FBI takes forged Wyeth painting from auction house

WILMINGTON, Delaware (AP) – The FBI says it has seized a forgery of Andrew Wyeth’s painting Snow Birds from a New York auction house.

The fake painting, seized in July, had been for sale at the unidentified auction house, and had been estimated to be worth between $300,000 and $500,000. However, before an auction took place, questions arose concerning its authenticity. An expert at the Andrew Wyeth office at the Brandywine River Museum identified it as a forgery.

The person selling the art agreed to forfeit his interest in the painting.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-10-26-10 1552EDT

 

‘Psycho’ – From Chris Kattan's personal collection, an original Alfred Hitchcock ‘Psycho’ movie poster framed in a black wood and glass frame and individually numbered 60/219 (approx. 36 1/4 inches x 14 1/2 inches). Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

Premiere Props produces annual horror film auction Oct. 30

‘Psycho’ – From Chris Kattan's personal collection, an original Alfred Hitchcock ‘Psycho’ movie poster framed in a black wood and glass frame and individually numbered 60/219 (approx. 36 1/4 inches x 14 1/2 inches). Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

‘Psycho’ – From Chris Kattan’s personal collection, an original Alfred Hitchcock ‘Psycho’ movie poster framed in a black wood and glass frame and individually numbered 60/219 (approx. 36 1/4 inches x 14 1/2 inches). Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. – Premiere Props is showcasing over 500 never-before-seen Halloween and horror props with Fangoria Entertainment as part of Fangoria’s annual Horror Movie Prop and Costume Live Auction on Saturday, Oct. 30. The sale will be conducted at Premiere Props’ warehouse beginning at 11 a.m. Pacific. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Fangoria’s annual Horror Movie Prop and Costume Live Auction features iconic items from some of Hollywood’s scariest films. Horror fans will jump at the chance to own Freddy Krueger’s ripped and blood-stained sweater from Friday the 13th or an original paper mask seen onscreen in Michael Myers’ hospital room from Rob Zombie’s Halloween. Additional horror memorabilia includes Michael Myers’ bat from Halloween II, the wooden bat used by horror legend Eli Roth in Inglourious Basterds, a large wooden cross from Exorcist: The Beginning and screen-used props from Saw III, including severed limbs and autographed boots from star Shawnee Smith. Hero costumes and props from Summit Entertainment’s Red (based on the Marvel comic book) including hatchets, the Red manila folder, rubber knives, the hero detonator pen and costumes worn by stars Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, John Malkovich and Bruce Willis will be on the auction block. Other props and costumes available come from Hollywood’s new classics, such as Sleepy Hollow, Devil, Red Dragon, Resident Evil, Afterlife, Sorority Row, My Bloody Valentine and more.

To scare up the Halloween feeling, the Premiere Props warehouse will be decorated in full fright mode, with a shopping spree to Robinson Beautilities in Los Angles awarded to a fan attending in the best costume. Horror celebrities will stop by the Premiere Props warehouse throughout the auction for special Q&A sessions.

“The Internet’s biggest sites and influencers have all come together to support this annual auction,” said Dan Levin, executive vice president of marketing for Premiere Props.

The live auction takes place on Saturday, October 30, at Premiere Props’ warehouse, 128 Sierra St., El Segundo, CA 90245. There will be a preview from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Pacific, before the auction starts at 11 a.m. Fangoria’s annual Horror Movie Prop and Costume Live Auction will be hosted by Leo Quinones from The Film Freak Movie Talk Show on KFWB NewsTalk 980AM Los Angeles and can be seen on Premiere Props’ three-camera live broadcast show online.

Fangoria’s annual Horror Movie Prop and Costume Live Auction will feature movie collectibles, props and costumes from the following:

  • Nightmare on Elm Street: Part 5: Freddy Krueger’s (Robert Englund) screen-worn, red and green half sweater, box framed in a metal six-side frame with three screen shots of Freddy and name plate.
  • Exorcist: The Beginning: Worn wooden cross-like design with painted stonses.
  • Saw III: Amanda’s (Shawnee Smith) black leather zip-up “Fahoes” boot, autographed by “Shawnee Smith Saw III” in black Sharpee.
  • Saw III: Bloody head wound piece used in Saw III framed with the Certificate of Authenticity, picture from the scene, SAW III logo, and Head Wound in a brown with glass box frame.
  • Saw III: Jigsaw’s (Tobin Bell) manila envelope given to Amanda during the Re-Birth scene, framed in a black metal with glass frame with a Certificate of Authenticity, screen shot, and film cell.
  • Saw III: Tim the Rackman’s (Mpho Koaho) screen-used, hero, prosthetic left leg with bone sticking out, framed in a black wood frame with the glass removed on the front, screen shot from the film, title plate, and Certificate of Authenticity.
  • Halloween II: Michael Myers (Tyler Mane) screen-used, hero, beat up metal baseball bat with dirty tape at the handle.
  • Halloween II: Laurie Strode’s (Scout Taylor-Compton) screen-used clear orange plastic with white plastic lid pill bottle and orange and white fake capsules inside.
  • Inglourious Basterds: Rusted silver metal ax with smooth thick wooden handle and thick blade with sharp edge.
  • Inglourious Basterds: Sgt. Donny Donowitz’s (Eli Roth) screen-used, hero, bloody, rubber and foam with wood insert, worn light brown wood “Hutton & Aldrich Co. Hard Knox, 100% Genuine Sugar Maple, Made In The USA Knoxville, TN” baseball bat broken in parts of the barrel with blood.
  • Piranha 3D: Sheriff Julie Forester’s (Elisabeth Shue) screen-worn, hero, bloody sheriff costume, includes shirt, tank, pants and wardrobe tag.
  • Piranha 3D: Matt Boyd’s (Richard Dreyfuss) screen-used, hero, slightly bloody, wood oar.
  • Resident Evil: Afterlife: Alice’s (Milla Jovovich) Hero, bloody silver-painted wooden dummy katana.
  • Resident Evil: Afterlife: Claire Redfield’s (Ali Larter) screen-worn, hero, dirty from production, black and green nylon, metal clip in the front, pocket in the back, “Blackhawk” tactical belt with attached gun holster with two leg straps with clips in the front.
  • Sleepy Hollow: Hessian Horseman’s (Christopher Walken) screen-used, hero, brown and black hard rubber right handed ax.
  • My Bloody Valentine: Murdered nurse’s screen worn, bloody and ripped white short sleeve “Landau” nurses uniform and white “The Body Company” nurses shoes.
  • Sorority Row: Mrs. Crenshaw’s (Carrie Fisher) screen-used, hero, brown wood cane with gold wood pigeon on the top.
  • Sorority Row: Ellie Morris’ (Rumer Willis) screen-used, hero, brown wood makeshift weapon.
  • Sorority Row: Bloody white, brown and red wool large “Blood-Soaked Ground Blanket” with tassels.
  • Devil: Black with white and red “Devil” logo on one side and red “M. Night Shyamalan” chair back.
  • Scary Movie 4: Cindy’s (Anna Faris) screen used, stainless steel scalpel.

