‘Weasaw Shosone’ is incised on the bottom of this 8 1/2-inch Rookwood portrait vase decorated by Grace Young in 1901. Expected to sell for $5,000-$7,000, the Standard Glaze vase topped $10,575. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Well-known institutions contribute to Cowan’s sale Feb. 20

‘Weasaw Shosone’ is incised on the bottom of this 8 1/2-inch Rookwood portrait vase decorated by Grace Young in 1901. The vase is expected to sell for $5,000-$7,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

‘Weasaw Shosone’ is incised on the bottom of this 8 1/2-inch Rookwood portrait vase decorated by Grace Young in 1901. The vase is expected to sell for $5,000-$7,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

CINCINNATI – A Tiffany Studios turtleback chandelier will be featured in Cowan’s Feb. 20 Fine and Decorative Art Auction. The 461-lot sale features consignments from the estate of Catherine J. Wiebold of Cincinnati, Ohio, the estate of T.V. and Anne Ponder of Louisville, Ky., Stewart S. Maxwell of Cincinnati, the Dayton Art Institute, Western Reserve Historical Society, the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis and others. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

The four-light chandelier, estimated to sell for $25,000-$35,000, is marked “Tiffany Studios, New York” and features green geometric leaded glass panels with a wide band of iridescent turtleback tiles.

Later 20th-century decorative and fine art are also highlighted. A circa 1970 galvanized steel console table by John Dickinson (American, 1920-1982), in the form of a draped table with cloth folds and a one inch brass band on the skirt’s edge, is estimated to bring $25,000-$35,000. Dickinson is considered to be one of the most innovative and original American designers of the 20th century, working predominantly with the neutral color palette of plaster, tin and steel. This table is an example of work made by Dickinson at the pinnacle of his career.

Cowan’s will offer a collection of paintings by American artist Joseph Marioni (b. 1943). A Cincinnati native, Marioni has been a force in monochromatic painting since the 1970s, when the offered paintings were executed. Purchased directly from the artist, the three works, one red, one yellow and one pink and orange, range in size from 68 1/2 inches by 47 3/4 inches to 54 1/2 inches by 84 1/2 inches and are estimated to bring upwards of $15,000 each.

A circa 1920 Indian Scout motorcycle, manufactured by Indian Motorcycle Co. of Springfield, Mass., is estimated to sell for $15,000-$20,000. An icon of American design, the Scout, with two-cylinder, 55-horsepower, 596cc (37ci) engine, was a popular motorcycle built from 1920 to 1949. It rivaled the earlier Chief as Indian’s most important model. The Scout was an immediate hit with dirt track and endurance racers and street riders and became even more popular after the frame was lowered and the engine bumped to 45ci in 1928.

Other fine art offered in the auction will include a winter landscape by Roy Cleveland Nuse (American, 1885-1975) titled Winter Morning, estimated to sell for $10,000-$15,000. Signed and dated “37,” the painting was discovered in Northeastern Ohio and has remained in a private collection until its inclusion in this auction. A hunting scene by William McKendree Snyder (American/Indiana, 1848-1930) is also featured and carries an estimate of $10,000-$15,000. A native Hoosier, Snyder painted predominantly landscape portraits in the style of the Hudson River School. This is a rare example of a hunting scene for Snyder as opposed to his more consistent subject matter of forest landscapes.

Two strong Rookwood pieces are leading lots in the auction. A 1937 Rookwood vellum plaque by Fred Rothenbusch, depicting a winter mountain landscape with snow-capped mountains, tall firs and reflecting water, and in an Arts and Crafts oak frame, is estimated to bring $8,000-$12,000. Additionally, a 1901 Standard Glaze vase by Grace Young featuring a portrait of Hopi Indian “Weasaw Shoshone,” executed by Grace Young in 1901, carries an estimate of $5,000-$7,000.

A folk portrait of abolitionist John Brown, by African American artist Edwin Garnet Riley, is estimated to sell for $4,000-$6,000. The lot includes a group of materials related to the artist, including his self-published book A Tribute to John Brown. A native of Pittsburgh, Riley was an author, poet and painter whose articles were published regularly in the Pittsburgh Press.

Southern items will likely inspire spirited bidding. A pair of double portraits attributed to Dupue, identified as the couples Ragland and Couchman of Clark County, Ky., related by the marriage of their children, are estimated to bring $10,000-$15,000 each. Dupue, a French artist, is believed to be the so-called Guilford Limner of Guilford County, N.C. Sitters are depicted with large eyes and in various kinds of turned or fancy chairs. Men often have their knees crossed; the women are often holding handkerchiefs, books or engaged in knitting or sewing.

Furniture highlights include a Federal sideboard-secretary of figured mahogany, circa 1790-1810, likely Mid-Atlantic or Southern, estimated at $1,500-$2,550, and a Southern poplar paneled sugar chest estimated at $1,500-$2,500.

A pair of aluminum space age table lamps manufactured in the mid-1930s by Pattyn Products, Detroit, has a $6,000-$8,000 estimate. The lamps are accented with bands of brass and Bakelite.

For details call 513-871-1670.

To view the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com

Click here to view Cowan’s Auctions, Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Marked ‘Tiffany Studios, New York,’ this four-light chandelier with green geometric leaded glass panels and a wide band of turtleback tiles has fiery iridescence. It carries a $25,000-$35,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Marked ‘Tiffany Studios, New York,’ this four-light chandelier with green geometric leaded glass panels and a wide band of turtleback tiles has fiery iridescence. It carries a $25,000-$35,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.


John Dickinson (American, 1920-1982) designed his galvanized steel table in the 1970s. The metalwork resembles cloth folds with a 1-inch brass band on the skirt's edge. A brass plaque with artist's signature and Roman numerals XLII is found on the skirt. It has a $25,000-$35,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

John Dickinson (American, 1920-1982) designed his galvanized steel table in the 1970s. The metalwork resembles cloth folds with a 1-inch brass band on the skirt’s edge. A brass plaque with artist’s signature and Roman numerals XLII is found on the skirt. It has a $25,000-$35,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.


The low serial number, 55R72, on this Indian Scout motorcycle dates it to the first year of production, 1920. Fresh from a Lexington, Ky., estate, the bike has a $15,000-$20,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

The low serial number, 55R72, on this Indian Scout motorcycle dates it to the first year of production, 1920. Fresh from a Lexington, Ky., estate, the bike has a $15,000-$20,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.


