Anonymous stoneware bust, circa 1850-1900. 7.5 inches high. This figure was probably the lid for a crock, jar or churn. Estimate: $3,000-5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Shein Collection of outsider art in Slotin auction Nov. 9-10

Anonymous stoneware bust, circa 1850-1900. 7.5 inches high. This figure was probably the lid for a crock, jar or churn. Estimate: $3,000-5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Anonymous stoneware bust, circa 1850-1900. 7.5 inches high. This figure was probably the lid for a crock, jar or churn. Estimate: $3,000-5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

BUFORD, Ga. – The highly anticipated weekend sale featuring 1,116 lots of self-taught art, outsider art, Southern folk pottery, and antique and anonymous folk art will be held Nov. 9-10 by Slotin Auction. This sale will feature premiere examples from the Joseph and Janet Shein Collection. LiveAuctioneers.com will host Internet bidding.

The Palmer Museum describes the Shein collection of self-taught and outsider art as “vibrantly eclectic.” This auction will definitely live up to the billing by providing bidders with an exciting mix of Southern folk pottery, circus and carnival freak show items, tramp art, religious items, quilts, African American carvings and paintings, self-taught artworks, masterpieces, international paintings, Native American art, cigar band creations, portraits, trade signs, weather vanes, vernacular photography, canes and more. Slotin Auction specializes in bringing the strange, the unusual and the vanishing America to auction.

“We have a stunning catalog, with some of the best examples by each artist and art form we have ever put together in one auction. There is much to choose from,” said Steve Slotin of Slotin Auction. He added, “Many of these extraordinary pieces are documented and illustrated in the Palmer Museum of Art’s ‘Wos Up Man’ exhibition and accompanying show catalog.”

The Nov. 9 session will kick off at 10 a.m. Eastern with more 113 lots of face jugs, the crowd-pleasing expressions of Southern folk pottery crafted by some of the most famous artisans in the field. The category will start off with eight early face jugs by Lanier Meaders, including Lot 98 a rare china plate face jug featured in the historic Smithsonian “Folklife” (est. $3,000-$5,000).

Several dozen weather vanes, trade signs, religious and propaganda banners, and anonymous items will also hit the auction block including The Revelation of Jesus Christ, circa 1950s, a 16-foot-long hand-rendered religious teaching banner (est. $1,000-$3,000), and a fantastic double-sided Indian head trade sign, circa early 1900s (est. $2,000-$4,000).

Works by Howard Finster are sure to delight, including the Slotin Auction catalog cover, Lot 186, Vision Of Mary’s Angel, #6,908, 1987, enamel on wood, 49 inches by 49 inches, (est. $25,000-$35,000). Also in the sale are Finster’s Time Waits for Nothing, #1,862, 1981, an enamel on wood giant grandfather clock, 81 inches high (est. $5,000-$10,000) and Giant Santa, #3,786, 1984, 97 inches high (est. $4,000-$7,000).

The list of top-tier artists is extensive in this sale. Four works on tin by Sam Doyle kick off the Masterpiece section along with six works by Georgia artist Mattie Lou O’Kelley, of note lot 148, Dividing Fruit With the Neighbors, 1973, from the Fenimore Art Museum, in New York state (est. $20,000-$25,000); six works by Sister Gertrude Morgan, of special note lot 154, The Rising of Lazarus, circa 1970-75, illustrated in Pictured in My Mind, pg. 144 (est. $12,000-$16,000); The Chain of Life, by William Hawkins (est. $7,000-$10,000); works by Joseph Yoakum featuring a rare American mountain range and an extremely rare portrait; three gorgeous works by Minnie Evans; and seven Clementine Hunter paintings, including a special circa 1940s It Was a Day in Spring When I Painted This (est. $4,000-$8,000).

Slotin Auction has scoured the country to bring the rare and unique items out for this sale. Watch for two sculptures from Calvin and Ruby Black’s Possum Trot environment will come up for auction starting with lot 162, The Thanks To You Possum Trot Doll, which sat in the entrance to the environment, 44 inches high (est. $8,000-$12,000). Also attracting interest are a highly erotic Adam & Eve in the Garden wood carving by Edgar Tolson, lot 172 (est. $12,000-$16,000); and lot 106, an anonymous stoneware bust, circa 1850s, featured on page 215 of Robert Bishops iconic American Folk Sculpture (est. $3,000-$5,000). Other treats include, Knight for Christ, lot 165, by William Blayney (est. $7,000-$10,000); lot 166, a singular Dilmus Hall sculpture titled The Mexican Bunch, illustrated in O’Appalachia, pg. 94 (est. $2,000-$3,000); and lot 173, Island Girl and Miss Pee, a sensational erotic sculpture Steve Ashby (est. $2,000-$4,000).