Premiere Props is the leading marketing memorabilia company to market, authenticate, package, and distribute exclusive movie memorabilia. Since 2001, Premiere Props has represented over 300 movies. Premiere Props works with some of the largest motion picture studios and independent distributors in the world, such as Paramount Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox, Miramax, MGM, The Weinstein Company, Sony Screen Gems, Lionsgate, TriStar, Spyglass Entertainment, Summit Entertainment, Alcon and many more.

Fangoria sliced its way onto the scene in 1979, becoming the only national publication devoted to the modern horror genre. Three decades later, Fangoria is still the number one authority on all things scary. Fangoria provides the best in horror entertainment and news coverage including the website, magazine, comic book division, convention circuit, and TV On-Demand Channel.

For details visit Premiere Props’ website: www.premiereprops.com or call 310-322-7767.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


‘Frankenstein’ (1931) – From Chris Kattan's personal collection, this is a photo of The Monster in ‘Frankenstein,’ with the autograph of Boris Karloff (The Monster) on a index card, framed and matted, (approx. 18 1/2 inches x 14 3/4 inches). Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

‘Frankenstein’ (1931) – From Chris Kattan’s personal collection, this is a photo of The Monster in ‘Frankenstein,’ with the autograph of Boris Karloff (The Monster) on a index card, framed and matted, (approx. 18 1/2 inches x 14 3/4 inches). Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

‘Batman’ – From Chris Kattan's personal collection this is a ‘Batman’ logo picture signed by the cast including Michael Keaton (Batman), (approx. 14 inches x 12 inches). Estimate: $800-$1,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

‘Batman’ – From Chris Kattan’s personal collection this is a ‘Batman’ logo picture signed by the cast including Michael Keaton (Batman), (approx. 14 inches x 12 inches). Estimate: $800-$1,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

‘Batman’ (1989) – This is Batman's (Michael Keaton) jumpsuit worn under armored costume, custom made  by ‘Phil Reynolds Costumes,’ ‘Name: Michael K. and Character: Batman’ is handwritten on the inside tag. Estimate: $800-$1,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

‘Batman’ (1989) – This is Batman’s (Michael Keaton) jumpsuit worn under armored costume, custom made by ‘Phil Reynolds Costumes,’ ‘Name: Michael K. and Character: Batman’ is handwritten on the inside tag. Estimate: $800-$1,000. Photo copyright Premiere Props.

Barry Weber, image courtesy of Antiques Roadshow.

In Memoriam: Antiques Roadshow appraiser Barry Weber, 59

Barry Weber, image courtesy of Antiques Roadshow.

Barry Weber, image courtesy of Antiques Roadshow.

NEW YORK – Popular Antiques Roadshow appraiser and fine jewelry expert Barry Weber died on Oct. 19, 2010 from bladder cancer. He was 59.

Barry Weber was a 30-year veteran in the field of antique jewelry. He was president and CEO of Edith Weber Inc. of Madison Avenue in New York City, a company specializing in fine antique jewelry for more than 50 years.

Weber grew up in the antiques trade, living in his grandparents’ antiques shop as a child and assisting in all facets of their business. He traveled throughout Europe and the United States with his mother, Edith, in search of rare antique jewels for their growing clientele throughout the 1970s and ’80s.

Following in the trail blazed by his mother, Barry Weber was also a specialist in historic jewelry, and had bought and sold jewelry belonging to such notables as George Washington, Lafayette, Napoleon, Lord Byron, Dolly Madison, and many members of European royal families.

Jewels from Edith Weber have been seen at many red carpet events including the Academy Awards and Golden Globe Awards. Additionally, they have been featured on the covers of major national magazines such as In Style, W, and People.