A nice Arts and Crafts oak frame holds this 10- by 12-inch Rookwood vellum plaque by Fred Rothenbusch. The impressed flame logo indicates the plaque was made in 1937. It remains uncrazed and has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

A nice Arts and Crafts oak frame holds this 10- by 12-inch Rookwood vellum plaque by Fred Rothenbusch. The impressed flame logo indicates the plaque was made in 1937. It remains uncrazed and has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Virginia City, Nev., became a boomtown with the discovery of the Comstock Lode silver strike of 1859. This view of the town was taken about eight years later. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Ansel Adams’ daughter donates Nevada historic photos

Virginia City, Nev., became a boomtown with the discovery of the Comstock Lode silver strike of 1859. This view of the town was taken about eight years later. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Virginia City, Nev., became a boomtown with the discovery of the Comstock Lode silver strike of 1859. This view of the town was taken about eight years later. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

RENO, Nev. (AP) – The daughter of Ansel Adams is helping to shed some new light on Nevada with the help of photographs shot long before her father’s renowned images of the American West.

Anne Adams Helms has donated about two dozen photos to the Nevada Historical Society in Reno. The images were taken as early as the 1860s by photographers who predated her father.

The collection includes fading carte-de-visite photos – small albumen prints mounted on cards – of Mark Twain acquaintance Robert Howland, Nevada Territorial Gov. James Nye, the old Wells Fargo office in Virginia City and the former U.S. Mint in Carson City.

Helms, 74, of Salinas, Calif., said the photos were handed down by Olive Bray, who was Ansel Adams’ mother. Bray, who was raised in Carson City, married Charles Adams there in 1896 before the couple settled in San Francisco.

While the collection and most of the photos that make it up are small in size, historians are hailing them as historically significant. “We’re lucky. These kinds of photos don’t surface that much anymore,” said Guy Rocha, retired Nevada state archivist. “It gives us a better idea of what people and places looked like back then.”

The collection includes original photographs and copies of originals. Images capture famous Nevadans as well as scenes from one of the world’s greatest bonanzas: a massive, underground pocket of silver and gold known as the Comstock Lode in Virginia City, about 20 miles southeast of Reno.

Among other things, Helms’ donation gives the Historical Society its lone original photo of the Wells Fargo office in Virginia City and its only photo of Howland as a young man, said Lee Brumbaugh, the society’s photo curator.

It also provides the museum with its only photograph of early Carson City photographer Frank Ludlow and a copy of Timothy O’Sullivan’s famous 1863 photo of the Gould and Curry Mill in Virginia City.

“It’s one of those times when photography clearly allows insight into history and becomes a subject of unlimited research,” said Brumbaugh, who considers the Howland photo as one of the most significant of the collection.

As a young man, Howland shared a cabin with Twain in Aurora, Nev., in 1862. Unlike Twain, he succeeded in mining and became superintendent at several mines and then a co-owner in at least two enterprises. He also was the first warden of the territorial prison in Carson City.

Robert Stewart, author of Aurora: Nevada’s Ghost City of the Dawn, said he’s aware of at least two other early photos of Howland but the one donated by Helms is unique. It shows Howland posing while dressed in Western attire and holding a hat.

“I think it reveals something about his personality,” Stewart said. “It shows a man who came west (from New York) and became a Westerner. He’s comfortable in his Western attire and looks like a man who would be uncomfortable in an Eastern suit.”

Twain, in a letter at the time, wrote that Howland “has such a jolly long tongue and keeps it wagging so comfortably” that it was difficult to ask him a question.

Twain went on to become a reporter for the Territorial Enterprise in Virginia City during a nearly three-year stay in Nevada that ended in 1864.

The Historical Society plans put enlargements of the photos, along with the story of their ties to the Adams family, on public display beginning in August. The fading originals cannot be safely displayed because of their age, Brumbaugh said.

Helms also donated about three dozen bills, receipts and other items dating to the 1890s from the Charles E. Bray Co., a Carson City livery stable owned by Ansel Adams’ maternal grandfather.

Helms thinks Ansel Adams’ parents might have met while his father worked in the 1890s on a mine near Wellington, about 65 miles south of Reno.

His mother, Olive Bray, was born in Iowa and was 2-years-old when her family moved to Carson City in 1864. She graduated from high school there.

While Helms is “very interested” in her own family history, she didn’t find a need for the Nevada photos, she said.

“I wanted to get them in the hands of an organization that would care about them,” Helms said. “I’m delighted that the historical society has them and can use them.”

She and Dr. Michael Adams of Fresno, Calif., are the only children of Ansel Adams, one of the nation’s most famous photographers.

Adams is best known for his black-and-white photographs of the American West, mainly images of the landscape, especially in Yosemite National Park. He died in 1984 at 82.

___

On the Net: Nevada Historical Society: http://nevadaculture.org

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-WS-02-06-10 1200EST

Portrait of Andrew Jackson, painted 1836 by William Stewart Watson and given by the president to an Alabama supporter, sold for $36,320. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

Gen. Andrew Jackson triumphs at Case’s Winter Auction

Portrait of Andrew Jackson, painted 1836 by William Stewart Watson and given by the president to an Alabama supporter, sold for $36,320. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

Portrait of Andrew Jackson, painted 1836 by William Stewart Watson and given by the president to an Alabama supporter, sold for $36,320. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— In a surprise finish, a portrait of General-turned-President Andrew Jackson won top lot status at the Winter Case Antiques auction on Jan. 23 – a sale punctuated by several other bright spots as well.

“In terms of sales results, this was our best auction in almost two years,” said company president John Case. “We saw heavy online and phone bidding, and a full gallery with a lot of new faces.”

Portraits of Jackson painted during his lifetime (1767-1845) are fairly scarce. This one, 34 inches by 31 inches framed, was painted during his presidency in 1836 by William Stewart Watson (Scottish, 1800-1870). According to the family in which it descended, the portrait was given to Alabama Col. Albert James Pickett when Pickett visited Jackson at his home, the Hermitage, in 1837. Pickett had been instrumental in organizing a counter response to a group of Alabama anti-Jackson states rights legislators, and the portrait was a reward for his loyalty. Estimated at $7,500 to $8,500, it generated a drawn-out battle between a man in the gallery and a phone bidder from the Southwest, and eventually hammered down to the phone at $36,320. (Prices include the buyer’s premium.)