As always, Slotin will feature several new discoveries of note: intricate detailed carvings by Philip Chabot; eight works, including The History and the Evolution of Man, circa 1940s, which features 30 carved figures and typed attached labels affixed to a homemade hinged wooden box (est. $1,000-$2,000); and 10 extraordinary barn-fresh primitive carvings by Mr. Benjamin, an African American from Monticello, Ga., circa 1930s.

Slotin Auction is accepting quality consignments for future sales. Call 770-532-1115 or 404-403-4244. Or email auction@slotinfolkart.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Anonymous stoneware bust, circa 1850-1900. 7.5 inches high. This figure was probably the lid for a crock, jar or churn. Estimate: $3,000-5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Anonymous stoneware bust, circa 1850-1900. 7.5 inches high. This figure was probably the lid for a crock, jar or churn. Estimate: $3,000-5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Howard Finster, ‘Vision Of Mary’s Angel, #6,908.’ Oct. 14, 1987. Signed, dated, titled and numbered. Enamel on wood. Frame is 49 inches by 49 inches. Estimate: $25,000-$35,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Howard Finster, ‘Vision Of Mary’s Angel, #6,908.’ Oct. 14, 1987. Signed, dated, titled and numbered. Enamel on wood. Frame is 49 inches by 49 inches. Estimate: $25,000-$35,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Calvin and Ruby Black, Thanks To You Possum Trot Doll, which sat at the entrance to the environment, 16 inches wide by 17 inches deep by 44 inches high. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Calvin and Ruby Black, Thanks To You Possum Trot Doll, which sat at the entrance to the environment, 16 inches wide by 17 inches deep by 44 inches high. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Slotin Auction imge.

‘Adam & Eve,’ carved wood sculpture with some paint. 12.5 inches high by 13 inches by 13 inches. Estimate: $12,000-$16,000. Slotin Auction imge.

‘Adam & Eve,’ carved wood sculpture with some paint. 12.5 inches high by 13 inches by 13 inches. Estimate: $12,000-$16,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Mr. Benjamin, ‘Cowboy In Cactus Desert,’ circa 1930s-’40s. Carved and painted wood with copper wires, 10.5 inches by 4 inches by 11 inches high. Estimate: $1,000-$2,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Mr. Benjamin, ‘Cowboy In Cactus Desert,’ circa 1930s-’40s. Carved and painted wood with copper wires, 10.5 inches by 4 inches by 11 inches high. Estimate: $1,000-$2,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Sister Gertrude Morgan, ‘The Rising Of Lazarus,’ circa 1970-75, acrylic and ink, watercolor on found paper. Frame is 32 inches wide by 17 inches high. Estimate: $12,000-$16,000. Slotin Auction image.

Sister Gertrude Morgan, ‘The Rising Of Lazarus,’ circa 1970-75, acrylic and ink, watercolor on found paper. Frame is 32 inches wide by 17 inches high. Estimate: $12,000-$16,000. Slotin Auction image.

Sam Doyle, ‘Baseball Player,’ paint on corrugated tin, 7 inches by 48 inches high. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Sam Doyle, ‘Baseball Player,’ paint on corrugated tin, 7 inches by 48 inches high. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Lanier Meaders, rare Smithsonian china plate tooth face jug, circa 1960’s, made for the Smithsonian Folk Life sale. Deep rich drip tobacco spit glaze, 8 inches high. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Lanier Meaders, rare Smithsonian china plate tooth face jug, circa 1960’s, made for the Smithsonian Folk Life sale. Deep rich drip tobacco spit glaze, 8 inches high. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Slotin Auction imge.

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Gallery on 1st Street to auction estate treasures, Nov. 1-2

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Chandler’s Auctions and Estate Sales, also known as The Gallery on 1st Street, will present their Fall Catalog Auction on Nov. 2nd and 3rd, with Internet live bidding available through LiveAuctioneers.

The two-day auction is packed with 1,500+ lots gathered from life-long collections of fine and decorative valuables. The selection features more than 30 pieces of Cartier and Tiffany & Co. jewelry, a rare Native American point collection, works by the famous British sculptor Ralph Brown and early Japanese wood blocks. Additionally, there will be Mid-Century Modern art, Lucite furniture, fine silver and much more.