Over the last three decades, Edith Weber Jewelry was a featured exhibitor at fine antiques shows throughout the United States. In recent years, the Webers focused their efforts on their three retail locations at the historic Carlyle Hotel in New York City, catering to an international clientele of celebrities, collectors and connoisseurs.

Barry Weber was a member of the Appraisers Association of America and the Jewelry Historians Society of America. He taught antique jewelry appraisal classes at several colleges and universities, pioneering a series of revolutionary hands-on seminars teaching the intricacies of the identification and evaluation of antique jewelry to novices and seasoned industry professionals both.

Widely respected for his wealth of knowledge, Weber also created and supervised the institution of jewelry-vetting standards for all antiques shows managed by the Antiques Council of America, and served as chairman of the Jewelry Standards Committee for the Los Angeles Antiques Show for 13 years. He appraised jewelry for PBS Television’s Antiques Roadshow for 15 seasons.

An accomplished musician and music teacher, Weber had a particular fondness for the blues. He was well known within his large circle of friends for his prowess on slide guitar.

Weber is survived by his wife Sonja, his son Adam, and his mother Edith. His funeral services were held on Oct. 24 at Temple Emanu-el in Long Beach, New York. His family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue New York, NY 10065, for “The Drs. Bajorin/Russo Bladder Cancer Research Fund.”

#   #   #

Auction Central News wishes to thank the Antiques Roadshow’s Publicity Office for biographical information contained in this tribute to Barry Weber.

Honus Wagner T206 baseball card, 1909-1911, being offered at auction on Nov. 4 to benefit the School Sisters of Notre Dame. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Baltimore nuns auctioning rare baseball card to benefit diocese

Honus Wagner T206 baseball card, 1909-1911, being offered at auction on Nov. 4 to benefit the School Sisters of Notre Dame. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Honus Wagner T206 baseball card, 1909-1911, being offered at auction on Nov. 4 to benefit the School Sisters of Notre Dame. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

DALLAS – The School Sisters of Notre Dame in Baltimore are about to receive a little divine love from the Holy Grail of baseball cards. A newly discovered T206 Honus Wagner card, left to the convent by the brother of a member of the order when he passed away, will be auctioned on Nov. 4 at Heritage Auctions’ Dallas gallery.

The card is estimated to bring in excess of $100,000.

“The proceeds from the sale of this card will go to benefit the work of the School Sisters of Notre Dame all over the world, in about 35 countries,” said Sister Virginia Muller, treasurer for the Baltimore convent. “Wherever the need is, we will share it.”

New T206 Wagner cards turn up about as often as bottles of 1921 Dom Perignon, Action Comics #1 or a diamond the size of a fist. Nonetheless, this example turned up in mid-summer 2010 when the card, which belonged to the blood brother of a member of the order, was left to the convent upon his passing earlier this year.

While the condition is not great – far below the most famous of T206 examples, which sold for $2,000,000 – it is still quite valuable, has caught the attention of collectors everywhere and represents a remarkable find in the world of high-end cardboard. It arrived to the auction house wrapped in plastic, with a note that read: “Although damaged, the value of this baseball card should increase exponentially throughout the 21th century!”

“For the first time ever, this copy of this coveted rarity is being placed on the auction block,” said Chris Ivy, director of Heritage Sports Collectibles, “adding one to the tally of genuine representations, generally agreed to hover right around fifty.”

It was Wagner himself who pulled the plug on the use of his image on the card, creating history’s most famous baseball card, though the reason is a subject of good-spirited debate among aficionados everywhere.

“The most popular story is that Wagner wanted no role in the promotion of tobacco use to kids,” said Ivy. “Another theory argues that it was nothing more than a failure to agree on money that led the American Tobacco Company to end production of Wagner’s card soon after it started.”

“I had no idea who Honus Wagner was before we saw this baseball card,” said Sister Virginia, “but I’ve certainly tried read everything I can about him now.”

Either way, the boon to the School Sisters of Notre Dame is obvious, and the potential good work done as a result of the sale of this card will only add to Wagner’s legend.

#   #   #

 

Normandie /Service Régulier, 1935, A.M. Cassandre, 23 3/4 inches x 39 inches. Poster for the new French ocean liner Normandie. Estimate: $12,000-$15,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

Poster Auctions International’s Nov. 14 sale stars A.M. Cassandre

Normandie /Service Régulier, 1935, A.M. Cassandre, 23 3/4 inches x 39 inches. Poster for the new French ocean liner Normandie. Estimate: $12,000-$15,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

Normandie /Service Régulier, 1935, A.M. Cassandre, 23 3/4 inches x 39 inches. Poster for the new French ocean liner Normandie. Estimate: $12,000-$15,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

NEW YORK – Forty-five posters by A.M. Cassandre, regarded as “the Master of Art Deco,” will be featured in Poster Auctions International’s 51st auction of rare, vintage posters on Sunday, Nov. 14. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding for the 556-lot sale. The auction will begin at 11 a.m. Eastern.

The group represents the largest exhibition of original posters by the artist ever assembled. These images by Cassandre, one of the greatest graphic designers of the 20th century, capture the best of the era, displaying the origins of Modern art.

Highlights include his most famous ship and travel posters, from the raw power of the Nord Express and the timeless Normandie to the quiet and haunting Route Bleue.