A painting of ice skaters in Central Park by African American artist Joseph Delaney (1904-1991), drew action on multiple phone lines and sold to a South Carolina bidder. It reached the top of its estimate, $28,375, tying a hammer price record set for the artist in 2007.

Delaney, a Knoxville native, left in the 1930s for New York, where his brother Beauford was also working as an artist, and enrolled in the Art Students League under the tutelage of Thomas Hart Benton and Alexander Brooke. His work is the subject of the 2009 book, The Life, Art and Times of Joseph Delaney, 1904-1991 by Frederick C. Moffatt. The painting is illustrated in the book.

“While most of Delaney’s subject matter is tied to New York, the interest generated by this piece tells us there is a very strong market for his work here in the South,” said Case. “We hope to see more of his paintings here in the future.”

Other art highlights included a landscape with trees and luminescent sky by Adolf Robert Shulz (Indiana, 1869-1963) which realized $6,129 (est. $3500-$4,500), a 20th-century Mississippi homestead scene by self-taught Southern artist Rhoda Brady Stokes, $3,859, and an early 20th- century still life by Tennessee artist Cornelius Hankins, $1,702. La Danse a la Campagne, a Pierre August Renoir soft ground etching, sold amid heavy competition at $9,988 despite some condition issues including a faint stain and trimmed edges, and a 19th-century miniature painting on ivory signed “Vernet,” depicting Christopher Columbus at the court of Ferdinand and Isabella, brought $4,313.

An Edgefield, S.C., stoneware butter crock with slip swag decoration topped the offerings of Southern pottery, always a staple at Case. It achieved $18,160 (est. $3,500-$4,500). The 9-inch- tall piece retained its original lid, and Case said it was especially desirable because both the base and lid were marked “Chandler Maker.” Thomas Chandler, who has been called Edgefield’s premier potter, was born in Virginia but enlisted in the Army in Albany, N.Y., in 1832, so may have potted briefly in New York. A decorated jar made by him bears a decided resemblance to New York wide-mouth jar forms with lug handles. His straight-sided cake crocks are also reminiscent of Northern cobalt decorated crocks. In 1838, Chandler married into the Durham family of potters in Edgefield. He is believed to have turned wares at all of the Edgefield factories where slip decoration was widely used. Chandler died in North Carolina in 1854.

Another Edgefield piece, an ovoid form jug decorated on both sides with a “broken flower stem” slip design, also possibly by Chandler, brought just over its high estimate at $2,610. An East Tennessee decorated stoneware 2-gallon jar attributed to Charles Decker earned $2,156 (est. $900-$1,200), and an 8-gallon Wythe County, Va., stoneware jug with sine wave decoration and ribbed rim brought $851. A miniature Middle Tennessee jug sold for $225.

The sale featured a large amount of American and English 19th- and 20th-century silver hollowware and flatware, with most of the sterling bringing consistently good prices. The category was crowned by a coin silver calling card case bearing the mark of David Hope, only the second coin silver card case known with a Tennessee maker’s mark. It competed to $2,838, double its high estimate. A lot of six coin silver teaspoons, four marked by Samuel Bell of Knoxville, brought $1,589 (est. $400-$500), and an 1860 English sterling fish set with ivory handles carved in the form of mermaids, inscribed to Simon Cameron, Abraham Lincoln’s secretary of war, served up $1,816.

Furniture as a category remained somewhat soft, with a few exceptions. A Middle Tennessee cherry book or china press with glazed doors and some height loss to its feet earned $9,534 (est. $4500-$5,500), while a sideboard which descended in the same family, with similar design and construction but more significant foot losses, brought $1,589. A miniature grain painted Wythe County, Va., blanket chest with bracket feet closed at $1,135.

Textiles and Folk Art highlights included a Connecticut alphabet sampler with floral border dated 1845 and signed Chloe Jane Blakeslee, $1,021 (est. $400-$600), and a Middle Tennessee quilt in the Rose of Sharon or Whig Rose variant pattern, $908. A folk art painted watch hutch with grain paint and later stenciled chickens on top flew to $1,078, while an elaborately pieced picture frame with heart and hand designs made $567, the same price as a Southern dulcimer in wooden case with old bow.

Other standouts included a 1904 Confederate Cavalry veterans photos of Troop A from Nashville, Tenn., picturing two African American porters, $2,043 (est. $600-$800), and a Handel Arts and Crafts table lamp with bronze base and a possibly later leaded floral glass shade, $1,816.

An Aesthetic movement faience jardinière with bronzed feet cast in the form of elephant heads brought $1,248, and a set of Aunt Louisa’s Little Pets Alphabet blocks by McLoughlin Brothers spelled out a top bid of $567.

“We were very encouraged by the results of this sale, especially the fact that we experienced a record number of online bidders through LiveAuctioneers,” said Case. “Whether it’s the economy finally showing signs of recovery, or a result of our most aggressive advertising to date, we feel very grateful.”

Case is currently accepting consignments for its Spring auction, scheduled for May 22 in Knoxville. The company conducts sales in its gallery in the historic Cherokee Mills building in Knoxville and also operates a branch office in Nashville.

For details call 865-558-3033 or visit Case’s website: www.caseantiques.com

Click here to view Case Antiques, Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Both the lid and body of this rare Edgefield, S.C., butter crock were decorated and marked “Chandler Maker.” It sold  for $18,160. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

Both the lid and body of this rare Edgefield, S.C., butter crock were decorated and marked “Chandler Maker.” It sold for $18,160. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.


‘Central Park Skating,’ an oil on masonite painting by Joseph Delaney (New York/Tennessee, 1904-1991), 29 inches by 31 inches, sold for $28,375. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

‘Central Park Skating,’ an oil on masonite painting by Joseph Delaney (New York/Tennessee, 1904-1991), 29 inches by 31 inches, sold for $28,375. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.


Marks on this coin silver card case identify it as the work of Tennessee silversmith David Hope. The case sold for $2,838. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

Marks on this coin silver card case identify it as the work of Tennessee silversmith David Hope. The case sold for $2,838. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.


This Middle Tennessee cherry book or china press, 90 1/2 inches by 46 3/4 inches by 19 1/4 inches, sold for $9,534. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

This Middle Tennessee cherry book or china press, 90 1/2 inches by 46 3/4 inches by 19 1/4 inches, sold for $9,534. Image courtesy of Case Auctions.