Many items in the sale are from the Talmo Estate in Palm Beach, Florida. Roy Talmo traveled the world for years and collected a number of fine pieces that he displayed in his home before the residence was sold for land development. The doors and architectural remnants of his estate will be included this weekend.

From the Mindlin Estate of North Palm Beach come works by Marc Chagall, Pablo Ruiz Picasso, Edna Hibel, Henry Moore, Joan Miro, Raphael Soyer and other fine art notables.

This sale also includes Japanese and Chinese artifacts from several private estates in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia; Confederate notes, historical documents, porcelains and collectible figurines, watches, jewelry, silver and more.

For additional information on any item in the sale, call 336-602-3616 or email info@chandlersauction.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Image courtesy of The Gallery on 1st Street

Eugene Delacroix (French, 1798-1863), 'Les Arabes d'Oran,' watercolor, signed and dated lower right 1837. Photo: Galerie Schmit.

Stolen Delacroix painting found in Belgrade

Eugene Delacroix (French, 1798-1863), 'Les Arabes d'Oran,' watercolor, signed and dated lower right 1837. Photo: Galerie Schmit.

Eugene Delacroix (French, 1798-1863), ‘Les Arabes d’Oran,’ watercolor, signed and dated lower right 1837. Photo: Galerie Schmit.

PARIS (AFP) – A painting worth more than 600,000 euros ($825,000) by French master Eugene Delacroix, which was stolen last November from a central Parisian art gallery, has been found in Belgrade and repatriated, a source close to the case said Thursday.

A 50-year-old Serbian has been arrested in Paris on suspicion of having snatched the 1837 work titled “Les Arabes d’Oran” (Arabs of Oran) from Galerie Schmit on the chic rue Saint-Honore, which runs parallel to the Louvre museum.

The man is also suspected of having stolen a crystal statue worth 40,000 euros from a Paris boutique of designer glassware firm Lalique a day before the Delacroix theft.

Delacroix, who lived from 1798 to 1863, was the most important member of the French Romantic movement.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Eugene Delacroix (French, 1798-1863), 'Les Arabes d'Oran,' watercolor, signed and dated lower right 1837. Photo: Galerie Schmit.

Eugene Delacroix (French, 1798-1863), ‘Les Arabes d’Oran,’ watercolor, signed and dated lower right 1837. Photo: Galerie Schmit.

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. (American, est. 1892). vase, ca. 1897-98. Édouard Colonna (German, 1862–1948), vase mounts, c. 1898. Photograph by John Faier © The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

Driehaus Museum to present symposium on L.C. Tiffany

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. (American, est. 1892). vase, ca. 1897-98. Édouard Colonna (German, 1862–1948), vase mounts, c. 1898. Photograph by John Faier © The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. (American, est. 1892). vase, ca. 1897-98. Édouard Colonna (German, 1862–1948), vase mounts, c. 1898. Photograph by John Faier © The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

CHICAGO (PRNewswire-USNewswire) – The Driehaus Museum’s exhibition symposium “Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Artist & His Legacy” is a rare opportunity to hear noted speakers explore the artist’s life and work. Hosted by WTTW’s Geoffrey Baer, it takes place on Saturday, Nov. 16, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The morning begins with a keynote presentation by Tiffany’s great-grandson, Michael J. Burlingham. His perspective of Tiffany’s legacy is followed by symposium host Geoffrey Baer’s interview with museum founder and collector Richard H. Driehaus, who began acquiring the artist’s work in the late 1970s and is recognized as among the country’s foremost Tiffany collectors.

The program culminates with presentations by leading scholars who will discuss how Tiffany’s legacy relates to the past, present, New York, Chicago, collecting and more. These speakers are Exhibition Curator David A. Hanks; Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, curator of American decorative arts, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Tim Samuelson, cultural historian for the City of Chicago; and Carolyn Pastel, vice president and senior specialist, 20th century decorative art and design, Christie’s, New York.

“Tiffany’s work in Chicago has been largely unexplored,” said Lise Dube-Scherr, director of the Driehaus Museum. “This symposium delves deeper into that subject and expands people’s appreciation of Tiffany’s legacy.”

The companion book Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection will be available for sale, with Driehaus and Hanks signing copies at 2:30 p.m.