Also on display will be his iconic advertisements for food and fashion, including the revolutionary Dubonnet and the Cubist-inspired Grand-Sport. Adding flavor to this already-exciting collection are some rare variants, unrealized prints, and books by the artist, including his Ernest hat poster, one of three known copies in the world.

Also available at the auction will be the other Five Stars: Cappiello (38 posters and three maquettes); Cheret (38 posters spanning 40 years); Mucha (20 Art Nouveau gems); and Toulouse-Lautrec (half of his entire poster output is on display:15 masterpieces of poster art).

Themes include Avant-Garde (Dada images and works of the Schwitters, Tschichold, Hofman and the Stenberg Bros.); Film Posters (including a rare 1930 Mickey Mouse); Show Posters (11 circus, five Buffalo Bill, 13 Magic, such as Houdini, Blackstone, Thurston, Carter, and Chung-Ling Soo); and Mele (eight Italian fashion posters). The sale is replete with top auto posters , early aviation shows, bicycle posters and fine travel posters. Top books and periodicals for the serious collector include Le Tumulte Noir, Das Plakat and Arts et Metiers Graphiques.

Additional artists include Barbier, Barrere, Beardsley, Beggarstaff, Bernhard, Bonnard, Bouisset, Broders, Camps, Cardinaux, Carlu, Colin (14 posters), Domergue, Dudovich, DeFeure, Gesmar, Grasset, Grun, Heine, Hohenstein, Hohlwein, Livemont, Loupot, Mayakovsky, Metlicovitz, Nizzoli, Orazi, Pal, Penfield, Ragan, Steinlen (12 of his best), Toussaint and d’Ylen.

The auction will be conducted at the International Poster Center, 601 W. 26th St., (between 11th and 12th avenues), 13th floor, in Manhattan.

For 25 years, Poster Auctions International, in conjunction with the International Poster Center, has been the world’s preeminent auctioneer of original, vintage posters.

For information: www.posterauctions.com or contact Angelina Lippert at 212-787-4000.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Dubonnet, circa 1956, A.M. Cassandre, 47 1/8 inches x 66 3/8 inches, third installment in the Dubonnet triptych. Estimate:  $4,000-$5,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

Dubonnet, circa 1956, A.M. Cassandre, 47 1/8 inches x 66 3/8 inches, third installment in the Dubonnet triptych. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

Étoile du Nord, 1927, A.M. Cassandre (Adolphe Mouron, 1901-1968) 29 7/8 inches x 41 1/2 inches, Hachard, Paris. The North Star was the name of a Paris-to-Amsterdam express train run by the Compagnie des Wagons-Lits. Estimate: $25,000-$30,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

Étoile du Nord, 1927, A.M. Cassandre (Adolphe Mouron, 1901-1968) 29 7/8 inches x 41 1/2 inches, Hachard, Paris. The North Star was the name of a Paris-to-Amsterdam express train run by the Compagnie des Wagons-Lits. Estimate: $25,000-$30,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

La Route Bleue, 1929, A.M. Cassandre, 24 1/4 inches x 38 3/4 inches. Advertisement for a luxury bus service run by the P.L.M. Railroad from London to the Côte d'Azur. Estimate $17,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

La Route Bleue, 1929, A.M. Cassandre, 24 1/4 inches x 38 3/4 inches. Advertisement for a luxury bus service run by the P.L.M. Railroad from London to the Côte d’Azur. Estimate $17,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Poster Auctions International.

Re-creation of woolly mammoths in a late Pleistocene landscape in northern Spain. Artwork by Mauricio Anton. © 2008 Public Library of Science, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license.

Snowmass wants experts to help with woolly mammoth

Re-creation of woolly mammoths in a late Pleistocene landscape in northern Spain. Artwork by Mauricio Anton. © 2008 Public Library of Science, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license.

Re-creation of woolly mammoths in a late Pleistocene landscape in northern Spain. Artwork by Mauricio Anton. © 2008 Public Library of Science, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license.

SNOWMASS VILLAGE, Colo. (AP) – Officials in Snowmass Village want experts to take control of the site where the bones of a woolly mammoth were found earlier this month.

Directors of the town’s water district voted unanimously Monday to pursue a formal agreement with the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. They want the museum to be responsible for the fenced-off area where the bones were discovered during a construction project and to take charge of an exhibit of some of the bones.

The bones were put on display for three days last week and water district manager Kit Hamby tells The Aspen Times that over 1,000 adults and children came to see them.

Hamby says district workers are so busy showing off bones they can’t do their regular jobs.

___

Information from: The Aspen Times, http://www.aspentimes.com/

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-10-26-10 1155EDT

 

Peter Coeln, WestLicht-Gründer mit dem ‘Daguerreotype Giroux’ von 1839. Die erste kommerzielle verkaufte Kamera erzielte 732.000,00 Euro im Mai 2010 bei Westlicht. Foto höflichst von WestLicht überlassen.

Auktionsgespräche: WestLicht aus Wien im Brennpunkt

Peter Coeln, WestLicht-Gründer mit dem ‘Daguerreotype Giroux’ von 1839. Die erste kommerzielle verkaufte Kamera erzielte 732.000,00 Euro im Mai 2010 bei Westlicht. Foto höflichst von WestLicht überlassen.

Peter Coeln, WestLicht-Gründer mit dem ‘Daguerreotype Giroux’ von 1839. Die erste kommerzielle verkaufte Kamera erzielte 732.000,00 Euro im Mai 2010 bei Westlicht. Foto höflichst von WestLicht überlassen.