Antiques Roadshow Behind the Scenes by Marsha Bemko, Touchstone Books (Simon & Schuster)

Books in Review: Antiques Roadshow Behind the Scenes

Antiques Roadshow Behind the Scenes by Marsha Bemko, Touchstone Books (Simon & Schuster)

Antiques Roadshow Behind the Scenes by Marsha Bemko, Touchstone Books (Simon & Schuster)

NEW YORK (ACNI) – Ever wondered what goes on at an Antiques Roadshow shoot after the cameras stop rolling? Marsha Bemko, executive producer of PBS Television’s No. 1 weekly show, could tell you all about it – and she does, in the newly published soft-cover book titled Antiques Roadshow Behind the Scenes.

Because you’ve taken the time to read this review, it’s safe to say you like antiques. In that case, you’ll find Bemko’s book to be an addictive read. It’s unlike any other antiques-related book you’ll ever come across, if for no other reason because of the author’s privileged and unique perspective. It’s not a price guide, nor is it a long, dreary narrative about things Mom threw out when the writer went off to college. Each chapter is an insider’s view of America’s favorite collector show, peppered with entertaining sidebars and short bursts of colorful commentary. It’s as much about people as it is things.

Marsha relates with obvious relish those tales of the unexpected that occur on the Antiques Roadshow trail – not just the rare and bizarre objects that are depicted and back-storied so skillfully in this book, but also the events, like the time the owner of a lakefront mansion in Hot Springs, Arkansas invited the entire staff, crew and appraisers to her lavish home. “They really rolled out the red carpet. There were fireworks, boat rides, Jet Skis and a private chef,” Bemko quotes associate producer Jill Giles.

And what about those end-of-season wrap parties? Oh, those madcap Roadshow experts – as Season 6 drew to a close in the summer of 2001, some of the appraisers decided to produce a skit that roasted various staff members, including Bemko. One of the show’s most popular appraisers, Noel Barrett (of Noel Barrett Antiques & Auctions in Carversville, Pa.), let down his long, usually pony-tailed hair and donned a beige miniskirt similar to those Bemko was known to wear at the time and spoofed the Roadshow boss. “What unfolded was very funny, but I was so embarrassed I couldn’t watch,” Bemko recalls in the book. The skit went on to include a representation of the actual Holy Grail brought in for appraisal at a mock Roadshow event. The object was dismissed after failing to meet “Bemko’s” stringent standards for on-air presentation.

Bemko delivers the goods with this fresh and insightful memoir that intuitively answers the questions we all wonder about – how do the producers pick the Roadshow cities? What are the most valuable items discovered on Roadshow, and where are they now? What types of items are most likely to be selected for on-air appraisal, and how can I maximize my chances of being chosen?

Bemko’s wit shines through in this book, as does her honesty. A case in point would be her unvarnished explanation of one of very few dark moments in the revered television show’s history – the infamous “watermelon” sword incident. Bemko pulls no punches in her recollection of the episode in which a person identifying himself as “Steve” turned up at a Seattle appraisal in 1997 with a Confederate Civil-War-era sword he claimed to have found in the family attic. He stated that, as a child, he had used the sword to cut a watermelon. Then-Roadshow appraiser George Juno valued the sword at $35,000, to “Steve’s” overwhelming surprise and delight. But it turned out that the whole thing had been a hoax. The watermelon story was an unethical, entirely staged fabrication – but that was a minor concern compared to what would follow. According to the FBI, and as recounted in the book, descendants of Major Samuel J. Wilson, a Union officer in the Civil War, contacted the American Ordnance Preservation Association after viewing the appraisal and realizing the sword was the very one used by their ancestor. Juno and another dealer, Russ Pritchard III (who subsequently went to prison for a string of charges related to deceptive appraisal and resale practices) had previously appraised the sword for them, assessing a value of $8,000 and persuading them to sell the valuable heirloom to them. There is much more to that story, but the bottom line is that Bemko could have glossed this one over or left it out entirely, but she didn’t. She even admits, “The watermelon sword and other incidents really just started out as allegations, and our first instincts were to defend our guys.”

This single quote gets to the heart of what Antiques Roadshow really is, beyond its status as a seven-time Emmy© Award-nominated TV show. It’s a family, and one that intrigues us and makes us proud to be part of the antiques and fine art world.

Antiques Roadshow Behind the Scenes, full color, 182 pages, is a Touchstone Press book published by Simon and Schuster, and retails at $16.99. Purchase it through amazon.com by clicking here.

 

Copyright 2010 Auction Central News International. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

#   #   #

A bergere is a French upholstered armchair with closed upholstered sides.

Furniture Specific: Furniture with a French accent

A bergere is a French upholstered armchair with closed upholstered sides.

A bergere is a French upholstered armchair with closed upholstered sides.

Back in the Dark Ages of the 1970s my wife and I bought our first house. An old house built in 1928. A big house. And as apartment and dorm dwellers for many years we had a miniscule accumulation of furniture – the odd chair, a sewing machine cabinet and of course a homemade wine rack but little of real use. After we moved into our new old house – one trip in two cars – we realized we didn’t quite have enough “stuff” to fill that 2,400-square-foot space. What we especially didn’t have was furniture.

We furnished the bedroom from a junk store with what later turned out to be a pretty decent 1940s vintage Colonial Revival Federal style mahogany suite. Not bad for a first try for $90. The next effort was less successful – the search for a dining table. We thought we really liked a modern style table from a Scandinavian-type store, but about two hours after delivery we had them pick it back up. It just wasn’t us – and it also wasn’t the house. So we expanded our search, beginning with yard sales and garage sales.

Read more

Marklin No. 4135 twin upright steam or marine engine, $46,000. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Live steam powers a $2 million Winter sale at Morphy’s

Marklin No. 4135 twin upright steam or marine engine, $46,000. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Marklin No. 4135 twin upright steam or marine engine, $46,000. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

DENVER, Pa. – A show of force from European steam toy buyers, several of whom flew in to bid in person, drove Morphy Auctions’ Winter sale beyond the $2 million mark (inclusive of 15% buyer’s premium) over the weekend of Dec. 10-12, 2009. Part I of the extensive Pat and Lowell Wagner lifetime collection of antique steam engines and toys – abundantly stocked with examples by Marklin, Weeden, Doll et Cie., and Bing – proved an alluring drawcard, especially to German enthusiasts.

“There were at least 100 people specifically pursuing the steam toys, including three or four Germans who were very active bidders,” said Dan Morphy, owner and chief operating officer of Dan Morphy Auctions. “One thing I found surprising was that Europeans who collect steam toys also buy the full-size steam engines – they appreciate both categories. That’s not typically the case with American steam toy collectors.”

