Ginny and Ben Smith, Maison de France Antiques. Image courtesy of Marberger Farm Antique Show.

Marburger Farm Antique Show a top dog at spring fair in Round Top

Ginny and Ben Smith, Maison de France Antiques. Image courtesy of Marberger Farm Antique Show.

Ginny and Ben Smith, Maison de France Antiques. Image courtesy of Marburger Farm Antique Show.

ROUND TOP, Texas – The Marburger Farm Antique Show is going to the dogs – and the designers and the dads and the moms and the kids – and to anyone up for a fun way to feather their nest. The spring show opens Tuesday, March 29, and runs through Saturday, April 2.

Of the nearly two dozen antique shows listed on the Round Top Chamber of Commerce website Marberger Farm Antique Show is the only event that opens on March 29. Visit www.roundtop.org for a comprehensive schedule of shows in the Round Top area.

“When a show is dog-friendly,” said exhibitor Rebecca Looten of Monsoon Imports, “You know it’s also shopper-friendly.” Her yellow lab Marley will greet shoppers from one of the dog beds that Looten creates from antique altars. Buying in Rajasthstan, India, for nearly a decade, Looten offers wooden and stone artifacts such as carved deities, rain cisterns, architectural fragments and marble serving platters. Looten plans to fill platters with refreshments during Marburger Farm’s benefit evening for Texas Children’s Hospital on March 29.

Whether you bring your pooch, your pal or your kids, Marburger Farm is just plain bliss. “Spring is a luscious time in Texas,” said show co-owner Ashley Ferguson. “The pastures are full of bluebonnets and baby cows. People from all over America throw off winter and come looking for garden antiques and furniture for indoor-outdoor entertaining. Our goal is to have the best antique show in the nation, which includes giving shoppers the best memories and inspiration and enjoyment.”

With over 350 dealers on 43 acres, Marburger Farm consists of a not-so-small world of its own. Ten super-size tents and 12 historic buildings spill over with antiques from French to Fifties.

“One thing that makes for a great show is happy dealers,” said show co-owner Rick McConn. “Even with the huge truckloads of antiques coming in, we do all that we can to reduce the stress of setup. Then we do all we can to enhance the event for everyone.” This spring look for three food and beverage pavilions by Austin caterer Sterling Affairs, plus a bar in the Blacksmith Shop serving wine, ice-cold beer and “Marburitas.” An on-site shipper, free Wi-Fi, comfort stations, free parking and a parking shuttle service all add up to a stress-free event for shoppers too. “And we are packed,” said McConn, “with bloggers and shoppers coming from around the nation.”

But bluebonnets and bloggers aside, the main attraction is the stuff. What’s coming?

Ender Tasci of Elephant Walk Antiques in Orlando, Fla., will arrive with a collection of 17th- to 18th-century trunks from Spain, plus a pair of large 18th-century gilded fragments from Italy. “The minute I leave Texas, I start missing Texas,” said Tasci. “For six months, I am living and breathing Texas to get ready for the next Marburger.” Being ready this time includes transporting to Marburger Farm all the fixtures from an old wine shop in the south of France, including wooden work counters for use as buffets and 9-foot-tall wine storage cabinets for use as cupboards and armoires.

Al Linder of Northfield, Minn., also thinks big. “I’m bringing a primitive barn cupola, a full set of windmill blades, 10 feet across, and a 9-foot-long quartersawn oak workbench for a fantastic kitchen island.”

Why make the long trek to Texas? “In other states,” said Linder, “people look at these big industrial pieces and say to their friend, ‘What are you going to do with that?’ In Texas, people say, ‘If you don’t buy it, I will.’ I always look forward to Marburger Farm.”

Don Orwig of Corunna, Ind., agrees. “Spring at Marburger Farm is our top show of the year. We plan on doing a lot of business,” said Orwig, who will unload a box truck of industrial antiques, store counters and advertising signs. He’ll have factory pieces refurbished for homes, such as worktables to be used as dining tables and bookshelves made from factory flooring with metal sides from old iron bridges. Also arriving with Orwig will be a set of 70 matching bistro chairs that he bought from a restaurant in Paris.

Paris may never be the same after the winter shopping maneuvers of a band of Marburger Farm dealers. “We’re going to shop our hearts out,” said Stephanie Talley of Fluff Antiques. “We’re all looking for wonderful smalls, art, textiles, jewelry and anything eccentric that we can get back to Marburger Farm.” Of the shopping gang, jewelry dealer Janet Waldrop of Skip 2 My Lou Antiques is the most experienced at shopping in France. “Janet keeps coaching us on how to shop without being conspicuous foreigners,” said Talley with a laugh. “But just wait till that Texan opens her mouth!”

