 4 inches high. It is expected to bring $17,500-$22,500. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – Rago Arts and Auction Center begins 2010 with a weekend of top 20th century design featuring exceptional individual pieces, conservative estimates and property not seen on the market for a generation. The Early 20th Century Design sale, to begin Saturday, Jan. 16, at noon, will feature nearly 500 lots, including the property of Ned Chapman, Lee and Susan Mohn, the Heckscher Museum of Art, R.W. Apple Jr. and two private collections. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

David Rago calls it “our finest selection since the Sidney Sheldon Estate in 2008.”

Highlighting the American art pottery in the sale is, lot 1, a rare Louis Comfort Tiffany cabbage-shape vase, estimated at $19,000-$24,000. Among the best offerings from Rookwood are lot 16, and a 1903 Iris glaze vase with orchids by Carl Schmidt, estimated at $20,000-$30,000; lot 23, a 1901 Kataro Shirayamadani tall carved and painted Black Iris vase, estimated at $10,000-$15,000. Top Grueby includes lot 31, a floor vase estimated at $8,500-$12,500 and lot 249, a rare and large bulbous vase by Marie Seaman, estimated at $6,000-$9,000. First among the Newcomb College is lot 74, a tall vase with tulips, created by Maria DeHoa LeBlanc in 1909 and estimated at $12,000-$16,000. Two works by Frederick H. Rhead stand out: lot 441, a rare Rhead Faience umbrella stand made for Weller, estimated at $4,000-$6,000 and lot 274, a Rhead Pottery enamel-decorated and inlaid vase, estimated at $3,000-$4,000. Also of note: lot 12, a rare vase with modeled snake by Theophilus A. Brouwer for Middlelane, estimated at $5,000-$7,500; a large Persian urn from Jugtown, lot 268, estimated at $7,500-$10,000; an early Van Briggle vase embossed with heart-shaped leaves, lot 92, estimated at $3,000-$5,000; a W.J. Walley squat vessel, lot 353, estimated at $2,500-$3,500; a large ovoid ribbed Teco vase, lot 361, estimated at $3,500-$4,500; and a fine George Ohr coffeepot, lot 6, with sponged glaze, estimated at $5,000-$7,000.

The sale includes a fine selection of European decorative arts, including a private collection of more than 50 pieces of Amphora pottery, as well as Lalique glass, Moorcroft pottery and Art Nouveau furniture. Highlights here include lot 179, a Lalique Poissons vase in deep red glass cased in yellow, circa 1921, estimated at $17,000-$22,000; lot 166, an Art Nouveau carved maple and burlwood china cabinet, estimated at $10,000-$15,000; lot 167, a Louis Majorelle carved mahogany and bird’s-eye maple occasional table, estimated at $9,000-$14,000; lot 180, a Rain vase by Daum, estimated at $3,500-$4,500; and lot 206, “Daphne,” an Ernst Wahliss Amphora ceramic bust, estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

Metalware from the best European and American makers is here, from lot 178, a rare Tiffany enameled copper cabinet vase embossed with mushrooms, estimated at $17,500-$22,500, to lot 225, a silver-plated presentation platter by Joseph Hoffman for Wiener Werkstätte, estimated at $3,250-$4,250. Also look for a Gustav Stickley hammered copper charger with pods, estimated at $12,000-$16,000.

The lighting in the sale features a number of lamps by Dirk Van Erp, including lot 288, a hammered copper and mica four-panel table lamp, estimated at $8,000-$12,000; lot 172, a Tiffany Studios Colonial table lamp with blown-out bronze base, estimated at $18,000-$22,000; and lot 171, a Tiffany Studios table lamp with Daffodil shade over Secessionist bronze base, estimated at $35,000-$45,000.

As a whole, the 91 pieces of Arts & Crafts furniture we are offering represents the strongest level of high-quality furnishings we have presented in many sales, said Rago.

Several exceptional Rohlfs items will be offered: lot 147, a large 1903 blanket chest with carvings and ornate copper work, estimated at $14,000-$22,000; lot 145, an extensively carved music cabinet, estimated at $7,000-$10,000; and lot 146, an octagonal table with a repeating pattern of elaborate cutout panels, estimated at $10,000-$15,000.