The symposium takes place at The Murphy, 50 E. Erie St. in Chicago. Tickets are $75 for the public; $30 for students with valid I.D. Group ticket rates (10 or more) are available. To purchase tickets, please visit DriehausMuseum.org.

This symposium is sponsored in part by presenting sponsor BMO Harris Bank, with additional support from Christie’s.

About the Driehaus Museum: The Richard H. Driehaus Museum is a rare example of the palatial homes erected by the wealthy of America’s Gilded Age. The galleries are elegantly furnished with fine and decorative arts of the late 19th and early 20th century, presented in harmony with the restored interiors and surviving furnishings of the Samuel M. Nickerson Mansion.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. (American, est. 1892). vase, ca. 1897-98. Édouard Colonna (German, 1862–1948), vase mounts, c. 1898. Photograph by John Faier © The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. (American, est. 1892). vase, ca. 1897-98. Édouard Colonna (German, 1862–1948), vase mounts, c. 1898. Photograph by John Faier © The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

A Chinese garden scene is carved into the casque of a helmeted hornbill, a tropical bird. Sworders image.

Rare carvings prized at Sworders Asian art auction Nov. 5

A Chinese garden scene is carved into the casque of a helmeted hornbill, a tropical bird. Sworders image.

A Chinese garden scene is carved into the casque of a helmeted hornbill, a tropical bird. Sworders image.

ESSEX COUNTY, UK – A rare hornbill carving will be auctioned by Sworders Fine Art Auctioneers in Stansted Mountfitchet on Tuesday, Nov. 5, at the company’s Asian Art Sale. It is from a helmeted hornbill – the only one of the species to grow a large red colored casque on its top beak. The intricate and detailed scene on this carving is thought to have been copied from a book illustration and shows a woman fingering her pipe in a garden. The expected price for this piece ranges from £3,000 to £5,000 ($4,800-$8,030).

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

“This is exceptional. I last saw a carved hornbill of this quality in 1969. This species of hornbill is not native to China and would have been imported, making it rare, even in the 19th century when it’s thought to have been carved,” said David Battie, Sworders’ Asian art expert.

Another highlight of the Asian Art Sale is a collection of unique seals, many from ivory or jade. One particularly early ivory example, lot 303, standing just over 4 centimeters high, dates to the 15th or 16th century. It has two entwined carved mythical creatures on the top with the seal saying “Kon gang.” This is a ridge in the Konlun Mountains between Tibet and Sinkiang. The mountains are the source of good nephrite jade. The seal is part of a private collection started in childhood and the estimate is £1,000-£1,500.

“During the early 20th century seals were popular souvenirs brought back by travelers to the Far East. At the time they wouldn’t have had any significant value and due to their size would have been easy to pack,” said Battie. The seals were purchased in England over the last 60 years.

Jade pieces are still highly valued by collectors and dealers, with the most sought after being the lightest in color with few blemishes. A pair of Chinese white jade belt ornaments, lot 392, dating to the 18th century and carved with flowering cherry branches, is expected to fetch more than £3,000. These would have been worn around the waist of robes in the Chinese court.

Another highlight is lot 139, two Swatow blue and white Kendi, Shunzhi, mid-17th century. The extimate is £4,000-£6,000.

The Asian Art Sale starts at 10 a.m. GMT on Tuesday, Nov. 5, at Sworders’ Stansted Mountfitchet auction rooms.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A Chinese garden scene is carved into the casque of a helmeted hornbill, a tropical bird. Sworders image.

A Chinese garden scene is carved into the casque of a helmeted hornbill, a tropical bird. Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

Sworders image.

A so-called 'James Bond' Rolex, Oyster Perpetual, Submariner, circa 1958. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Antiquorum Auctioneers.

DreamChrono blog provides news for watch collectors

A so-called 'James Bond' Rolex, Oyster Perpetual, Submariner, circa 1958. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Antiquorum Auctioneers.

A so-called ‘James Bond’ Rolex, Oyster Perpetual, Submariner, circa 1958. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Antiquorum Auctioneers.

NASSAU, Bahamas (PRNewswire) – The DreamChrono blog (http://blog.dreamchrono.com) is aptly named: The luxurious timepieces featured on its pages are among the most sought after in the world. The blog’s purpose is to be the leading resource on collectible wristwatches anywhere in the world.

The time could not be more appropriate, as interest in fine watches has grown alongside a surge in appraised values.