Westlicht will eine Symbiose zwischen Apparatur und Fotografie herstellen. Technophile und Seh-Sinnige sollen an gleichem Ort verbindend mit Information und kreativer Leistung befriedigt werden. WestLicht in Wien ist eine Fotogalerie, ein Auktionshaus, eine Fotobibliothek und ein Kameramuseum. WestLicht ist ein Ort, um die Geheimnisse der fotographischen Technik zu erlernen. WestLicht hat sogar ein angeschlossenes Kamerageschäft und ist ein Traum für Fotoenthusiasten.

Das ganze Geschäft ist wie wahnsinnig in den letzten Jahren gewachsen“, sagte

Martin Reinhart. Er nennt sich bescheiden „eine Art Filmhersteller“ und lehnt es ab

dies zu erklären, weil seine Arbeit bei WestLicht so vielfältig ist.

„Zuerst kam der Leica Shop, welcher von Peter Coeln vor etwa 18 Jahren gegründet wurde“, erklärt Reinhart. „Dieses ist nicht mit der Firma Leica verbunden, aber er (Coeln) hat ein gutes Verhältnis zur Firma und ist der Einzige auf der Welt, der den Leica Namen auf diese Art verwenden darf.“

Der Verkauf umfasst neue und gebrauchte Leicas und Kameras von jedem bedeutenden Kamerahersteller, erweitert mit fotografischer Ausrüstung und herrlichen Sammlungen wie Spy-, Stereolithographie- und Panoramakameras, wunderbarer Beleuchtung sogar Kameraliteratur und Kamerawerbung.

Coeln beabsichtigte eine Symbiose zwischen dem Technischen und dem Künstlerischen, dem Informierenden und dem Kreativen als er WestLicht als Fotographiegalerie 2001

begann.

„Die Auktionen, die vor etwa acht Jahren begonnen wurden, waren fast ein sofortiger Erfolg“, sagte Reinhart. Der Anfang war steinig. Zwanzig Minuten vor dem Beginn der ersten Auktion hatte der Auktionator einen Herzinfarkt und musste ins Krankenhaus.

„Normalerweise fragen die Menschen “ist ein Arzt im Hause?” Wir mussten hinaus gehen und das Publikum fragen, “ist ein Auktionator im Hause”, erinnerte Reinhart.

Glücklicherweise war James E Cornwall, der vor kurzem sein eigenes Fotographie-Auktionshaus in Köln geschlossen hatte, im Publikum und erbot sich zu übernehmen.

“Er blieb 4 – 5 Jahre und war für die Kunden von Cornwall ein wirklich guter Übergang“, bemerkte Reinhart.

WestLicht leitet Kamera- und Fotographieauktionen. Seit dem ersten Foto im Jahre 1826 hat sich der fotografische Vorgang ständig neu erfunden: Daguerreotypie, Glasplattennegative, grossformatige Filmfotografie, 35mm Filme, Polaroid, Pocket-Kameras, Disc-Kameras, Digitalkameras.

WestLichts Kunden sind sehr unterschiedlich. Der Kameramarkt ist eine geschlossene Gesellschaft von Enthusiasten.

“Sie besprechen sich untereinander”, sagte Reinhart. “Ich kenne Leute, die alles haben müssen. Sie besitzen Museen in ihren Kellern und etikettieren alles. Andere interessieren sich für antike Kameras und Linsen, weil diese ein ganz spezielles Bild ermöglichen.”

“Das Gebiet der Fotografie ist für Sammler besonders interessant”, bemerkte Reinhart. Kunden der WestLicht Foto-Auktion können ein besonderes Genre wie etwa Züge oder Landschaften suchen oder einen Lieblingsfotografen oder spezielle fotografische Vorgänge oder klassische Fotografien als Investition.

“Die fotografische Kunst von morgen wird heute entwickelt”. Reinhart äussert sich enthusiastisch über die kleine Gruppe der 20jährigen, die sich sehr für den Gebrauch von analogen Kameras und für Dunkelkammern interessiert, um ihre eigene Kunst zu kreieren. Es gibt ein wiederauflebendes Interesse an der Polaroidmethode.

„Analoge Photografie existiert noch immer und Menschen pflegen sie”, sagte Reinhart. “Es gibt ein Zurück zur Handwerkskunst in der Fotografie – eine Menge guter Arbeit wurde geleistet”.

WestLicht wird separate Kamera- und Fotografieauktionen am Samstag, den 4. Dezember 2010 veranstalten. Highlight der Kameraauktion ist eine schwarz lackierte Leica MP2 mit einem Wetzlarmotor, eine von nur sechs Exemplaren aus den späten 50er Jahren mit einem Schätzpreis von 150.000,– bis 180.000,– EUR.

Es wird auch eine sehr seltene Lancaster (1890) Miniaturkamera in Form einer Taschenuhr angeboten. Objektiv und Verschluss sind auf einem 6 gliedrigem Teleskop-Auszug montiert, der sich beim Öffnen des Uhrengehäuses mittels einer Feder selbst entfaltet. Bei dieser Miniaturkamera werden 50.000,– bis 60.000 EUR erwartet.

