Glazed terra-cotta produced the Richfield Building’s unique black and gold color scheme. The gold color was gold dust, pulverized and applied to the terra-cotta in a transparent glazing solution. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

L.A. historian wonders where Richfield Building’s angels went

Glazed terra-cotta produced the Richfield Building’s unique black and gold color scheme. The gold color was gold dust, pulverized and applied to the terra-cotta in a transparent glazing solution. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Glazed terra-cotta produced the Richfield Building’s unique black and gold color scheme. The gold color was gold dust, pulverized and applied to the terra-cotta in a transparent glazing solution. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

LOS ANGELES (AP) – The population of winged guardians in the City of Angels is not what it was.

A downtown Los Angeles resident wants to find out what happened to dozens of terra-cotta angel sculptures that once adorned a landmark downtown building that was demolished in 1969.

The Richfield Building, a black and gold Art-Deco tower, which was built in 1929 and served as the headquarters for Richfield Oil Co., was festooned with 40 golden angels wearing roman helmets and breastplates. The 10-foot-tall majestic sentries gazed down on the city from the 13-floor building.

When office tower at 555 S. Flower St. was torn down to make way for a generic-looking high-rise complex, the angels were removed and offered for sale for $100, and one of them was bought by an Orange County family.

Local historian and urban anthropologist Eric Lynxwiler heard the family was selling the sculpture, so he bought it for $2,500 and attempted to bring it back to his downtown loft in a truck.

“I ended up hiring a crane and a forklift,” Lynxwiler told the Los Angeles Times. “The crane operator weighed it and found it was 1 1/2 tons, so I had to have a special base made to hold it. Altogether, it ended up costing $10,000.”

Lynxwiler, 37, wants to know what happened to the other angels. He speculates that some could have ended up amid the rubble from the demolished building that was used to construct Los Angeles-area freeways.

A pair of ornate elevator doors from the Richfield Building were saved and incorporated into one of the high-rise ARCO Plaza towers now standing on the site. The University of California, Santa Barbara, has four of the old building’s front door ornaments.

___

Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-WS-12-29-10 1216EST

 

Emeralds and diamonds form the buds and leaves respectively on this 18K white gold bracelet. Estimate: $8,075-$9,100. Image courtesy of Auktionshaus Gut Bernstorf.

Mammoth skull rare find at Gut Bernstorf auction Jan. 8

Emeralds and diamonds form the buds and leaves respectively on this 18K white gold bracelet. Estimate: $8,075-$9,100. Image courtesy of Auktionshaus Gut Bernstorf.

Emeralds and diamonds form the buds and leaves respectively on this 18K white gold bracelet. Estimate: $8,075-$9,100. Image courtesy of Auktionshaus Gut Bernstorf.

KRANZBERG, Germany – Auktionshaus Gut Bernstorf will hold its Great Fine Arts and Antiquities auction on Jan. 8 at the gallery near Munich. The auction will begin at 1 p.m. MEZ (Central European Time, 7 a.m. Eastern). Internet live bidding will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.

Auctioneer Michael Lehrberger said the auction is in “very positive resonance to our first two auctions in our new established auction-rooms in Bernstorf Estate.”

For the upcoming auction Lehrberger has gathered 581 lots of nice, old, surprising and rare pieces from all over the world. The real “crown jewel” of this auction is the skull with the two tusks of a mammoth from the Pliozaen to Holozaen period. This rarity was excavated in Siberia and after that professionally restored by museum experts. All legal documents are with the skull, one of only a few such pieces known worldwide.

The auction will also feature fine arts, strange rarities, antiques and beautiful collectibles.

“Give yourself the chance to see, feel end enjoy the rememberances and the relics of an almost forgotten world,” said Lehrberger, adding, “It’s a real pleasure for us to welcome you in our house, to know that you enjoyed your time in the auction and we feel really great to see you back again.”

Previews at the auction house will be Jan. 5 and the morning of the sale.

For details visit Auktionshaus Gut Bernstorf’s website: www.gutbernstorf.de or call +49-8166-9932-11.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAucvtioneers.com.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

In Memoriam: Ky. artist Stephen Irwin, 51, found dead in gallery

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – A Kentucky artist whose work has been displayed in galleries across the globe has been found dead at the artists’ collective where he worked.