Morphy admitted he had been a bit concerned about the market’s ability to absorb 545 lots of steam engines and toys at one go. “But three or four days prior to the sale, I knew that section was going to ‘catch fire’ because of the unusually high number of absentee bids coming in via the Internet and by phone,” he said. “It wasn’t just the high end that was attracting bids, either. Marklin always tends to take care of itself and was very strong in this sale, but we were amazed at how much action there was in the low to mid range. Internet participation was substantial.”

In fact, 654 lots sold online through LiveAuctioneers, with a daily sell-through rate as high as 28.7% (day 3). Among the big winners purchased via the Internet was a circa-1920s Marklin gauge 1 Leipzig train station. An elusive model, the 38-inch by 16-inch toy handily surpassed its estimate to close at $12,000. Also selling online for $12,000 was a coveted George Brown General Jackson clockwork boat. The 14-inch American-made handpainted tin vessel had been estimated at $5,000-$8,000.

The auction’s top lot, a Marklin No. 4135 twin upright steam or marine engine described in the manufacturer’s 1904 catalog as a “hammer engine” featured a well-detailed faux-brick housing and chimney on a japanned base measuring 13½ inches by 17½ inches. It blew away its $2,000-$4,000 estimate to settle at $46,000 after a prolonged and heated battle between two deep-pocketed bidders.

A fine 22-inch Radiguet live-steam boat featuring an early “ram” front and with slight restoration noted to the bottom of the hull sailed past expectations of $5,000-$8,000 to drop anchor at $14,500.

Morphy said there was considerable crossover buying, which helped bolster results in nearly every category of the 3,200-lot sale. “It was a very well-attended event. We had close to 1,000 registered in-house bidders over the three days, with as many as 100 people in the gallery at any given time.”

The auction drew one of the largest turnouts of marble fanciers in Morphy’s history. “There were several collectors who carpooled and drove all the way from Indiana (a 9- to 10-hour drive) to bid on the marbles. It was their first time to our gallery – they loved it. Two minutes after the sale concluded, another marble collector consigned several very good pieces from his collection to our Spring Auction. Marbles are definitely becoming a category with a big following at our sales.” Pricewise, both handmade and machine-made marbles fared well. A complete box of 100 colorful machine-made Peltier marbles known as the “National Rainbo Line” well exceeded its estimate in achieving $3,800.

A small selection of Christmas antiques drew enthusiastic bids, especially the belsnickles. A superb 30-inch-tall German Santa candy container with bisque face and unusual blue “coat” that previously had been part of a private collection in Germany rang the register at $13,800, near the upper end of its estimate range. “When a candy container stands 2½ feet tall, it actually enters the realm of being not just a candy container but also a figure or statue,” Dan Morphy noted. “There were six people on the phones bidding for that piece, and two of them called after the sale to say they were sorry they hadn’t gone higher.”

Another standout lot was the Lionel prewar standard gauge No. 378W passenger train set with its original set box and individual boxes. Finished in lime green with yellow-frame windows, the ensemble was described in the auction catalog as “possibly the finest known example of this train set, showing no play wear whatsoever.” Against an estimate of $15,000-$20,000, it reached its final destination at $31,050. A Voltamp No. 2120 United Electric transformer-type trolley with original circular track and paper-labeled wood box realized an above-estimate price of $18,400.

An all-original circa-1890 penny farthing bicycle that almost missed inclusion in the sale surprised its consignor when it wheeled across the finish line at $9,800. “When we went to pick up a collection in the Midwest, we noticed it in the garage and loaded it onto the truck. It ended up making the most money of any of the items in that particular consignment,” Morphy said.

Other top lots included a circa-1910 Carette 12-inch hand-painted tin, clockwork limousine – $15,000; an 1894 popcorn and peanut wheeled vending machine – $7,500; a circa-1936 painted wood Fisher-Price No. 740 Push-Cart Pete toy, $9,200; and an Indian Rock Ginger Ale porcelain soda fountain syrup dispenser with original pump – $11,500.

After the auction, whose third session did not conclude until 10:30 p.m., Dan Morphy expressed both his pleasure with the $2 million result and relief over the way his auctions have consistently weathered the economic challenges of the past 18 months. “The market is different than it was before, but it’s just as unpredictable on the upside as it is on the downside,” he said. “If anything, my experts tell me they know less about pricing now than they ever have. Collectors will continue to determine what the prices should be.”

Dan Morphy Auctions will conduct a 2,100-lot auction on Feb. 26-27, 2010 featuring historical antiques, firearms and militaria; jewelry, toys and antique advertising. For additional information call 1-717-335-3435. Visit the online catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet in this sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

Click here to view Morphy Auctions’ complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Radiguet live-steam boat, 22 inches with early “ram” front, $14,500. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Radiguet live-steam boat, 22 inches with early “ram” front, $14,500. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


German belsnickle candy container in blue coat, 30 inches tall, with bisque face and rabbit-fur beard, $13,800. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

German belsnickle candy container in blue coat, 30 inches tall, with bisque face and rabbit-fur beard, $13,800. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


Complete box of Peltier National Rainbo machine-made marbles, $3,800. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Complete box of Peltier National Rainbo machine-made marbles, $3,800. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


Penny farthing bicycle, all original, $9,800. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Penny farthing bicycle, all original, $9,800. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


1894 popcorn and peanut vending cart similar to those seen on seaside boardwalks over a century ago, $7,500. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

1894 popcorn and peanut vending cart similar to those seen on seaside boardwalks over a century ago, $7,500. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


Circa-1900 Roth’s Pansy Gum dispenser, all original, in working order with key, $4,900. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Circa-1900 Roth’s Pansy Gum dispenser, all original, in working order with key, $4,900. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


Lionel prewar standard gauge No. 378W passenger train set with both its original set box and individual boxes, $31,050. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Lionel prewar standard gauge No. 378W passenger train set with both its original set box and individual boxes, $31,050. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.


Indian Rock Ginger Ale porcelain soda fountain syrup dispenser with original pump, $11,500. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Indian Rock Ginger Ale porcelain soda fountain syrup dispenser with original pump, $11,500. Image courtesy Dan Morphy Auctions.

Henry Gasser’s untitled watercolor of a boat shed and dory, 12 1/4 inches by 18 3/4 inches, has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate. Image of courtesy Outer Cape Auctions.