Single-minded shopping, months of preparation and many miles characterize over 350 Marburger Farm exhibitors who will alight near a herd of longhorns with everything from investment antiques from Sweden to mid-century modern antiques for new collectors. In the mix will be creative and mind-boggling displays in each booth, making for room settings of visual wonder.

Peg Van Dyne of French Vanilla Antiques will bring her new golden retriever, Emma, who color-coordinates with the neutral and calming tones of Van Dyne’s always scrumptious booth. “I’m starting with a clean slate and a light palette,” said Van Dyne. “I’m going on a big buying trip and coming straight to Marburger Farm full of surprises.”

So come for surprises, for the sunshine and for the stuff. The Marburger Farm Antique Show opens for early buying with $25 admission on Tuesday, March 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., when regular $10 admission begins. Tuesday will have extended shopping hours until 7 p.m., which will directly benefit the Texas Children’s Hospital, and a portion of the entire show’s proceeds will benefit Texas Children’s Hospital. Admission is good all week, with the show running on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday, April 2, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free for children 15 and younger and dogs on a leash are always welcome.

See information on vendors, travel, maps, lodging, shipping and special events at roundtop-marburger.com or call Rick McConn at 800-999-2148 or Ashley Ferguson at 800-947-5799.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Ginny and Ben Smith, Maison de France Antiques. Image courtesy of Marberger Farm Antique Show.

Ginny and Ben Smith, Maison de France Antiques. Image courtesy of Marberger Farm Antique Show.

Gary Bonner, Portobello Antiques. Image courtesy of Marberger Farm Antique Show.

Gary Bonner, Portobello Antiques. Image courtesy of Marburger Farm Antique Show.

Luan and Jerry Watkins, Sniktaw Antiques. Image courtesy of Marberger Farm Antique Show.

Luan and Jerry Watkins, Sniktaw Antiques. Image courtesy of Marburger Farm Antique Show.

One of the finest finds from the bay of Aboukir is a Graeco-Egyptian product of the Ptolemaic era – a statue of a Ptolemaic queen in black granite. The 7-foot-tall statue is most likely a representation of Cleopatra II or Cleopatra III, dressed as goddess Isis. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

Egypt’s Cleopatra exhibit makes U.S. debut Feb. 18 in Cincinnati

One of the finest finds from the bay of Aboukir is a Graeco-Egyptian product of the Ptolemaic era – a statue of a Ptolemaic queen in black granite. The 7-foot-tall statue is most likely a representation of Cleopatra II or Cleopatra III, dressed as goddess Isis. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

One of the finest finds from the bay of Aboukir is a Graeco-Egyptian product of the Ptolemaic era – a statue of a Ptolemaic queen in black granite. The 7-foot-tall statue is most likely a representation of Cleopatra II or Cleopatra III, dressed as goddess Isis. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

CINCINNATI — The world of Cleopatra VII, which has been lost to the sea and sand for nearly 2,000 years, will surface at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal on Feb. 18, 2011 when “Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt” opens its doors.

Cincinnati was selected as the second stop in the world for the exhibition, which will remain on view through Sept. 5. The exhibition features nearly 150 artifacts from Cleopatra’s time and takes visitors inside the present-day search for the elusive queen, which extends from the sands of Egypt to the depths of the Bay of Aboukir near Alexandria.

The exhibition is organized by National Geographic and Arts and Exhibitions International, with cooperation from the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities and the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology (IEASM). It features statuary, jewelry, daily items, coins and religious tokens that archaeologists have uncovered from the time surrounding Cleopatra’s rule, all of which are visiting the United States for the first time. An original papyrus document from Cleopatra’s time containing an inscription that scientists believe was written in Cleopatra’s own hand will also be on display.

After Egypt succumbed to Roman forces and Cleopatra famously took her own life following the suicide of her lover Mark Antony, the Romans attempted to wipe her legacy from the pages of history. Cleopatra thus has remained one of history’s greatest enigmas, and her final resting place is one of Egypt’s great unsolved mysteries. The artifacts in this exhibition are woven into the story of her rule and life in ancient Egypt during her dynasty (Ptolemaic period). The story of her life and time unfolds in a dramatic setting with high-definition multimedia and original soundscapes. Each guest receives an audio tour with admission that provides a rich background to the featured artifacts.

Visitors to the exhibition follow the modern-day parallel stories of two ongoing expeditions being led in Egypt by Dr. Zahi Hawass, Egypt’s pre-eminent archaeologist and secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, and Franck Goddio, French underwater archaeologist and director of IEASM. Goddio’s search has resulted in one of the most ambitious underwater expeditions ever undertaken, which has uncovered Cleopatra’s royal palace and the two ancient cities of Canopus and Heracleion, which until 10 years ago had been lost beneath the sea after a series of earthquakes and tidal waves nearly 2,000 years ago.