A fellow artist found 51-year-old Stephen Irwin of Louisville dead on Monday at Zephyr Gallery, where he worked.

Chris Radtke, who found Irwin, told The Courier-Journal that “a light has gone out” with Irwin’s death.

Irwin, a native of Vine Grove, Ky., and one-time student at Murray State University, has garnered attention with group and solo exhibits in galleries in New York, New Orleans, Berlin, London and Munich.

His work is scheduled to be shown in a group exhibit opening in January at Galerie Stefan Roepke in Cologne, Germany.

Funeral arrangements have not been made yet. The cause of death hasn’t been determined, however, Irwin reportedly had a history of heart disease.

___

Information from: The Courier-Journal,

http://www.courier-journal.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-12-29-10 0838EST

 

 

 

The site of the current archaeological dig is in the vicinity of Monk’s Mound, the largest of the Cahokia Mounds in southwest Illinois. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Archaeologists driven to solve mystery of abandoned city

The site of the current archaeological dig is in the vicinity of Monk’s Mound,  the largest of the Cahokia Mounds in southwest Illinois. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The site of the current archaeological dig is in the vicinity of Monk’s Mound, the largest of the Cahokia Mounds in southwest Illinois. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. (AP) – Archaeologists who have uncovered the remains of a prehistoric city beneath what is now East St. Louis are trying to unravel why that ancient city was abandoned while another one just to the east managed to survive two more centuries.

Archaeologists believe Native Americans abandoned the city of roughly 3,000 or more people around the year 1200, some 200 years before a bigger settlement at nearby Cahokia Mounds ended inexplicably.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Tuesday that the East St. Louis settlement appeared to have been ravaged by fire in the late 1100s, although the cause of that blaze isn’t clear. Joe Galloy, coordinator at the Illinois State Archaeological Survey’s American Bottom Field Station in Wood River, said an attack from outside, rioting or a ritual burning are among theories for the fire’s origin, though archaeologists hope to pinpoint during the dig.

Archaeologists have been working the site since 2008, in advance of construction of an Interstate 70 bridge across the Mississippi River.

Galloy called the archaeological dig near the site of the old St. Louis National Stockyards “an unprecedented look at a Mississippian city” and perhaps the most significant archaeology of any kind under way in the country. About 50 people are working full-time on the effort.

“We’re digging up ancient urban neighborhoods,” he said. “It’s an unprecedented look at a Mississippian city.” When finished, more land will have been excavated than at the internationally known Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, near Collinsville.

Cahokia Mounds was the administrative center for the mound-building Mississippians, who flourished from around 700 to around 1400 over what is now the Midwest and Southeast. In 1100, Galloy said, Cahokia Mounds had roughly 15,000 to 20,000 people; the United States would have no city as populous until Philadelphia in the late 1700s.

Galloy said Cahokia Mounds, the East St. Louis settlements and similar mounds in St. Louis were in near alignment. The only surviving mounds are in the Cahokia Mounds state historic site, with others on both sides of the river long lost to development.

At Cahokia Mounds and many other archaeological sites, land intentionally is left undisturbed for future excavation. But exploration in the path of the bridge needs to be finished in the next two or three years or the opportunity is lost.

Last year, Galloy said, a 3 1/2-inch figurine of a woman holding a cup or dipper was found near a manure drain installed at the stockyards more than a century ago. Workers have found axes and arrow points, along with pieces of pottery.

None of the findings may be a “game changer” greatly altering beliefs about the Mississippians, Galloy said, though he said the project is producing new information against which to evaluate those beliefs. He said researchers will be analyzing the findings for years.

“We’re still in the beginning of the way to understanding,” he said.