“The landscape for watch collecting has shifted dramatically since the 1980s,” said DreamChrono founder Romain Brabant. “Whereas in the past it was sometimes possible to find hidden treasure at an antique shop or estate sale, today’s more predictable and mainstream market is more accommodating to newcomers. Plus, a higher status for valuable wristwatches and their collectors invariably means higher prices for the most elite pieces. It’s not just grandfather clocks and pocket watches getting all the attention anymore.”

Major auction houses now pay much closer attention to the wristwatch niche, and with good reason. For instance, a Panerai Radiomir sold for a quarter-million dollars at an auction last year. Seasoned collectors understand that a make, model and manufacture date are only part of the equation for determining a value. The internal mechanism is an important consideration, as are the intangibles. The choice of Rolex for superspy James Bond, for instance, adds cache to an already exquisite name.

For collectors, the variety and possibilities in watch collecting are numerous. One might gravitate toward a certain brand, a certain application (military or diving watches, for example), or a certain theme (watches seen in movies). A few of the more noteworthy names on the list of highly collectable watch brands include Breitling, Cartier, Heuer, IWC, Longines, Omega, Panerai, Patek Phillipe and Rolex.

Antique and otherwise valuable wristwatches are firmly in the same category as fine cigars, rare scotch or original artwork from a noted master. But watches bring something new to the table—they’re portable, and unlike a cigar or expensive bottle of wine, they’re not destroyed in the act of consumption. It’s worth pointing out, too, that a valuable wristwatch is functional as well as elegant.

Unlike a Rolls Royce or Van Gogh, many fine and collectible watches don’t require a limitless spending account. Very respectable models can be had for a few hundred dollars, with all but a guarantee that the value will increase. When money is no obstacle, the excitement lies in tracking down the rarest of the rare wristwatches, independent of market value.

Brabant added: “The team at DreamChrono are passionate about watches, and we enjoy hearing from the community. Contributions, such as reviews and feature articles, from professionals in the field are more than welcome. DreamChrono will gladly publish high-quality submissions, as it’s important for us to be open and accessible to watch collectors around the world.”

The fully featured DreamChrono website is currently in a private beta phase, with a public launch planned for early in the coming year.

 

 

 

Jovanka Broz in a 1940s photo when she served in the Yugoslav People's Army. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Ex-Yugoslav first lady’s war decorations stolen

Jovanka Broz in a 1940s photo when she served in the Yugoslav People's Army. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Jovanka Broz in a 1940s photo when she served in the Yugoslav People’s Army. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) – War decorations belonging to the late former Yugoslavia’s first lady Jovanka Broz have been stolen from a memorial complex where she was recently buried close to her husband, Josip Broz Tito.

The Museum of Yugoslav History, which runs the memorial complex dedicated to the late communist leader, said Wednesday police have been informed about the disappearance. No other details were given.

Jovanka Broz’s military decorations, which she received for her role in the World War II anti-Nazi movement headed by Tito, were on display during the Saturday funeral service, which was attended by hundreds of people. Jovanka Broz died on Oct. 20 at the age of 88. It was not clear when exactly the decorations were stolen.

Tito ruled Yugoslavia until he died in 1980. The former federation broke up in ethnic warfare in the 1990s.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-10-30-13 1422GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Jovanka Broz in a 1940s photo when she served in the Yugoslav People's Army. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Jovanka Broz in a 1940s photo when she served in the Yugoslav People’s Army. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

'Million Dollar Auctions' is an unscripted TV show that documents the activities of Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy and his team. Left to right: Morphy Auctions office manager Ashley Wingenroth; CEO Dan Morphy, and his executive assistant, Serena Myers.

VIDEO: TV series about Morphy Auctions debuts in Australia

'Million Dollar Auctions' is an unscripted TV show that documents the activities of Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy and his team. Left to right: Morphy Auctions office manager Ashley Wingenroth; CEO Dan Morphy, and his executive assistant, Serena Myers.

‘Million Dollar Auctions’ is an unscripted TV show that documents the activities of Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy and his team. Left to right: Morphy Auctions office manager Ashley Wingenroth; CEO Dan Morphy, and his executive assistant, Serena Myers.

SYDNEY – An exciting new series based on Morphy Auctions of Denver, Pennsylvania, made its primetime debut on Australian television on October 22nd. Titled Million Dollar Auctions, the show is carried on FOXTEL’s A&E channel, which delivers original and exclusive programming from the US cable giant to Australian audiences in high definition. Million Dollar Auctions joins a powerful lineup of hit shows on FOXTEL A&E that includes American Pickers, Storage Wars and Dog the Bounty Hunter.