Avery, Gasser, Kahn works on paper bound for Outer Cape, Feb. 14

Henry Gasser’s untitled watercolor of a boat shed and dory, 12 1/4 inches by 18 3/4 inches, has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate. Image of courtesy Outer Cape Auctions.

Henry Gasser’s untitled watercolor of a boat shed and dory, 12 1/4 inches by 18 3/4 inches, has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate. Image of courtesy Outer Cape Auctions.

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. – Outer Cape Auctions will host its second art auction of the year on Feb. 14 with a sweet Milton Avery self-portrait ink on paper, a stunning early Henry Gasser watercolor and a Wolf Kahn etching among the 190 works of art being offered. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

The auction will again be conducted at the new Seashore Point Community, 100 Alden St. in Provincetown beginning at 4 p.m. Eastern. Previews will be held daily in the run-up to the auction.

Along with live bidding, phone and absentee bidding, Outer Cape Auctions will offer Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. Outer Cape Auctions will also provide a live audio/video feed for the Internet bidders.

The auction will start off with an early watercolor by Henry Gasser (1909-1981). The untitled work views a boat shed, a tarp-covered dory and the sea in the background. “This painting’s lines are straight and clean and the palette used, sensational,” said Terry Catalano, owner and auctioneer. The work measures 12 1/4 inches by 18 3/4 inches and is signed on the lower left, “H. Gasser.” The estimate is $1,000-$2,000 with an opening bid of $100.

“I love when I receive consignments without reserves because it gives me the opportunity to offer a fabulous work at a ridiculously low price, knowing full well that it will attract many bidders and hopefully, send the hammer price above the estimates,” said Catalano.

Milton Avery (1885-1965) is represented by a self-portrait ink on paper dated 1959. It had been appraised in September 1999 as being authentic and the authentication report is included with the work. A barely noticeable stain on the paper is the only visual defect, and the work is estimated to sell at $3,500-$4,500. An etching of a European bridge overpass by Wolf Kahn (born 1927) dated ’82 and hand-numbered 90 of 90 is also one of the sleepers of the auction with an estimate of $200-$400.

“Such strong and recognizable names are sure to garner a lot of interest,” said Catalano.

Other works by late artists being offered include three oils by Arthur Vidal Diehl (1870-1929), a beautiful dunescape dated 1946 by Raymond J. Eastwood (1898-1987) and a beautiful watercolor of a white picket fenced Cape Cod home by James Kirk Merrick (1905-1985). William F. Boogar Jr. (1893-1958) was a well-known Provincetown bronze sculpture artist and there are two works in the auction, a seagull and a lamp with original shade, top and the base designed as a dove taking flight. Robert Beauchamp (1923-1995), a Truro, Mass., artist is represented by a large oil measuring 50 inches by 40 inches and signed on verso. There are four works by Ada Rayner (1901-1998), the first wife of Henry Hensche; three works by William H. Littlefield (1902-1969) including an early impressionist landscape that was exhibited at the Cape Museum of Fine Art and was featured in the catalog; an oil painting of a pier, red shack and fishing boat and dory, most likely Rockport, by George Elmer Browne (1871-1946); and there is an oil painting of a sailing yacht named Thunderhead by Cleveland Woodward (1900-1986), another Truro, Mass., artist.

Malcolm Humphreys (1892-1963), Dorothy Lake Gregory (1890-1973), Henry Kallem (1912-1985), John Hare (1909-1978), James Lechay (1907-2001), Gerrit Hondius (1891-1970), Philip Evergood (1907-1973), Judith Shahn (1929-2009) and Cy Fried (1917-2010) also have works in the auction, among many other late artists.

On the contemporary front, Canadian Steve Walker, known for his many book covers and homo-erotic content paintings is represented by two original acrylic on canvases, Stay the Night and Jay and Clayton are on the block, along with two beautiful oils by Cape School of Art teacher Lois Griffel. There are works by Jackson Lambert (born 1919), Hilda Neily (born 1947), Michael E. Davis (born 1945), William Maynard (born 1921), John DiMestico (born 1949), Jack Garver (born 1921), Anne MacAdam (born 1930) and many more.

A painting by Paul Sattler, a contemporary Boston artist, titled Providence (Final Variation on Wtewael’s “Wedding of Peleus and Thetis”) that measures 60 x 72 and exhibits the Alpha Gallery, Boston, label and the date of 2003. A stunning work by Fernando DeOliveira titled Nirvana dated 2006 is also being offered along with the hard covered book about him and his art. There are three works by Canadian artist Joann Corno, two oils by Kathy Buist (born 1959) and many more.

For details call 508-487-7281.

There is a full preview online at www.outercapeauctions.com with multiple images, in-depth lot descriptions and artist’s information.

To view the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Outer Cape Auctions’ complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This self-portrait by Milton Avery, one of America’s pioneering colorists, is an original drawing, ink on paper, measuring 5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches. It has a $3,500-$4,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.

This self-portrait by Milton Avery, one of America’s pioneering colorists, is an original drawing, ink on paper, measuring 5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches. It has a $3,500-$4,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.


This dunescape by Raymond Eastwood is dated 1946. The 19 1/2- by 23 3/4-inch oil on canvas has a $2,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.

This dunescape by Raymond Eastwood is dated 1946. The 19 1/2- by 23 3/4-inch oil on canvas has a $2,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.


Largely self-taught Provincetown artist Arthur Diehl painted this untitled oil on board, which measures 11 1/2 inches by 8 1/8 inches. It has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.

Largely self-taught Provincetown artist Arthur Diehl painted this untitled oil on board, which measures 11 1/2 inches by 8 1/8 inches. It has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.


Robert Beauchamp, a figurative painter known for a colorful, expressionistic style, was active in Provincetown since the 1950s. This untitled oil on canvas, 50 by 40 inches, is dated ‘5/94,’ 10 months before he died. It has a $5,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.

Robert Beauchamp, a figurative painter known for a colorful, expressionistic style, was active in Provincetown since the 1950s. This untitled oil on canvas, 50 by 40 inches, is dated ‘5/94,’ 10 months before he died. It has a $5,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Outer Cape Auctions.

Poster for the 1960 film La Dolce Vita, whose character Papparazzo is said to have been inspired by celebrity photographer Felice Quinto. Fair use of copyrighted image provided by moviegoods.com, obtained through wikipedia.org.