On land, Hawass and a team of archaeologists are searching for the tomb of the ill-fated lovers Cleopatra and Mark Antony. Never-before-seen artifacts referencing Cleopatra, excavated by Hawass’ team at the temple of Taposiris Magna, about 30 miles west of Alexandria, are featured.

“Queen Cleopatra has captured the hearts of people all over the world. Remembered as a beautiful, charismatic and powerful woman, many things about her life are still shrouded in mystery. In 2005, we began to search for the tomb where she was buried with her lover, Mark Antony, which we believe was in an ancient temple near Alexandria,” said Hawass. “So far, we have found coins, statues and even shafts that are leading us closer to what would be one of the most important archaeological discoveries in history. This exhibition, which includes objects found in our current excavations, will give the American people the chance to learn about our search for Cleopatra, and will share with them the magic of this fascinating queen.”

The exhibition also showcases artifacts from Goddio’s continuing underwater search off the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, begun in 1992. Goddio’s remarkable finds bring visitors inside his search for the lost world of Cleopatra, including remnants from the grand palace where she ruled. Visitors also see underwater footage and photos of Goddio’s team retrieving artifacts from the ocean and bringing them to the surface for the first time in centuries.

Cleopatra, the last great pharaoh before Egypt succumbed to Roman opposition, lived from 69-30 B.C., with a rule that was marked with political intrigue and challenges to her throne. She captivated two of the most powerful men of her day, Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, as she attempted to restore Egypt to its former superpower status.

The nearly 150 artifacts in the exhibition – from the smallest gold pieces and coins to colossal statues – provide a window into Cleopatra’s story as well as the daily lives of her contemporaries, both powerful and humble. The artifacts weigh in at about 30 tons in total, including two colossal 16-foot granite statues of a Ptolemaic king and queen from the 4th – 3rd centuries B.C., pulled from the sea by Goddio’s team.

Information and tickets are available at (513) 287-7001 or toll free at 1-800-733-2077, www.cincymuseum.org and www.searchforcleopatra.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


One of the finest finds from the bay of Aboukir is a Graeco-Egyptian product of the Ptolemaic era – a statue of a Ptolemaic queen in black granite. The 7-foot-tall statue is most likely a representation of Cleopatra II or Cleopatra III, dressed as goddess Isis. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

One of the finest finds from the bay of Aboukir is a Graeco-Egyptian product of the Ptolemaic era – a statue of a Ptolemaic queen in black granite. The 7-foot-tall statue is most likely a representation of Cleopatra II or Cleopatra III, dressed as goddess Isis. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

A diver examines a sphinx made of black granite. The face of the sphinx is believed to represent Ptolemy XII, father of the famous Cleopatra VII. It was found during excavations in the ancient harbor of Alexandria. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Jerome Delafosse.

A diver examines a sphinx made of black granite. The face of the sphinx is believed to represent Ptolemy XII, father of the famous Cleopatra VII. It was found during excavations in the ancient harbor of Alexandria. © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photo: Jerome Delafosse.

Recovered from the submerged ancient city of Heracleion during the explorations of Franck Goddio's team, this red granite statue of a Ptolemaic Queen is about 16 feet tall and weighs 4 tons. ©Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

Recovered from the submerged ancient city of Heracleion during the explorations of Franck Goddio’s team, this red granite statue of a Ptolemaic Queen is about 16 feet tall and weighs 4 tons. ©Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation, photo: Christoph Gerigk.

Cut in black granite, this feminine body has a startlingly sculptural quality. Complete, the statue must have been slightly larger than life-size. It represents one of the queens of the Ptolemaic dynasty, likely Arsinoe II. The statue was found at the site of Canopus. © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation.

Cut in black granite, this feminine body has a startlingly sculptural quality. Complete, the statue must have been slightly larger than life-size. It represents one of the queens of the Ptolemaic dynasty, likely Arsinoe II. The statue was found at the site of Canopus. © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation.

Extremely rare photograph of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind, autographed by both stars. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Signature House.

The famous and infamous are signed up for Signature House’s Feb. 12-13 sale

Extremely rare photograph of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind, autographed by both stars. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Signature House.

Extremely rare photograph of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind, autographed by both stars. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Signature House.

UPLAND, Calif. – On Feb. 12 and 13, Signature House will launch its spring offering of over 950 lots in 16 major categories of autographs, documents, books, art and related collectibles. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide the Internet bidding.