Internationale Highlights der kommenden WestLicht Photographica Auktion werden Arbeiten von Hans Watzek, Elliott Erwitt, Nobuyoshi Araki und von vielen anderen sein. Um die Onlineauktion zu sehen, besuchen sie www.westlicht.at und für Kameras besuchen bitte www.leicashop.com

 

Kunst- & Auktionshaus Herr, Köln, tritt LiveAuctioneers bei

LiveAuctioneers heisst das Kunst- & Auktionshaus Herr als neues Mitglied willkommen. Das Auktionshaus Herr besteht seit 1982 in Köln und hat sich auf die Bereiche Jugendstil, Art Déco, Bauhaus und Design des 20. Jahrhunderts spezialisiert. Die nächste Auktion findet am 11. November 2010 statt. Im 1. Teil der Auktion kommen mit der Angewandten Kunst kunsthandwerkliche Objekte aus den Bereichen Silber, Metalle, Schmuck, Porzellan, Keramik, Glas, Skulpturen, Gemälde und Grafiken zum Aufruf. Ein besonderer heighlight ist eine private Sammlung von 175 Jugendstilobjekten mit 154 Jugendstil-Glasobjekten.

Der 2. Teil der Auktion, welche am 20. November 2010 stattfindet, konzentriert sich auf Möbel, Leuchten und außergewöhnliches Design des 20. Jahrhunderts. Für weiterführende Informationen besuchen Sie bitte: www.Herr-Auktionen.de

Kommende Auktionen

November 2010

5.11. Auktionhaus Eppli, Stuttgart: Benefizauktion zugunsten d. Fördervereins Wildpark Pforzheim e.V. mit Edelschmuck und Waren aller Art. www.Eppli.com

5.11. Galerie Widmer Auktionen, St. Gallen: Ausgewählte Werke; 19.11. Sonderauktion Carl Walter Liner. www.GalerieWidmer.ch

10.-13. 11. Dobiaschofsky Auktionen, Bern: Gemälde (15.-21. Jh.), Grafiken und Plakate, Möbel, Antiquitäten und Schmuck. www.Dobiaschofsky.com

11.11. Dr. Fischer Kunstauktionen, Heilbronn: Ikonen, Russische Kunst & Fabergé. www.Auctions-Fischer.de

11.11. Von Zezschwitz Kunst und Design, München: Moderne und Zeitgenössische Kunst. www.Von-Zezschwitz.de

14.11. Sotheby’s, Genf: Wichtige Uhren; 16.11. Prächtige Juwelen & ein ausgezeichneter rosa Diamant. www.Sothebys.com

17.- 20.11. David Feldman Philatelists, Genf: thematisierte Auktionen einschließlich Weltraritäten & Sammlungen; Olympics & Tennis; Frankreich, Großbritannien und die Kolonien; Schweiz and Mexico. www.DavidFeldman.com

19.11. Doebele Kunstauktionen, Berlin: Kunst des 20. und 21. Jh. www.fine-art-doebele.de

20. 11. Auction Team Breker, Köln: Wissenschaft & Technik; Büro Antik; Spielzeug & Puppen, Automaten. www.Breker.com

22. 11. Ketterer Kunst, Hamburg: Maritime und Norddeutsche Kunst; Wertvolle Bücher, Manuskripte, Autographen, Dekorative Graphik. www.KettererKunst.de

Dezember 2010

2.-4. 12. Auktionshaus Kaupp, Sulzburg: Kunsthandwerk; Juwelen & Uhren; Gemälde, Antiquitäten & Mobiliar; Moderne & Zeitgenössische Kunst. www.Kaupp.de

3.-4. 12. Leipziger Münzhandlung und Auktion Heidrun Höhn, Leipzig. www.Muenzen-Leipzig.de

4. 12. Ketterer Kunst, München: Moderne Kunst; Nach 1945/Zeitgenössische Kunst. www.KettererKunst.de

4. 12. Schmidt Kunstauktionen, Dresden: Bildende Kunst des 17.-21. Jh. www.Schmidt-Auktionen.de

6.12. Sotheby’s, Zurich: Schweizer Kunst. www.sothebys.com

7.12. Quittenbaum Kunstauktionen, München: Studio Glas; Höhepunkte der Design-Geschichte VII – Tischkultur. www.Quittenbaum.de

9.12. Von Zezschwitz Kunst und Design, München: Italienisches Design. www.von-zezschwitz.de

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Der österreichische Maler Egon Schiele fotografiert von Anton Josef Trčka 1914. Negativ signierter Vintage-Print mit einem Schätzpreis von 50.000,-- bis 60.000 EUR. Foto höflichst von WestLicht überlassen.

Der österreichische Maler Egon Schiele fotografiert von Anton Josef Trčka 1914. Negativ signierter Vintage-Print mit einem Schätzpreis von 50.000,– bis 60.000 EUR. Foto höflichst von WestLicht überlassen.

Peter Coeln, WestLicht-Gründer mit dem ‘Daguerreotype Giroux’ von 1839. Die erste kommerzielle verkaufte Kamera erzielte 732.000,00 Euro im Mai 2010 bei Westlicht. Foto höflichst von WestLicht überlassen.

Auction Talk Germany: Focus on WestLicht in Vienna

WestLicht Founder Peter Coeln poses with the 1839 wood Giroux Daguerréotype camera which brought 732,000.00 Euro ($1,021,944) including buyer’s premium in WestLicht’s May, 2010 auction. Photo courtesy WestLicht.

WestLicht Founder Peter Coeln poses with the 1839 wood Giroux Daguerréotype camera which brought 732,000.00 Euro ($1,021,944) including buyer’s premium in WestLicht’s May, 2010 auction. Photo courtesy WestLicht.