Celebrity photographer Felice Quinto dies at 80

Poster for the 1960 film La Dolce Vita, whose character Papparazzo is said to have been inspired by celebrity photographer Felice Quinto. Fair use of copyrighted image provided by moviegoods.com, obtained through wikipedia.org.

Poster for the 1960 film La Dolce Vita, whose character Papparazzo is said to have been inspired by celebrity photographer Felice Quinto. Fair use of copyrighted image provided by moviegoods.com, obtained through wikipedia.org.

ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) – Felice Quinto, a renowned celebrity photographer and the likely model for the character Paparazzo in Federico Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita has died. He was 80.

Quinto died of pneumonia on Jan. 16 in Rockville, his wife, Geraldine Quinto, said Monday.

Quinto often was referred to as the “king of the paparazzi” – a term derived from the character in La Dolce Vita – and he pioneered some of the aggressive tactics that celebrity photographers use to this day.

He would hide in bushes, wear disguises and zip around Rome on a motorcycle, taking photos that appeared in gossip publications around the world.

Quinto was born in Milan in 1929 and befriended Fellini while living in Rome in the 1950s. According to his wife, Fellini asked Quinto to play a photographer in La Dolce Vita but he declined because he was making more money taking pictures. He briefly appeared in the film as a bystander.

“By the time Fellini came out with his movie, it was already about four years that I had been doing photography,” Quinto told the Dallas Morning News in 1985.

In 1960, Quinto snapped a picture of actress Anita Ekberg-who appeared in La Dolce Vita as a starlet hounded by Paparazzo-kissing a married movie producer at a cafe in Rome.

Quinto told ABC News in 1997 that Ekberg shot arrows at him as he stood outside her house at 5 a.m. One nicked Quinto’s hand, and another struck a photographer’s car.

Quinto married Geraldine Del Giorno, an American schoolteacher, in 1963, and moved to the United States that year to work for The Associated Press. His assignments for The AP included John F. Kennedy’s funeral and civil rights marches.

However, he was best known for his celebrity photography. He worked at the famed Studio 54 nightclub in the 1970s, and was Elizabeth Taylor’s personal photographer for a time.

He retired in 1993 and lived quietly with his wife in Montgomery Village. He published a book of his Studio 54 photography in 1997, and some of his photographs have been shown in museums.

Quinto voiced few regrets about the celebrity culture he helped create.

“People are human,” he said in 1997. “They want to see these pictures, and there is too much money to be made.”

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

#   #   #

 

Sounds of the Universe

Depeche Mode auctioning 12 unique wristwatches for charity

Sounds of the Universe

Sounds of the Universe

NEW YORK – The perennially popular English band Depeche Mode has joined forces with Swiss watchmakers Hublot, Geneva auction house Patrizzi & Co., and LiveAuctioneers.com to produce an unprecedented and never to be repeated auction fundraiser benefiting Britain’s Teenage Cancer Trust.

Online bidding is now in progress on a series of one dozen unique timepieces, each featuring the artwork from one of Depeche Mode’s 12 studio albums as its watch face. The Hublot watches are one-of-a-kind creations, packaged in exquisitely designed and individually themed presentation boxes. Each box contains not only the wristwatch but also a treasure trove of additional gifts personally chosen for inclusion by the members of Depeche Mode. Each box contains:

 

–       A deluxe vinyl version of the album

–       A USB Key containing a digital edition of the album and documentary about the making of the album

–       An original album artwork print and a framed gold CD

–       A photograph signed by all members of the group who contributed to the album, including Vince Clarke and Alan Wilder, both of whom are founder-members of Depeche Mode but no longer part of the band.

 

Bidding on the watches will conclude on Feb. 24, 2010. All proceeds generated from the Internet-only auction will be presented to Teenage Cancer Trust on Feb. 26 at the penultimate concert of Depeche Mode’s “Sounds of the Universe” tour in Dusseldorf, Germany. The tour includes a special Depeche Mode charity performance at London’s Royal Albert Hall on Feb. 17 – remarkably, the band’s first-ever appearance at the iconic venue.

“We are very proud to be able to help Depeche Mode with this important fundraiser,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO Julian R. Ellison. “Since the first teen cancer unit was launched in Britain 20 years ago, Teenage Cancer Trust has worked diligently and creatively to help improve the lives of young people afflicted with the disease. LiveAuctioneers is fully behind this charity, and we’re hopeful that the extraordinary timepiece gift sets in this auction will raise a significant sum for TCT’s ongoing programs.”

To view the fully illustrated electronic catalog containing the 12 Depeche Mode watches or to place a bid online, log on to https://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/20622.

About Depeche Mode:

Depeche Mode is one of the most successful, influential and longest-running bands to emerge during the new music movement that swept across Britain and the world in the early 1980s. The group has had 47 songs in the UK singles chart and No. 1 albums in the UK, USA and throughout Europe. According to EMI Records, Depeche Mode has sold more than 100 million albums and singles worldwide, making them the most successful electronic music group in music history.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Speak & Spell

Speak & Spell


A Broken Frame

A Broken Frame


Construction Time Again

Construction Time Again


Some Great Reward

Some Great Reward


Black Celebration

Black Celebration


Music for the Masses

Music for the Masses


Violator

Violator


Songs of Faith and Devotion

Songs of Faith and Devotion


Ultra

Ultra


Exciter

Exciter


Playing the Angel

Playing the Angel

These Imperial bowls are slightly different. One is 2 inches by 10 5/8 inches, the other 2 1/8-inches by 10 1/2 inches. They are decorated front and back and have underglaze blue seal marks for Qianlong (1736-1795). From the estate of Thomas E. Cody, the bowls are estimated at $50,000 to $80,000.

Imperial bowls from Cody Collection at Brunk Auctions, Feb. 20-21

These Imperial bowls are slightly different. One is 2 inches by 10 5/8 inches, the other 2 1/8-inches by 10 1/2 inches. They are decorated front and back and have underglaze blue seal marks for Qianlong (1736-1795). From the estate of Thomas E. Cody, the bowls are estimated at $50,000 to $80,000.

These Imperial bowls are slightly different. One is 2 inches by 10 5/8 inches, the other 2 1/8-inches by 10 1/2 inches. They are decorated front and back and have underglaze blue seal marks for Qianlong (1736-1795). From the estate of Thomas E. Cody, the bowls are estimated at $50,000 to $80,000.