The Australian deal with FOXTEL was concluded at Mip TV (Cannes, France) earlier this year by exclusive sales agent and production company Icon Television. Icon TV will have 13 half-hour episodes of Million Dollar Auctions finished by December. The show has generated interest from networks in 10 other countries, including the United States.

“What sets our show apart from some others is that it’s not a reality show as most people would think of the term,” said Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy, the central figure in Million Dollar Auctions. “From the beginning, we set out to produce a series that was genuine and unscripted, with the goal of entertaining as we educated viewers about antiques and collectibles.” Million Dollar Auctions is the creation of Dan Morphy (executive producer), award-winning filmmaker Glenn Aveni (director, executive producer) and Bob Newman (executive producer).

Each episode of Million Dollar Auctions incorporates privileged visits to advanced collectors’ homes, valuations of items that might be lying dormant in anyone’s attic; and actual auction footage taken at Morphy’s gallery, where winning bids decisively reveal what’s hot in today’s marketplace.

In the opening episode, Morphy and his team visit the world’s largest Coca-Cola collection, appraise a rare Mr. Peanut window display, and auction a fantastic lineup of valuable robots.

Episode 2, which aired on October 29th, includes a visit to a $3 million private collection of marbles, plus segments on superhero comics and a prized 19th-century slot machine.

Million Dollar Auctions airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. local time on FOXTEL A&E in Australia. For info on upcoming episodes and repeat times, log on to www.foxtel.com.au. Visit Morphy’s online at www.morphyauctions.com.

Click to view the video trailer about Million Dollar Auctions:

http://vimeo.com/78014195

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MILLION DOLLAR AUCTIONS PROMO from ICON TV MUSIC, INC. on Vimeo.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


'Million Dollar Auctions' is an unscripted TV show that documents the activities of Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy and his team. Left to right: Morphy Auctions office manager Ashley Wingenroth; CEO Dan Morphy, and his executive assistant, Serena Myers.

‘Million Dollar Auctions’ is an unscripted TV show that documents the activities of Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy and his team. Left to right: Morphy Auctions office manager Ashley Wingenroth; CEO Dan Morphy, and his executive assistant, Serena Myers.

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival, 2007. Photo by Georges Biard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Cask of Pitt-Jolie wine auctioned for 10,100 euros

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival, 2007. Photo by Georges Biard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival, 2007. Photo by Georges Biard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

TOULON, France (AFP) – A single cask of organic white wine from the French vineyard owned by Hollywood power couple Brad Pitt andAngelina Jolie fetched more than 10,000 euros ($18,000) at auction on Wednesday, organizers said.

The signed 228-liter (60-gallon) barrel from the Chateau Miraval estate’s vineyards sold for 10,100 euros, which will go towards a sustainable village project eastern Democratic Republic of Congo’s Kivu region.

The barrel was among 27 lots on sale by the winegrowers of the Correns commune in southern France to raise money for the charity, with others going for more modest prices including a magnum of white wine for 170 euros.

The couple teamed up with the French winemaking Perrin family to develop the “Miraval Cotes de Provence” label, named after their estate.

Jolie and Pitt acquired the 500-hectare (1,200-acre) estate in 2008 for around 40 million euros ($52 million) and have used it as a summer residence.

The estate includes 50 to 60 acres of vines.

The first 6,000 bottles of Miraval Rose wine sold out within five hours of going on sale online in March.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival, 2007. Photo by Georges Biard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival, 2007. Photo by Georges Biard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Great Hall at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Image courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.

Detroit manager says city owns ‘very valuable’ art

The Great Hall at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Image courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.

The Great Hall at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Image courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.

DETROIT (AP) – Art has come up again at the Detroit bankruptcy trial.

Emergency manager Kevyn Orr acknowledged Tuesday that some art at the Detroit Institute of Arts is owned by the city and not held in trust by the museum. He says it’s “very valuable” although appraisals aren’t in yet.

Orr says any sales would help the city’s cash flow and might build up sagging pensions. He says no sales were proposed to creditors before the bankruptcy filing in July.

The trial will determine whether Detroit is eligible to fix its finances in bankruptcy court.

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Great Hall at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Image courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.

The Great Hall at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Image courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.