An important Tiffany chair, lot 169, from the New York Havemeyer residence, designed in conjunction with Samuel Coleman, will be offered for $100,000-$125,000.

Early and rare Gustav Stickley pieces include lot 57, a 1902 office desk with paneled sides and a 10-drawer gallery top in exceptional original finish, estimated at $11,000-$14,000; lot 58, a 1901 miter-mullion tall single-door china cabinet, estimated at $8,000-$12,000; lot 54, a Grueby tile-top plant stand from 1901, estimated at $7,000-$10,000; and lot 235, a custom-made leather-top desk from 1901 estimated at $8,000-$12,000. A beautiful Roycroft Ali Baba bench, lot 156, is estimated at $10,000-$12,000.

The Modern Design sale on Sunday, Jan. 17, will feature almost 500 lots in an array from Art Deco to classic mid-century to contemporary, with standout work by Tommi Parzinger, John Lewis, Clement Rousseau, Wharton Esherick, Paul Evans, Robert Arneson, Josef Hoffman and perhaps the most exceptional lot of the sale, a pair of museum-quality wrought-iron gates with antelopes by W. Hunt Diederich, mounted on contemporary stands, circa 1920.

Furniture comprises the largest portion of the sale and includes work from most of the leading designers working from the ’40s through the ’60s in the United States and abroad. Among the Scandinavian/Northern European offers are lot 737, a Poul Kjaerholm PK-80 daybed estimated at $8,000-$12,000; lot 747, a Hans Wegner credenza, estimated at $7,000-$9,000; lot 733, a Hans Wegner Papa Bear chair and matching ottoman, estimated at $5,000-$7,000; and lot 750, a set of six Finn Juhl/Niels Vodder dining chairs estimated at $5,000-$7,000.

The sale includes a choice selection of Tommi Parzinger design, including lot 500, a rare mahogany inlaid dining table; lot 508, a massive elm and mahogany credenza; and lot 504, a lacquered oak credenza on mahogany legs with milk-glass panels, each estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

Karl Springer, known for simple shapes in exotic materials, is well-represented here by lot 974, a freeform polished stainless steel coffee table on adjustable feet, estimated at $8,000-12,000.

James Mont’s over-the-top showmanship is on display in more than 30 lots of furniture and more of lighting. Among the furniture highlights: lot 527, a pair of oversize cabinets/tables of antiqued mirror, estimated at $2,500-$3,500; lot 931, a polychrome bar cabinet, estimated at $2,000-$3,000; lot 526, a rare grandfather clock in polychrome finish, estimated at $3,500-$5,500; and lot 926, a large, lighted cabinet with an Asian motif in polychrome and gilt, estimated at $3,500-$5,000. Those whose taste in Modern design is a bit more restrained will find much to admire as well. There are elegant furnishings by Edward Wormley for Dunbar and T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings for Widdicomb.Iconic mid-century works include CSS units and Thin-Edge chests by George Nelson for Herman Miller; dining table and chairs by Warren McArthur; folding screens and a rosewood and leather lounge chair with ottoman from Charles and Ray Eames; Vladimir Kagan’s Cloud sofa and an Isamu Noguchi side table.

Rago’s is known for selling great studio furniture. This auction includes the work of Wharton Esherick, Paul Evans, Phil Powell and George Nakashima, highlighted by lot 601, a three-piece corner office from Wharton Esherick with storage unit, desk and shelves, estimated at $10,000-$15,000; lot 542, a rare Paul Evans Deep Relief patinated steel credenza, estimated at $20,000-$30,000; 547, lot 613, a George Nakashima Frenchman’s Cove II walnut dining table with two leaves, estimated at $15,000-$25,000; lot 618, a George Nakashima Minguren coffee table with occlusions and rosewood butterfly, estimated at $18,000-24,000; lot 605, a set of six Nakashima walnut Conoid dining chairs with hickory spindles, estimated at $24,000-$34,000; and lot 554, a Phil Powell dining table with walnut top on iron base, estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

John Lewis is a remarkable contemporary designer of furniture and sculpture in glass. The sale includes five of his tables, highlighted by lot 685, a clear square console table with a black glass base, 1997, estimated at $10,000-$15,000, and lot 688, a copper center table with a clear, sandblasted cast glass base, estimated at $12,000-$18,000.