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Buffalo Bill Cody bought his Wild West show to American towns and cities. His reenacted gun fights and Indian battles delighted the public for 30 years. Thomas English Cody (1889-1948) followed in his great-uncle’s footsteps, but it was the Far East he brought to the United States. In the 1930s, the singer and actor avidly collected Chinese porcelain and objects of hard stone. His superb 25-lot collection of Asian art is the centerpiece of Brunk Auctions sale Feb. 20-21.

For emphasis, Brunk chose Cody’s Chinese Imperial bowls for the cover of the sale’s color catalog. The pair, differing slightly in height and diameter, is decorated with nine blue peaches on a yellow ground with Qianlong (1736-1795) seal marks. Presale estimate on the pair is $50,000-$80,000.

Also of note from the Cody collection: a Chinese lidded jar in yellow glaze with an impressed seal for Daognang (1821-1850) and a Chinese aubergine-glazed bowl with a blue six-character mark for Yongzheng (1723-1735). The 11½-inch jar is expected to bring $6,000-$12,000; the 1 5/8-inch by 8 1/8-inch bowl, $5,000-$10,000.

For good measure, Brunk added 70 lots of Chinese art from other private collections that would, quite possibly, attract the attention of antique dealers from China. Midway through the collection of porcelain, pottery, bronze censors and carved stones is a 7 5/8-inch by 3 3/4-inch blue and white meiping (human form) vase. In blue underglaze are rocks, bamboo, roses, saplings, butterflies and a blooming prunus tree. Four lug handles are at the top; two horizontal slots at the bottom. The vase, estimated at $15,000-$30,000, descended in the family of Ferdinand Howard, an Ohio benefactor to the Columbus Museum of Art.

There’s a strange bull loose in the Brunk Auctions’ china shop. The beast shatters estimates, not Chinese porcelain. Last year, an Imperial vase skyrocketed from an estimate of $400 to $1,236,250. A bowl from the reign of the Yongzheng Emperor (1723-1735) began humbly at $150 and finished at $115,000. A $300 lavender blue vase ended honorably at $12,650. With estimates higher this time and porcelain fresh-to-the-market from noted collections, anything could happen.

The sale also includes more than 80 paintings dating from the early 18th century to the mid-20th century.

The earliest painting will reach the auction block within the first hour of the opening day. Thomas Broughton (1668-1737), a wealthy Indian trader and landowner, served as speaker of the 15th Assembly, lieutenant governor and governor of the South Carolina colony. He was the ideal candidate for a portrait during the early painting career of Henrietta Johnston (1670-1728), this country’s first-known female professional pastelist. Her pastel portrait of Broughton on blue laid paper with signature label verso is expected to bring $15,000-$25,000.

Three 20th-century paintings are expected to do well: Andrew Wyeth’s watercolor, The Road to Holiday’s Barn and Serge Poliakoff’s Composition and another abstract composition dated “5.1.60” (1960).

Poliakoff (1900-1969), a Russian abstract expressionist, was a major influence in post-World War II School of Paris and in the Tachisme art movement. The latter, also known as Art Informel, was described as “a lack or absence of form itself.” Both paintings are oil on wood panel, signed lower right and reflect Poliakoff’s mature style. Composition is earlier, 1955-1956, and brighter; the later composition is more somber and dark. A letter signed by the artist attesting to the painting’s authenticity, accompanies Composition. Each painting is estimated at $200,000-$300,000.

The Wyeth watercolor of a figure on a dirt road walking toward a barn is early and personal. Completed when he was only 18, Wyeth dedicated it to Miss Jessica Wallwork, a nurse who worked for the Wyeth family. He signed and dated (1935) an inscription to her lower right. The 16 1/2-inch by 21 1/2-inch watercolor carries an estimate of $25,000-$35,000.

A Brunk Auctions sale would not be complete without Southern furniture. Two pieces are important and of special interest. The Swisegood School is one of North Carolina’s premier furniture shops, and the sale’s walnut circa 1820 Swisegood corner cupboard, estimated at $40,000-$60,000, is excellent and original in all respects. In single case construction and towering 96 1/2 inches, it descended in a Forsyth County, N.C., family, not far from where it was crafted. At 91 1/2 inches, an early 19th-century cherry tall case clock from Kentucky, is almost cupboard height. Highly decorative with star and fylfot inlay and painted wooden dial with pink roses, it is expected to sell for $10,000-$20,000.

Brunk Auctions is located at 117 Tunnel Road, Asheville.

For details call 828-254-6846.

To view the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Brunk Auctions’ complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


From the top, note the shell-carved finial plinth, elaborately decorated waisted case, central bull’s-eye window and turned feet on this elegant early 19th-century Kentucky tall case clock. It has a $10,000-$20,000 estimate.

From the top, note the shell-carved finial plinth, elaborately decorated waisted case, central bull’s-eye window and turned feet on this elegant early 19th-century Kentucky tall case clock. It has a $10,000-$20,000 estimate.


The original blue paint on this Swisegood School corner cupboard can be seen under its orange and red painted surface. The cupboard was made in Davidson County, N.C., circa 1820. Note the rope-carved quarter columns, original brasses and original bracket feet. It has a $40,000-$60,000 estimate.

The original blue paint on this Swisegood School corner cupboard can be seen under its orange and red painted surface. The cupboard was made in Davidson County, N.C., circa 1820. Note the rope-carved quarter columns, original brasses and original bracket feet. It has a $40,000-$60,000 estimate.


The barn in this signed, inscribed and dated Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) watercolor is in Chadds Ford Pa. The painting was given as a gift in 1935 to a trusted nurse who served the Wyeth family, who in turn gave it to a friend in the 1950s. It has a $25,000-$35,000 estimate.

The barn in this signed, inscribed and dated Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) watercolor is in Chadds Ford Pa. The painting was given as a gift in 1935 to a trusted nurse who served the Wyeth family, who in turn gave it to a friend in the 1950s. It has a $25,000-$35,000 estimate.


A handwritten letter from artist Serge Poliakoff (1900-1969) dated June 23, 1969 attests to the authenticity of ‘Composition,’ accompanies the 1955-1956 signed painting. The oil on sand painting on panel, which measures 45 3/4 inches by 35 inches, has a $200,000-$300,000 estimate.

A handwritten letter from artist Serge Poliakoff (1900-1969) dated June 23, 1969 attests to the authenticity of ‘Composition,’ accompanies the 1955-1956 signed painting. The oil on sand painting on panel, which measures 45 3/4 inches by 35 inches, has a $200,000-$300,000 estimate.