___

Information from: St. Louis Post-Dispatch,

http://www.stltoday.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-12-28-10 1156EST

 

Made by Anna Pottery in Illinois, this 9-inch-high stoneware snake jug is inscribed ‘Centennial 1876 Kirkpatrick Anna Pottery Anna, Ill.’ It carries a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Anna snake jug, Wedgwood bonanza to highlight Skinner sale Jan. 7-8

Made by Anna Pottery in Illinois, this 9-inch-high stoneware snake jug is inscribed ‘Centennial 1876 Kirkpatrick Anna Pottery Anna, Ill.’ It carries a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Made by Anna Pottery in Illinois, this 9-inch-high stoneware snake jug is inscribed ‘Centennial 1876 Kirkpatrick Anna Pottery Anna, Ill.’ It carries a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

BOSTON – Skinner Inc. will host an auction of European Furniture and Decorative Arts in two sessions on Friday, Jan. 7, and Saturday, Jan. 8, in its Boston gallery. The first of four European Furniture and Decorative Arts sales Skinner will host in 2011, this sale will offer more than 1,000 lots. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Approximately 500 lots of America and English pottery and porcelain will be offered, highlighted by nearly 400 lots of assorted Wedgwood wares. Featured in the sale are selections from the Benton and Beverly Rosen Collection, the Ron and Carol Glynn Collection, the Lotwin Collection, the stock of Earl Buckman and pieces from a private New York collection. Spanning the past three centuries, the selection will include a wide variety of jasper and dry body wares, studio pots and a large and varied assortment of Keith Murray wares. It will provide this auction something for every level of Wedgwood collector.

Also included in the sale is a nice assortment of wares manufactured by Minton, Worcester and Doulton as well as examples of Picasso pottery.

One notable highlight is a rare Anna Pottery snake jug from Illinos. This is a fantastic example of the imagination and exuberance of American pottery in the 19th century. Anna Pottery was run by the brothers Cornwall and W. Wallace Kirkpatrick in Anna, Union County, Ill., between 1859-1896. Their whimsical, imaginative and wonderfully bizarre creations were displayed at various venues, including international exhibitions such as the Philadelphia Centennial in 1876, and reflect the cultural and political nature of a mid-late American state. Anna pieces rarely appear at auction. Lot 3 is estimated at $20,000 to $30,000.

Also of note is a Vezzi teapot, a very early piece of European porcelain. Examples like this are seldom seen outside of museums. Not only is it an example of the infancy of porcelain produced in Europe, it is also a rare survival from a Venetian factory. Vezzi was the first Italian factories to make hard-paste porcelain, though the company was short-lived, founded in 1720 and closed in 1727 when it went bankrupt. At the time, the quest for producing true porcelain like that made in Asia was a frenzied one in Europe. Lot 632 is estimated at $20,000 to $30,000.

Other highlights include lot 680, a French Art Nouveau carved walnut sideboard attributed to Eugene Gaillard (1862-1933), a famous Art Nouveau designer. This piece displays classic Art Nouveau styling, with its use of sinuous, whiplash curves and naturalistic elements. It is estimated at $3,000 to $5,000.

Also up for bid is an Austrian cold-painted bronze figural boudoir lamp, lot 991, designed as cast by Franz Xavier Bergman, one of the most famous Austrian producers of these types of whimsical bronzes. This piece bears Bergman’s mark of the letter B within a stylized vase and shows incredible detail. The lamp is estimated at $2,000 to $4,000.

Previews for the auction will be held on Thursday, Jan. 6, from noon to 8 p.m. and Friday, Jan. 7, from noon to 8 p.m. Illustrated catalog #2532B is available by mail for $35 ($42 for foreign requests) from the subscription department at 508-970-3240. It is also available at the gallery for $32.

For details visit the website www.skinnerinc.com or call 508-970-3000.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAucvtioneers.com.

 

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Three Wedgwood Keith Murray design matte straw slip glazed items, circa 1935, two fluted vases, and a water pitcher. Estimate:  $400-$600. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Three Wedgwood Keith Murray design matte straw slip glazed items, circa 1935, two fluted vases, and a water pitcher. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Vezzi Porcelain bronze mounted teapot and cover, Venice, Italy, circa 1725, with molded acanthus leaf borders and paneled sides polychrome enamel decorated with flowers, green enamel trim lines, 5 inches high. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Vezzi Porcelain bronze mounted teapot and cover, Venice, Italy, circa 1725, with molded acanthus leaf borders and paneled sides polychrome enamel decorated with flowers, green enamel trim lines, 5 inches high. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Bergman cold-painted bronze figure, Austria, early 20th century, depicting a man kneeling on a prayer rug, stamped bag mark, 5 inches high. Estimate $1,000-$1,500. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Bergman cold-painted bronze figure, Austria, early 20th century, depicting a man kneeling on a prayer rug, stamped bag mark, 5 inches high. Estimate $1,000-$1,500. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