The lighting in the sale is notable for lot 719, a rare Clément Rousseau table lamp from 1948, made of exotic wood, ivory and shagreen, estimated at $12,000-$15,000; lot 505, an enameled iron seven-light wall sconce with original clip-on silk shades by Tommi Parzinger, estimated $4,000-6,000; lot 545, three chrome and brass uplight floor lamps by Paul Evans, estimated at $3,000-$5,000; and lot 699, a Jacques Adnet floor lamp with tripod base and leather column, estimated at $3,000-$4,000.

Robert Arneson’s porcelain trophy bust (lot 665) of the artist from 1981, estimated at $11,000-$14,000, is one of the stars of the Modern ceramics.

Rago’s also has its usual fine selection of Claude Conover, including lot 644, a glazed ceramic garden stool estimated at $5,000-$7,000.

There is great variety in the Modern glass portion of the sale, with contemporary work by John Lewis, here with lot 684, a sculpture estimated at $4,500-$6,500; an internally decorated cased glass vase by Joel Phillip Myers, estimated at $2,750-$3,750; lot 835, and a Fratelli Toso Cattedrale glass vase with square murrines, estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

Jewelry includes lot 588, a gold necklace by George Rickey, estimated at $12,000-$16,000; and lot 593, a copper and glass bead necklace from Albert Paley, estimated at $6,000-$8,000.

Previews will be Saturday, Jan. 9 through Jan. 15, from noon to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Doors open at 9 a.m. on the mornings of the sales.

For details contact Rago 609-397-9374.

To view the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Rago Arts and Auction Center’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Lalique’s Poissons deep red glass vase dates to the early 1920s. It is 9 1/2 inches high and 9 1/2 inches in diameter. It has a $17,000-22,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Lalique’s Poissons deep red glass vase dates to the early 1920s. It is 9 1/2 inches high and 9 1/2 inches in diameter. It has a $17,000-22,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.


The Dirk Van Erp hammered copper table lamp stands 20 1/2 inches tall. The shade is 16 3/4 inches in diameter. It has an $8,000-12,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

The Dirk Van Erp hammered copper table lamp stands 20 1/2 inches tall. The shade is 16 3/4 inches in diameter. It has an $8,000-12,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.


Charles Rohlfs’ mark, an ‘R’ carved within a bow saw, is on the back of this exceptional music cabinet. It measures 20 inches high, 36 inches long and 11 1/2 inches deep. It has a $7,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Charles Rohlfs’ mark, an ‘R’ carved within a bow saw, is on the back of this exceptional music cabinet. It measures 20 inches high, 36 inches long and 11 1/2 inches deep. It has a $7,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.


Considered rare, this Tommi Parzinger mahogany dining table is inlaid with finely grained wooden tiles and pale-stained wood diamonds. Complete with two matching latch-on leaves, in original rack, it is 29 inches high, 84 inches long and 42 inches wide. It has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Attributed to Eliphalet Chapin is this Connecticut River Valley cherry birdcage tilt top tea table with molded edge. It is 29 inches high by 26 inches in diameter. The estimate is $6,000.00-$10,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

Whites’ long-standing Shaker collection to sell at Jenack’s, Jan. 9-10

Attributed to Eliphalet Chapin is this Connecticut River Valley cherry birdcage tilt top tea table with molded edge. It is 29 inches high by 26 inches in diameter. The estimate is $6,000.00-$10,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

Attributed to Eliphalet Chapin is this Connecticut River Valley cherry birdcage tilt top tea table with molded edge. It is 29 inches high by 26 inches in diameter. The estimate is $6,000.00-$10,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

CHESTER, N.Y. – William Jenack Auctioneers will begin 2010 with an important Americana and Shaker auction. A 50-year private collection of Americana and Shaker furnishings amassed by Byron and Ruth White headlines the two-day sale at the William Jenack gallery on Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 9 and 10, commencing both days at 11 a.m. Eastern. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Byron and Ruth White have been involved in the auction world for over 50 years as auctioneer, collectors and dealers. They are known for their dealings in important pieces of Shaker, New England and Pennsylvania furniture and accessories. This auction will showcase their exceptional collection with many of the items retaining original details and paint. The focus of this collection is on quality, originality and freshness to the market.