The Judeo-Christian & Antiquities section opens the auction and features a rare Egyptian mummy mask from the Ptolemaic Period, along with other Holy Land antiquities. Also on the auction block are signed photos and signatures from various papal and international leaders, as well as letters from the Auschwitz and Dachau concentration camps.

A document signed by Benjamin Franklin is profiled in the Colonial section, as well as other documents signed by John Hancock, Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry, Friedrich Wilhelm Von Steuben, and John Armstrong. The Americana section includes a wide variety of autographs and historical ephemera from Annie Oakley, George Washington Carver and John Brown, plus an early 38-star American Flag, a ticket from the RMS Titanic and Civil War CDVs and autographs.

The extensive Military category features a postcard signed by Adolf Hitler and some of his early followers who later went on to found the Nazi Party. Opening the Heads of State & Royalty section is a document signed by Ferdinand and Isabella, with other valuable autographs including a rare Napoleon I document from his time at Elba, and a note from Neville Chamberlain three days after signing the Munich agreement.

The opening session concludes with items from jurists and politicians, notables from science and technology, and aviators and explorers, including Apollo II astronauts.

The Sunday session includes a sizable selection of letters from U.S. Presidents, including Washington and Lincoln; a Walt Disney-signed dye transfer print celebrating Mickey Mouse’s 25th anniversary, and signatures from composers and literary figures such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Samuel L. Clemens and Jack Kerouac.

The session also includes signatures and signed ephemera from business leaders, notorious felons, entertainers and sports heroes.

For additional information on any item in the sale, email editor@signaturehouse.net.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOT OF NOTE


Extremely rare photograph of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind, autographed by both stars. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Signature House.

Extremely rare photograph of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind, autographed by both stars. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Signature House.

The Smithsonian Building, Washington, D.C.

Smithsonian board supports museum head after censorship protest

The Smithsonian Building, Washington, D.C.

The Smithsonian Building, Washington, D.C.

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Smithsonian Institution’s governing board is supporting the head of the museum complex over a censorship protest by some groups, but is calling for changes in how some exhibits are handled.

Some art groups and others oppose the Smithsonian secretary’s removal of a video from an exhibit after a Catholic group and members of Congress complained.

A review by the Smithsonian Board of Regents released Monday found that changes should not be made to future exhibits once they are opened unless there is an error.

A panel convened to review the handling of the Hide/Seek exhibit included Harvard University professor David Gergen, National Gallery of Art Director Earl A. Powell and John McCarter of Chicago’s Field Museum.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

 

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Smithsonian Building, Washington, D.C.

The Smithsonian Building, Washington, D.C.

Egyptian soldiers repel 50 men in new museum break-in attempt

CAIRO (AP) – Soldiers detained about 50 men trying to break into the Egyptian National Museum in a fresh attempt to loot some of the country’s archaeological treasures, the military said Monday.

Snipers were stationed on the roof of the building, and dozens of troops patrolled the grounds of the famed antiquities museum amid fears that the chaos sweeping Cairo could engulf the nation’s heritage. Some of the most intense anti-government protests in the past week happened near the museum.

On Monday, half a dozen suspected thieves lay in a group on the floor of the entrance, their faces covered by a blanket. Guards said they were caught trying to enter.

A military general at the museum said soldiers arrested about 35 men trying to break into the building on Sunday, and another 15 on Monday. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Troops said they were given orders not to shoot, but to protect the building and its contents.

The majority of the museum was intact, but there were signs of an earlier break-in.

On the second floor, one case containing a gold trinket, two small rods and other small artifacts was broken, and another case was smashed on the first floor. The cases were next to the gated room containing the gold funerary mask of King Tutankhamun that draws millions of tourists a year.

At the museum’s gift shop, broken glass, souvenirs and postcards littered the ground.

Zahi Hawass, Egypt’s antiquities chief, walked through the darkened museum with a military guard and said the museum was heavily protected by the Egyptian military. Later Monday, he was appointed Minister of State Antiquities in the new government named by President Hosni Mubarak, who faces calls from protesters for his ouster.

“If the museum is safe, Egypt is safe,” Hawass said.

A museum administrator found the head of a small clay statue on the stairs.

Looters had broken into the museum on Friday, ripping the heads off two mummies and damaging about 75 small artifacts before soldiers caught them. Hawass said the broken artifacts could be restored.

Museum Director Tarek El Awady said the thieves appeared to be looking for gold, and didn’t understand the value of other artifacts.

The museum houses thousands of artifacts spanning the full sweep of Egypt’s rich pharaonic history.