A partial sticker from the 1926 Philadelphia World’s Fair is on this 24 1/2-inch-tall Royal Copenhagen vase decorated with a cow motif. It is expected to bring $1,200-$1,500. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

World’s Fair Royal Copenhagen vase to star at Michaan’s sale Jan. 2

A partial sticker from the 1926 Philadelphia World’s Fair is on this 24 1/2-inch-tall Royal Copenhagen vase decorated with a cow motif. It is expected to bring $1,200-$1,500. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

A partial sticker from the 1926 Philadelphia World’s Fair is on this 24 1/2-inch-tall Royal Copenhagen vase decorated with a cow motif. It is expected to bring $1,200-$1,500. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Michaan’s Auction will begin the New Year with a spectacular sale of more than 900 lots of fine art, jewelry, decorative art, furniture, vintage clothing, coins and Asian items. The 900-lot auction will begin Sunday, Jan. 2 at 10 a.m. Pacific. Internet live bidding will be facilitated by Live LiveAuctioneers.

One highly unusual item is a 25-inch blue and white Royal Copenhagen porcelain vase decorated with cows in a landscape by Danish artist Gottred Andrew Andersen Rode. The vase was commissioned as one of Denmark’s entries into the 1926 World’s Fair. Held in Philadelphia as the Sesqui-Centennial Expo, the event celebrated the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

Michaan’s jewelry department will also showcase 20th-century designers: works by artists Robert Lee Morris, Georg Jensen, Margo DeTaxco, Bent Gabrielsen for Georg Jensen, Anna Greta Eker, Susan Cummings and Viviana Torun will complement the more traditional fine jewelry. The couture department features several fine custom tailored evening gowns, day dresses and blouses from the 1930s and 1940s.

Several works of fine Art Deco sculpture by Berkeley, California artist Warren DeWitt Cheney will be offered for the first time in over 60 years. These stone and terra cotta sculptures are scale model studies for Cheney’s monumental architectural work. Works by this artist are rare; he stopped working as a sculptor after World War II and started a new career as a psychologist. Another exciting offering is a collection of drawings from life of Isadora Duncan by Abraham Walkowitz.

The coin department has a small but select group of early U.S. gold coins, while the furniture and decorations division will offer American, English and Continental sterling and porcelain; contemporary American art glass; bronze and marble sculpture; and some modern and traditional furniture.

Established in 2002, Michaan’s Auctions is located at 2751 Todd St. in Alameda, CA 94501.

For details visit Michaan’s website at www.michaans.com or call 510-740-0220.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAucvtioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


George Jensen, Bent Gabrielsen amethyst, sterling silver pendant-necklace, Denmark, circa 1928, Estimate: Estimate:  $300-$500. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

George Jensen, Bent Gabrielsen amethyst, sterling silver pendant-necklace, Denmark, circa 1928, Estimate: Estimate: $300-$500. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Warren Dewitt Cheney (American 1907-1979), ‘opus 5,’ Alaska marble, 1931, 7 x 4 x 8 inches, in excellent condition, mounted to a painted wood base. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Warren Dewitt Cheney (American 1907-1979), ‘opus 5,’ Alaska marble, 1931, 7 x 4 x 8 inches, in excellent condition, mounted to a painted wood base. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Abraham Walkowitz (Russian Federation, 1878-1965), ‘Portrait of Isadora Duncan,’ ink on paper. 11 x 8 1/2 inches. Signed lower center. Estimate: $500-$700. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Abraham Walkowitz (Russian Federation, 1878-1965), ‘Portrait of Isadora Duncan,’ ink on paper. 11 x 8 1/2 inches. Signed lower center. Estimate: $500-$700. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Two Donald Carlson art glass vases, iridescent glass with leaf motif, signed and numbered on base, heights 5 3/4 inches and 7 1/2 inches. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Two Donald Carlson art glass vases, iridescent glass with leaf motif, signed and numbered on base, heights 5 3/4 inches and 7 1/2 inches. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

The house depicted in Grant Wood’s masterpiece ‘American Gothic’ is in Eldon, Iowa. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Mural may have previewed Grant Wood’s ‘American Gothic’

The house depicted in Grant Wood’s masterpiece ‘American Gothic’ is in Eldon, Iowa. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The house depicted in Grant Wood’s masterpiece ‘American Gothic’ is in Eldon, Iowa. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) – When Grant Wood was commissioned by Omaha hotel magnate Eugene Eppley to paint a series of murals in 1927 decorating the walls of two meeting rooms in Eppley’s Hotel Chieftain in downtown Council Bluffs, he was a relatively unknown Iowa artist.