A fusion of camera and image, the technical and the creative, WestLicht in Vienna has a wide-angle lens on photography. It serves as a photo gallery, auction house, photography library, camera museum; a place to learn about the mysteries of photographic technique; an event space, et al. It even has an affiliated camera shop. To find all of this in one place is a photo enthusiast’s dream.

“The whole business has grown insanely in the last years,” said Reinhart. He modestly calls himself “sort of a film maker,” but declined to declare a job title because his work at WestLicht is so varied.

“First came LeicaShop, founded by Peter Coeln about 18 years ago,” explained Reinhart. “It is not associated with the Leica company, but he (Coeln) has a good relationship with the company and is the only one in the world allowed to use the Leica name in this way.”

The sale of new and vintage Leicas and cameras from every major camera manufacturer expanded to include photographic accoutrement and delightful collectibles such as spy, stereo and panorama cameras, magic lanterns, and even some camera literature and advertising.

Coeln intended a symbiosis between the technical and the artistic, the informational and the creative, when he started WestLicht as a photography gallery in 2001.

“The auctions started about eight years ago and were almost an immediate success,” said Reinhart.

Not that the beginning wasn’t rocky. Twenty minutes before the start of the first auction the auctioneer had a heart attack and had to go to the hospital.

“Usually people are asking, ‘Is there a doctor in the house?’ We had to go out into the audience and ask, ‘Is there an auctioneer in the house?’” recalled Reinhart.

Fortunately James E Cornwall, who had recently closed his own photography auction house in Cologne, was in the audience and volunteered to take over.

“He ended up staying on as auctioneer for 4-5 years, which was a really good transition for the customers of Cornwall’s,” noted Reinhart.

WestLicht conducts camera and photography auctions. Since the first image of reality was captured in 1826, the photographic process has reinvented its self many times: Daguerreotypes, glass negatives, large format film photography, 35mm film, Polaroid, pocket cameras, disc cameras, digital cameras. WestLicht’s customers are as diverse as the medium.

“With the camera equipment, it’s a close, small society of enthusiasts. They have their thing and they communicate amongst themselves,” said Reinhart. “I know people who have to have everything. They have museums in their basements with everything tagged. Others are interested in the antique cameras and lenses because they produce a very special kind of look.”

The photography field, noted Reinhart, is much more open to collectors. Customers at WestLicht photo auctions may be searching for a certain genre such as trains or landscapes; photos taken by a favorite photographer; photos made using a specific photographic process, or even classic photographs as an investment.

The photographic art of tomorrow is being generated today. Reinhart is enthusiastic about the small group of 20-somethings who are very interested in using analog cameras and darkrooms to create their art. He said there is also a resurgence of interest in the Polaroid method.

“Analog photography still exists and people still care about it,” said Reinhart. “There is a return to handcraft in photography – a lot of good work is being done.”

WestLicht will hold separate camera and photography auctions on Saturday, Dec. 4.

Highlight of the camera auction is a black lacquered Leica MP2 with a Wetzlar motor, one of only six examples made in the late 1950s, estimated price 150,000 to 180,000 Euro. A tiny 1890 Lancaster Watch Camera, shaped like a telescoping pocket watch, is expected to fetch 50,000-60,000 Euro ($69,800-$83,760).

The photo auction features an international array of work by Hans Watzek, Elliott Erwitt, Nobuyoshi Araki and many others. To view online auction catalogs, visit www.westlicht.at. For camera retail sales, visit www.leicashop.com

 

Art and Auctionhouse Herr, Cologne, joins LiveAuctioneers

LiveAuctioneers welcomes art auction house Herr, Cologne, as a new member of our auction-house family. The company has been serving the Cologne area since 1982. Herr Auctions specializes in Jugendstil, Art Déco, Bauhaus und 20th Century Design. Their next auction is on Nov.11. Part one includes handcrafted works of silver, metal, jewelry, porcelain, ceramic and glass, plus sculptures, paintings and prints. A special highlight is the 175-piece private collection of Jugendstil objects, featuring 154 pieces of Jugendstil glass. Part two of the Nov. 20 auction offers 20th-century design furniture, lighting and accessories. For more information please visit www.Herr-Auktionen.de

 

Upcoming Auctions

November 2010

5.11. Auktionhaus Eppli, Stuttgart: Benefit auction to support the Wildpark Pforzheime. Fine jewelry and wares of every type. www.Eppli.com

5.11. Galerie Widmer Auktionen, St. Gallen: Selected Art Works; 19.11. Paintings by Carl Walter Liner. www.GalerieWidmer.ch

10.-13. 11. Dobiaschofsky Auktionen, Bern: Paintings from the 15th to 21st century. Prints and Adverstisements, Furniture, Antiques and Jewelry. www.Dobiaschofsky.com

11.11. Dr. Fischer Kunstauktionen, Heilbronn: Icons, Russian Art & Fabergé. www.Auctions-Fischer.de

11.11. Von Zezschwitz Kunst und Design, Munich: Modern und Contemporary Art. www.Von-Zezschwitz.de

14.11. Sotheby’s, Geneva: Important Watches; 16.11. Exquisite Jewelry & an Outstanding Pink Diamond. www.Sothebys.com

17.- 20. 11. David Feldman Philatelists, Genf: themed auctions including World Rarities & Collections; Olympics & Tennis; France, Great Britain and the Colonies; Switzerland and Mexico. www.DavidFeldman.com