Americana highlights include a Connecticut River Valley cherry birdcage tilt-top tea table attributed to Eliphalet Chapin; a rare American wrought iron and brass wedding étagère; a Connecticut River Valley cherry candlestand with wood screw attached top; a Connecticut River Valley Chippendale cherry chest of drawers; Delaware River Valley Chippendale carved cherry fall-front desk, branded multiple times “T. Phillip;” a Hudson River Valley (Anna Odell, Newburgh, N.Y.) kas with raised panel doors; a New England Windsor painted side chair; a Massachusetts Chippendale carved mahogany drop-leaf table; a Pennsylvania pine cupboard in old red wash; and a Pennsylvania painted pine bucket bench with original paint.

Prominently featured in the sale is one of the largest groups of Shaker items to appear at auction recently. Standouts include a tiger-maple and cherry stand-up store desk secretary; butternut painted one-piece, step-back cupboard; a set of four Union Village, Ohio, tiger maple ladder-back side chairs; painted pine six-board blanket box in old red paint; spider-leg maple and cherry candlestand; a hanging cabinet with double paneled door with red wash, possibly Harvard Community; a painted pine sewing cabinet; and a pine hanging seed saver 10-drawer cabinet.

Americana accessories will round out the sale featuring a Chippendale carved cherry tall case clock with a painted dial; an American Chippendale carved mirror with phoenix crest; a Shaker carved maple knitty knotty; a folk art carved and painted rooster and chicken; a Shaker turned burl mortar and pestle; vintage baskets including Shaker; a collection 15-plus candle molds including W. Humston/Troy, N.Y. 24-candle with pine mount and pewter molds; an American School ink/watercolor theorem on paper “Psalms;” a fine American hooked floral rug dated 1897; a collection blue-slip decorated crocks; a collection of cast-iron doorstops including Hubley; and a large collection of Shaker and Americana accessories.

The auction will offer approximately 50 lots of American and European works of art including Henry Hobart Nichols, Bruno del Favero, Harry Bright, attributed Bennett Bradbury, Rod Palmer, G. Drummond Munsfield, August Albo, George Parsons, Hettie Hoyt, Antony Lamor, John Hayes, Whitney Ford Hoyt, Howard Terpning, after Gilbert Stuart, after James Pollard, Luigi Lucioni, Grant Miles Simon and Margery Austin Ryerson.

The William J. Jenack Auction Gallery is located at 62 Kings Highway Bypass in Chester. Previews are scheduled for Jan. 5-8, noon to 5 p.m.; and Jan. 9-10, 9 -10:45 a.m. prior to sale.

For information, visit www.jenack.com or call 845-469-9095.

View a fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

 

Click here to view William J. Jenack Auctioneers’ complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This 19th-century step-back cupboard is a Shaker piece. It is painted butternut, 84 inches high by 43 inches wide. The estimate is $6,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

This 19th-century step-back cupboard is a Shaker piece. It is painted butternut, 84 inches high by 43 inches wide. The estimate is $6,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

Made of wrought iron and brass, this American wedding étagère is 72 inches high. The rare 19th-century stand has a $5,000-$7,000 estimate. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

Made of wrought iron and brass, this American wedding étagère is 72 inches high. The rare 19th-century stand has a $5,000-$7,000 estimate. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

This painted tiger-maple store desk-secretary is also attributed to the Shakers. It is 86 inches high by 54 inches wide. It has a $7,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

This painted tiger-maple store desk-secretary is also attributed to the Shakers. It is 86 inches high by 54 inches wide. It has a $7,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

Original cast-iron pulls enhance this Shaker painted pine sewing cabinet with dovetailed construction. It measures 27 1/2 inches tall. The estimate is $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.

Original cast-iron pulls enhance this Shaker painted pine sewing cabinet with dovetailed construction. It measures 27 1/2 inches tall. The estimate is $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of William J. Jenack Auction Gallery.