Before the army arrived early Saturday morning, young Egyptians, some armed with truncheons grabbed from police, created a human chain at the museum’s front gate to ward off looters.

Six boxes of small antiquities were looted from a storage facility in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, but there were no break-ins at the other 24 antiquities museums across Egypt, according to Hawass.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

 

On original illustration for the a Berenstain Bears book. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and The House in the Woods Auction Gallery.

50 years along, Berenstain Bears franchise a family affair

On original illustration for the a Berenstain Bears book. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and The House in the Woods Auction Gallery.

On original illustration for the a Berenstain Bears book. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and The House in the Woods Auction Gallery.

SOLEBURY, Pa. (AP) – A recent venture into his mother’s basement became a Bear Country moment for Mike Berenstain.

Beyond the shelves of sketches and correspondence from hundreds of his parents’ beloved Berenstain Bears books, he found furniture, kitchen appliances and other odds and ends. Why, he gently teased his mother in their studio recently, was she holding onto old stereo consoles and antique toasters?

“It’s like the book where Mama Bear has a trunk full of what she calls ‘valuable junk,’” Jan Berenstain replied with a laugh. “If it worked, I held onto it.”

It’s just one example of the connection between art and life in the Berenstain den.

Nearly 50 years after the Berenstain Bears first charmed preschoolers and their parents, the lovable ursine clan remain as close to its Bear Country roots as the Berenstain children remain to the books bearing its family name.

Stan and Jan Berenstain created hundreds of books until Stan Berenstain’s death in 2005 at the age of 82. Mike Berenstain, the couple’s son, now collaborates with his mother in writing and illustrating new books at the same studio in an idyllic part of Bucks County, outside Philadelphia, that serves as inspiration for the books’ setting.

The gentle stories of Mama Bear, Papa Bear, Brother Bear and Sister Bear, as always, are inspired by the Berenstain family – first from the children and now the grandchildren.

“We remain relentlessly focused on the family relationship. There isn’t one character who’s the star of any of the books,” Mike Berenstain said.

Mike Berenstain, 51, started collaborating in the late 1980s on the books with his parents after creating about 30 of his own children’s books.

“Their greatest popularity was in the ’80s, and now those kids are having children of their own,” he said. “Bad economic times also make people want to have more family-oriented time together.”

The bears are venturing further afield nowadays, with an interactive website, toys, computer games, TV shows, a touring stage musical, a children’s museum exhibit and an iPhone app. A movie by Night at the Museum director Shawn Levy is in the script phase and has a tentative release date of 2012, the 50th anniversary of the first Berenstain Bears book.

The books have tackled modern subjects such as online safety and childhood obesity, and the bears – or their human helpers – answer children’s e-mails and letters, but the goal is to tell enduring, universal stories. Perennial favorites cover challenges of getting kids to doing chores, defuse fears of the first day of school and teach values of kindness and generosity.

“They say jokes don’t travel well, but family humor does,” said Jan Berenstain, 87, who works in her studio daily. “Family values is what we’re all about.”

Stan and Jan Berenstain, both Philadelphia natives, were 18 when they met on their first day at art school in 1941. They married five years later and had two sons. The elder, writer Leo Berenstain, is involved with the business end of the family franchise.

Before their family of bear books was born, the young couple built a successful career. A cartoon series they produced called All in the Family ran in McCall’s and Good Housekeeping magazines for 35 years, and their art appeared in magazines including Collier’s and The Saturday Evening Post.

The first Berenstain Bears book, The Big Honey Hunt, was published in 1962. Over the years, more than 300 titles have been released in 23 languages – most recently in Arabic and Icelandic – touching on topics from patience to pollution and becoming a rite of passage for generations of young readers.

About 260 million copies of Berenstain Bears books have been held in the hands of children and their parents since their earliest books were published with the help of Theodor Geisel, a children’s books editor at Random House better known as Dr. Seuss.

“He was a tough editor, but we learned a lot from him,” Jan Berenstain said. Geisel’s critiques, which the family still has in its large archives, mince no words: “When weak rhymes are used to the extent these are, the reader feels he’s stuck in a rut” is a typical remark.

Geisel also advised the Berenstains to change characters. “There are too many bears. … They’ll be a millstone around your neck,” Jan Berenstain recalled with a laugh.

The couple began working on their second book – this time with penguins – but took an about-face after Honey Hunt became a hit. The Berenstains’ current publisher, HarperCollins, plans to release the unpublished Nothing Ever Happens at the South Pole next year along with several new Berenstain Bears books in the works.

“It’s wonderful to do something you love for so many years,” Jan Berenstain said. “Not everyone has that.”

___

Online:

http://www.berenstainbears.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-01-30-11 0930EST