Three years later, in 1930, Wood gained national and international fame with the unveiling of American Gothic, his most widely recognized work.

An Omaha art consultant believes that one segment of the mural Wood painted for the Hotel Chieftain’s Corn Room – a segment now owned by US Bank and put on loan to the Bluffs Arts Council – “previews the American Gothic.”

That segment of the mural, along with two others owned by the bank and loaned to the Bluffs Arts Council, was hung recently in the lobby of the Pottawattamie County Courthouse.

The 29- by 37.5-inch segment, which Wood and his assistant, Edgar Britton, had created on the north wall of the Corn Room is “completely identifiable with the artist,” according to Eileen Brown of Brown’s Art Consultants in Omaha.

“It previews the American Gothic, being rendered in a very cubist, stacked style and could not be mistaken for the work of any other artist, even if the signature was separated from the painting,” Brown wrote in her appraisal of the segment.

In visiting with Dick Miller, a former president of the Bluffs Arts Council and a driving force behind the current effort to collect and display the remaining segments of Wood’s Corn Room mural, about the US Bank segment, Brown commented she could see Wood “envisioning American Gothic” – “it was in his mind.”

The house seen in American Gothic is located in Eldon, and was a structure first seen by Wood in August 1930 on a car ride with John Sharp, an 18-year-old Eldon native and aspiring artist.

Wood’s trip to Eldon was part of an “artistic outreach” arranged by Edward Rowan, the director of the Little Gallery in Cedar Rapids. His goal was to promote fine arts in smaller communities.

In his book, American Gothic, author Steven Biel noted that Rowan, speaking at the American Federation of Arts convention in May 1931, commented, “It is noteworthy to recall that the particular house which prompted Mr. Wood to create his American Gothic was discovered by him on a visit to our Eldon experiment.”

But Rowan added that the idea for American Gothic had been “revolving in the artist’s mind for several years – but needed the particular impetus which he found in Eldon.”

And, like Rowan, Brown is confident the idea that had been “revolving in the artist’s mind for several years” is present in an early form in the 1927 Corn Room mural segment.

___

Information from: The Daily Nonpareil,

http://www.nonpareilonline.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-12-26-10 0102EST

Crime novelist Patricia Cornwell. Image used with permission by Palmtree3000, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Novelist Patricia Cornwell gifts rare letters to Colonial Williamsburg

Crime novelist Patricia Cornwell. Image used with permission by Palmtree3000, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Crime novelist Patricia Cornwell. Image used with permission by Palmtree3000, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (AP) – Two letters from the early 17th century expressing Spain’s fears of the new English settlement at Jamestown have been given to Colonial Williamsburg.

The letters written by Spanish King Phillip III were donated by best-selling crime novelist Patricia Cornwell.

The Richmond-based writer has been an avid follower of the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeological project for many years. Cornwell acquired the historic letters several years ago at the New York auction of an old Spanish family archive.

Officials say the Spain was concerned the English would create a base in Virginia to attack Spanish ships in the Atlantic Ocean and raid as far as the Pacific Ocean as well.

The letters will be kept at Colonial Williamsburg’s John D. Rockefeller Library.

___

Information from: Daily Press, http://www.dailypress.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-12-25-10 1000EST

 

In Memoriam: John Warhola, brother of Andy Warhol

ROCHESTER, Pa. (AP) – John Warhola, the older brother who helped raise pop art icon Andy Warhol and later helped establish the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, has died.

Warhola’s son, Donald, says his father was 85 when he died on Christmas Eve after battling pneumonia in a Pittsburgh hospital.

John Warhola was one of three founding members of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and was the group’s vice president for 20 years. The foundation established the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.