19.11. Doebele Kunstauktionen, Berlin: Art of the 20th and 21st centuries. www.fine-art-doebele.de

20. 11. Auction Team Breker, Köln: Scientific and Technical; Office Antiques; and Toys and Doll Automats. www.Breker.com

22. 11. Ketterer Kunst, Hamburg: Maritime and North German Art; Valuable Books, Manuscripts, Autographs, Decorative Graphics. www.KettererKunst.de

 

December 2010

2.-4. 12. Auktionshaus Kaupp, Sulzburg: Art Handcrafts; Jewelry and Watches; Paintings, Antiques & Furniture; Modern and Contemporary Art. www.Kaupp.de

3.-4. 12. Leipziger Münzhandlung und Auktion Heidrun Höhn, Leipzig. www.Muenzen-Leipzig.de

4. 12. Ketterer Kunst, Munich: Modern Art; After 1945/Contemporary Art. www.KettererKunst.de

4. 12. Schmidt Kunstauktionen, Dresden: Artwork of the 17th to 21st Centuries. www.Schmidt-Auktionen.de

6.12. Sotheby’s, Zurich: Swiss Art. www.sothebys.com

7.12. Quittenbaum Kustauktionen, Munich: Studio Glass; Highlights of Design History VII – Table Culture. www.Quittenbaum.de

9.12. Von Zezschwitz Kunst und Design, Munich: Italien Design. www. von-zezschwitz.de

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Austrian painter Egon Schiele photographed by Anton Josef Trčka, Vienna, 1914. Vintage silver gelatin print signed and dated on negative. Estimated price 50,000-60,000 Euro. ($69,800-$83,760). Photo courtesy WestLicht.

Austrian painter Egon Schiele photographed by Anton Josef Trčka, Vienna, 1914. Vintage silver gelatin print signed and dated on negative. Estimated price 50,000-60,000 Euro. ($69,800-$83,760). Photo courtesy WestLicht.

The California National Historic Trail Interpretive Center located near Elko, Nevada, U.S. Bureau of Land Management photo.

Five bronzes unveiled at Nevada historic trail center

The California National Historic Trail Interpretive Center located near Elko, Nevada, U.S. Bureau of Land Management photo.

The California National Historic Trail Interpretive Center located near Elko, Nevada, U.S. Bureau of Land Management photo.

ELKO, Nev. (AP) – A depiction of a pioneer woman cradling a baby was one of five life-sized bronze statues modeled on Old West pioneers unveiled at the California National Historic Trail Interpretive Center in Nevada.

The Elko Daily Free Press reported Monday that artist DiAnne Cooper was among officials at a weekend ceremony at the museum due to open in May 2012 off an Interstate 80 exit eight miles west of Elko.

The newspaper reports the Saturday event was part of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s National Landscape Conservation System.

The figures in the facility plaza also include a mountain man guide, an adventurer in a suit, a grizzly man and his son.

Cooper says they were modeled on an 1860s-era painting.

___

Information from: Elko Daily Free Press, http://www.elkodaily.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-10-26-10 0705EDT

 

Judge: Free speech protects Amazon buyers’ data

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – Lists that identify the books, music and movies individual customers bought from online retailer Amazon.com Inc. are protected from North Carolina tax collectors, a federal judge has ruled.

Amazon said in a lawsuit it filed in April in its hometown of Seattle that disclosing the names, addresses and purchases of its customers as requested by the North Carolina Revenue Department would harm anyone who may have bought controversial books or movies.

U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman ruled late Monday that the First Amendment protects a buyer from the government demanding to know the books, music, and audiovisual products they’ve bought.

Amazon and the American Civil Liberties Union, which later joined the case, “have established that the First Amendment protects the disclosure of individual’s reading, listening, and viewing habits,” Pechman wrote.

At stake are potentially millions of dollars in taxes that North Carolina contends Amazon was responsible for collecting for years before a state law was changed last summer.

A Revenue Department spokeswoman declined comment Tuesday while its attorneys reviewed the ruling. The agency argued previously it doesn’t care what Amazon customers read or view, just whether they paid sales taxes on their online purchases.

North Carolina requires residents to pay taxes on online purchases if buying the same item in a physical store would result in a sales tax. But out-of-state retailers can’t be forced to collect North Carolina’s tax if they have no physical presence in the state.

The dispute is over the state’s definition of whether Amazon had a North Carolina presence.

Last year, state legislators passed a law making Amazon responsible for collecting sales taxes because it had a network of local affiliates – North Carolina residents who linked to products on their blogs, promoted Web shopping deals and offered coupons.

Before the change was adopted, Amazon cut its ties to those North Carolina affiliates. The company also stopped working with affiliates in Rhode Island and Colorado because of collection-enforcement laws passed in those states.

North Carolina’s tax agency decided to pursue Amazon for taxes it argues should have been collected during the years those affiliates were operating, even before the new law was passed.

Lawyers for the tax agency said either Amazon or its customers owe North Carolina $50 million in sales and use taxes on Internet purchases.

Since the recession slashed tax collections, states have been stepping up efforts to collect from online retailers.

In 2008, New York became the first state to treat local affiliates as enough of state presence to require retailers to collect sales taxes. Lawmakers in Iowa, New Mexico, Vermont and Virginia have considered similar laws, according to the Tax Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based research group.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-10-26-10 1047EDT