After their father died in 1942, John Warhola was tasked with raising his younger brother, Andy, and making sure he attended college. Andy Warhol died at 58 in 1987 after complications from gall bladder surgery.

John Warhola’s funeral is Wednesday and he’ll be buried in a family plot at St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery in Bethel Park.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-12-27-10 1629EST

 

 

Edmund Dulac (French, British, 1882-1953) painted ‘Lady in the Garden’ in 1917. The framed painting is expected to sell for $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

Texas-size antiques to star in Austin Auction’s Jan. 2 sale

Edmund Dulac (French, British, 1882-1953) painted ‘Lady in the Garden’ in 1917. The framed painting is expected to sell for $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

Edmund Dulac (French, British, 1882-1953) painted ‘Lady in the Garden’ in 1917. The framed painting is expected to sell for $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

AUSTIN, Texas – Austin Auction Gallery will start the year in spectacular style Sunday, Jan. 2, with an auction of antiques from around the world including period furniture, French and English long-case clocks, original paintings, fine jewelry and watches, Chinese and Korean scrolls, and antique firearms. The auction, which starts at 1 p.m. Central, will consist of approximately 470 lots. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

In addition to several pieces of 18th-century furniture from Taunton, Mass., the sale will feature Anglo-Indian furniture including two fabulous tester beds, English Georgian and Victorian furniture, Spanish Colonial-style furniture and provincial French furniture.

One of the highlights is an American Victorian mahogany sofa, circa 1890, possibly R.J. Horner, Horner Brothers, New York. The sofa has a pierced crest flanked by winged griffins all on the back rail, supported by turned ribbed columns. The arms have detail of carved winged dolphins each resting on twin ribbed columns set on blocks. In later upholstery, the sofa is 78 inches wide and has a $2,500-$5,000 estimate.

Historic Americana in the sale includes an 1864 Harvard yearbook illustrated with real photosthat include Robert Todd Lincoln, eldest son of Abraham Lincoln. The hardbound volume with loose and detached images has an estimate of $1,500-$3,000.

Monumental 19th-century pieces include a nearly 5-foot-tall Italian gilt metal and crystal chandelier, a Spanish Alfonsino mahogany bookcase and an Italian marble statue of Dionysus, the Greek god stature of the wine.

“Lady in the Garden,” a painting by Edmund Dulac (French, British, 1882-1953), is representative of the fine art in the sale. The 17-inch by 12 1/2-inch gouache, gold and silver paint on paper is dated 1917 and has a $12,000-$18,000 estimate.

For details check Austin Auction Gallery’s website at www.austinauction.com or call 512-258-5479.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Italian gilt metal and crystal chandelier, 19th century, 12 scrolled branches set with 12 lights and a large faceted crystal ball hanging from the center, 58 inches high. Estimate: $7,000-$12,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

Italian gilt metal and crystal chandelier, 19th century, 12 scrolled branches set with 12 lights and a large faceted crystal ball hanging from the center, 58 inches high. Estimate: $7,000-$12,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

Spanish Alfonsino mahogany bookcase, circa 1890, a carved anchor, barrel and trunk rest at the center of the split pediment with carved globes at either side, 121 inches high, 70 inches wide, 20 inches deep. Provenance: From the estate of a prominent family, Madrid, Spain, the patriarch, a sea captain, had the cabinet custom made. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

Spanish Alfonsino mahogany bookcase, circa 1890, a carved anchor, barrel and trunk rest at the center of the split pediment with carved globes at either side, 121 inches high, 70 inches wide, 20 inches deep. Provenance: From the estate of a prominent family, Madrid, Spain, the patriarch, a sea captain, had the cabinet custom made. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

American Victorian mahogany sofa, circa 1890, possibly Horner Brothers, New York. Estimate: $2,500-$5,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

American Victorian mahogany sofa, circa 1890, possibly Horner Brothers, New York. Estimate: $2,500-$5,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

talian Neoclassical Carrara marble statue of Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, Naples, mid-18th century, 60 inches high, affixed to a black granite bases. Estimate: $10.000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.

talian Neoclassical Carrara marble statue of Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, Naples, mid-18th century, 60 inches high, affixed to a black granite bases. Estimate: $10.000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery.