A 1962 Corvette was lifted out of the sinkhole nose first on Tuesday. Image courtesy of Chevrolet.

First 2 of museum’s Corvettes lifted by crane from sinkhole

A 1962 Corvette was lifted out of the sinkhole nose first on Tuesday. Image courtesy of Chevrolet.

A 1962 Corvette was lifted out of the sinkhole nose first on Tuesday. Image courtesy of Chevrolet.

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. (AP) – Two classic Corvettes re-emerged Monday from a giant sinkhole that gobbled up those and six other prized vehicles still trapped beneath the National Corvette Museum.

Workers in a cage painstakingly hooked straps around the cars before a crane slowly hoisted them one by one from the enormous pit that opened up last month. Onlookers cheered after each car was rescued, but the joy was more subdued for the second car, which had more extensive damage.

The first car hoisted out – a 2009 ZR1 Blue Devil – showed only minor damage that included cracks on lower door panels, a busted window and an oil line rupture that oozed oil, said Chevrolet spokesman Monte Doran.

Workers were able to get that car running. Cheers went up as the engine revved at the Bowling Green museum.

“It sounded awesome, just like before,” said museum executive director Wendell Strode.

Doran said the car was in “remarkably good shape. You could have that car back on the road in a couple of days.”

Not so for the other car retrieved Monday, a 1993 Ruby Red 40th Anniversary Corvette. The body panels and window glass need replacing, but the vehicle is salvageable, Doran added.

The frame looked to be “pretty straight,” the underbody appeared intact and the steering gear worked, he said. “Mechanically, it looks to be in remarkably good shape.”

Chevrolet will oversee restoration of all eight cars swallowed up last month when the earth opened beneath a display area while the museum was closed. No injuries were reported.

As the rescue operation began, workers in a cage were lowered to hook straps around the cars before they were hoisted out. The hole is about 40 feet across and up to 60 feet deep, said museum spokeswoman Katie Frassinelli.

“It’s been a huge relief,” said Mike Murphy, construction manager for the project. “It went better than expected.”

Next up is a 1962 black Corvette, which workers hope to recover as early as Tuesday, Frassinelli said.

The museum cautioned that removing the black Corvette will be much “trickier” because a huge concrete slab is partially resting atop part of that car. Two cranes will be used to lift that car and the slab.

The other five cars will remain buried until workers further stabilize the sinkhole, Frassinelli said. That work could take two or three weeks, she said. Strode estimated the recovery could take until mid-April.

The museum plans to display the damaged cars through Aug. 3. The vehicles then will go to a Michigan plant for repairs.

The other cars damaged were a 1993 ZR-1 Spyder, a 1984 PPG Pace Car, a 1992 White 1 Millionth Corvette, a 2001 Mallett Hammer Z06 Corvette and a 2009 white 1.5 Millionth Corvette.

The eight cars are widely believed to have a total value exceeding $1 million, the museum said.

Sinkholes are common in the Bowling Green area, which is located amid a large region of bedrock known as karst where many of Kentucky’s largest and deepest caves run underground.

The museum is open except for the area where the sinkhole occurred.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-04-14 0110GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A 1962 Corvette was lifted out of the sinkhole nose first on Tuesday. Image courtesy of Chevrolet.

A 1962 Corvette was lifted out of the sinkhole nose first on Tuesday. Image courtesy of Chevrolet.

Lake George from the village beach. Image by Daniel Case. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

More digs set for artifact-rich Adirondack lakeshore

Lake George from the village beach. Image by Daniel Case. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Lake George from the village beach. Image by Daniel Case. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (AP) – Archaeologists plan to return to a state park in the southern Adirondacks where they’ve uncovered Native American artifacts dating back thousands of years.

The Post-Star of Glens Falls reports that the search for artifacts in the picnic area adjacent to the parking lot at Million Dollar Beach on Lake George will resume this spring.

State Museum officials announced last October that archaeologists had uncovered thousands of pieces of tools, weapons and other artifacts dating back to the Archaic Period when nomadic tribes hunted and fished along the lake’s southern end.

The artifacts were uncovered prior to a project to repave the beach’s access road and parking lot. The access road is scheduled for repaving this spring while the parking lot will be repaved after Labor Day.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-04-14 1309GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Lake George from the village beach. Image by Daniel Case. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Lake George from the village beach. Image by Daniel Case. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Lewis Chessmen, berserkers. Late 12th century, Uig, Lewis, Scotland. Walrus ivory © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Viking hoard on display at British Museum

The Lewis Chessmen, berserkers. Late 12th century, Uig, Lewis, Scotland. Walrus ivory © The Trustees of the British Museum.

The Lewis Chessmen, berserkers. Late 12th century, Uig, Lewis, Scotland. Walrus ivory © The Trustees of the British Museum.

LONDON (AP) – They had names like Thorfinn Skull-splitter, Erik Bloodaxe and Ragnar Hairy Pants. No wonder the Vikings have a rough and bloody reputation.

A new exhibition at the British Museum strives to make people think again about the Scandinavian pillagers whose name means “pirate” in Old Norse. Through their ships, weapons, crafts, words and even skeletons, “Vikings: Life and Legend” aims to show how Viking energy and ideas redrew the map of the world.

“They were a global phenomenon,” exhibition curator Gareth Williams said of the bearded buccaneers who sailed forth in the ninth century to descend on terrified English monks, Irish villagers and Russian peasants. “They were raiders and they were traders and they were craftsmen and they were explorers.”

Above all, they were sailors and shipbuilders, whose huge longboats, powered by ranks of rowers, took them across the ocean as far west as Newfoundland. To the east, they sailed down the rivers of Russia to the Black Sea and Central Asia.

The Vikings triggered an era of what the exhibition gently calls “cultural interaction” – though it adds that many of those contacts “bloody and violent.”

Historian Michael Wood – who will host a live broadcast from the exhibition to 380 British movie theaters on April 24 – said the Vikings spurred a “formative, almost propulsive era” in European history.

“Dynastic politics, culture, language, economies – they changed the landscape,” he said.

Seafaring skills take the spotlight in the exhibition, which opens Thursday and runs to June 22. It moves to the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin in September.

The centerpiece of the show is the biggest Viking ship ever found. Dug up on the banks of a Danish fjord in 1997, it is 37 meters (120 feet) long and had 40 pairs of oars. Its scale is awe-inspiring even if only 20 percent of the ship’s timbers remain.

But the most spectacular part of the display goes to its enormous range of Viking bling, including gold and silver brooches, necklaces and armbands, some of astonishing size. One braided gold necklace on display weighs 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds).

There is plenty to underscore the Norsemen’s bloodthirsty reputation, from their enormous swords and axes to the startling skull of a Viking warrior, his front teeth filed down and the grooves filled with pigment.

There’s stark evidence of violence in the 50 headless skeletons of young men found in a mass grave on England’s south coast – a Viking raiding party that failed.

But it also shows the Vikings’ sophistication as explorers, diplomats and traders who dealt in timber, furs and falcons from Scandinavia; whale bone and ivory from the North Atlantic; salt and precious stones from the East – as well as in slaves.

Their roaming brought in goods from around the world. The exhibition includes the Vale of York Hoard, a collection of gold and silver objects from as far afield as Ireland, Afghanistan and Uzbekistan, found in northern England in 2007.

The exhibition will puncture some popular Vikings myths. They didn’t wear helmets sprouting wings or horns – that was a Victorian invention. The helmets on display are simple metal skullcaps.

The Vikings’ terrifying image stands in sharp contrast to the way they saw themselves: as down-to-earth people who valued honor, friendship and good humor above all.

A 1,000-year-old book called the Havamal, a trove of Viking folk wisdom, advises that “the best thing in life is to be alive and happy” and says people should leave nothing behind after death but their good name.

Eventually these restless travelers settled down and adopted Christianity, establishing kingdoms and dynasties in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. Vikings settled in across Europe, populating the island of Iceland and becoming progenitors of people including the Rus – from whom we get the name Russia – and the Normans in what is now Normandy in northwest France.

Their legacy lives on in the DNA of millions of Europeans, and in the English language, through a hoard of words including berserk – from the Old Norse berserker, a ferocious warrior.

And their traces are still being found. The exhibition includes the contents of a Viking warrior’s grave – he was buried alongside his ax and sword, inside a boat – unearthed in northern Scotland in 2011.

Viking touches persist in the modern world, sometimes in surprising places. On millions of smartphones, the ubiquitous symbol for a standard form of wireless communication is a rune representing a 10th-century Norse king: Harald Bluetooth.

___

Online: http://www.britishmuseum.org

Jill Lawless can be reached at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-04-14 1452GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


The Lewis Chessmen, berserkers. Late 12th century, Uig, Lewis, Scotland. Walrus ivory © The Trustees of the British Museum.

The Lewis Chessmen, berserkers. Late 12th century, Uig, Lewis, Scotland. Walrus ivory © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Silver-inlaid axhead in the Mammen style, AD 900s. Bjerringhøj, Mammen, Jutland, Denmark.  Iron, silver, brass. L 17.5 cm. © The National Museum of Denmark

Silver-inlaid axhead in the Mammen style, AD 900s. Bjerringhøj, Mammen, Jutland, Denmark. Iron, silver, brass. L 17.5 cm. © The National Museum of Denmark

Hunterston Brooch, c. 700, Hunterston, Ayrshire, Scotland. Gold, silver, amber. Diam. 12.2cm. © National Museums Scotland.

Hunterston Brooch, c. 700, Hunterston, Ayrshire, Scotland. Gold, silver, amber. Diam. 12.2cm. © National Museums Scotland.

Sword, late 8th–early 9th century. Kalundborg or Holbæk, Zealand, Denmark. Photo: John Lee. © The National Museum of Denmark.

Sword, late 8th–early 9th century. Kalundborg or Holbæk, Zealand, Denmark. Photo: John Lee. © The National Museum of Denmark.

Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

UC Davis breaks ground on new $30M art museum

Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

DAVIS, Calif. (AP) – The University of California, Davis is breaking ground on a new $30 million arts museum that has been years in the making.

University officials on Saturday kicked off the eventual construction of the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art, which will focus on art education for students of all ages.

The Sacramento Bee reports it will showcase the university’s legacy in the arts, including the Golden Era from roughly 1960 to 1980 when well-known artists such as Wayne Thiebaud and Robert Arneson taught there and influenced generations of students.

The site at the south entrance to campus will feature a sculpture by William T. Wiley, an artist who previously taught on the art faculty. The new museum will allow the public to see more of the university’s 5,000-piece collection for the first time.

Information from: The Sacramento Bee, http://www.sacbee.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

Artist rendering of the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. Image courtesy of University of California, Davis.

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Reading the Streets: Army of One

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

NEW YORK – In January, the New York City street art community lost Jef Campion, aka Army of One, a firefighter and 9/11 first responder turned artist. I knew his work best for its frequent use of a Diane Arbus image, Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962), which Campion incorporated a series of anti-war wheat pastes.

The boy’s silhouette is superimposed onto doorways or walls already covered over with ads, concert posters, or other graffiti. The boy is a black and white visit from the past, coming out of the chaos underneath. His skinny body and tilted head making him look like a scared lost puppy, gripping the toy grenade like a security blanket.

The grenade often has red spray paint over it, like blood, like maybe the grenade wasn’t a toy and playtime went wrong and he hurt himself. “Army of One” is often scrawled next to the wheat pasted figure, like a secret call to arms. The version I often visited on an East Houston Street doorway had “Give Peace a Chance” written over the photo in bright red paint. Doorways were an especially ominous location for the piece, the red and the boy’s eyes paint a sign of violence lurking just behind them.

Campion was an avid anti-war activist, and used his work as a way to draw attention to how war hurts those who have the smallest stake – if any at all – in the conflict, like children. I felt almost silly covering Campion’s loss so long after it happened, but I went to visit the aforementioned doorway recently, and the boy was gone.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Army of One, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Army of One, New York City. Photo via boweryboogie.com.

Army of One, New York City. Photo via boweryboogie.com.

Stoneware to Orfeo Stante by Arturo Martini, Piccinelli Manufacture, Milano, 1946, 10 3/4 inches (with base). Estimates: €3,500-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Lighting leads the way in Nova Ars design auction March 11

Stoneware to Orfeo Stante by Arturo Martini, Piccinelli Manufacture, Milano, 1946, 10 3/4 inches (with base). Estimates: €3,500-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Stoneware to Orfeo Stante by Arturo Martini, Piccinelli Manufacture, Milano, 1946, 10 3/4 inches (with base). Estimates: €3,500-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

ASTI, Italy – Nova Ars Auction will offer an interesting collection of modern Italian design and decorative arts of the 20th century on Tuesday, March 11. The sale will consist of more than 100 lots of ceramics, furniture, lamps, chandeliers and glassworks, with many objects by important Italian designers, from Mari to Mangiarotti and from Martinelli to Colombo.

LiveAuctioneers.com will facilitate Internet live bidding.

Highlight items in the auction are a stoneware figure by Arturo Martini, circa 1946; a Vico Magistretti floor lamp by Artemide, 1969; a Barovier e Toso chandelier of blown Murano glass, circa 1940; three Carlo Nason wall lamps by Mazzega, circa 1970; and a wooden dining table attributed to Ico Parisi

For details phone Nova Ars at +39 328 9667353 or email e.art.auctions@gmail.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Stoneware to Orfeo Stante by Arturo Martini, Piccinelli Manufacture, Milano, 1946, 10 3/4 inches (with base). Estimates: €3,500-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

 

Stoneware to Orfeo Stante by Arturo Martini, Piccinelli Manufacture, Milano, 1946, 10 3/4 inches (with base). Estimates: €3,500-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Vico Magistretti floor lamp, Artemide, 1969, 71 1/2 inches high. Estimates: €2,500,00-€3,000. Nova Ars image.

 

Vico Magistretti floor lamp, Artemide, 1969, 71 1/2 inches high. Estimates: €2,500,00-€3,000. Nova Ars image.

Ercole Barovier e Toso, chandelier, blown Murano glass, circa 1940, 33 1/2 inches high, 23 1/2 inches wide. Estimate: €2,200-€2,500. Nova Ars image.

 

Ercole Barovier e Toso, chandelier, blown Murano glass, circa 1940, 33 1/2 inches high, 23 1/2 inches wide. Estimate: €2,200-€2,500. Nova Ars image.

Ico Parisi (attributed) wooden dining table, circa 1950, 70 inches by 34 1/2 inches. Estimate: €2,200-€2.500. Nova Ars image.

 

Ico Parisi (attributed) wooden dining table, circa 1950, 70 inches by 34 1/2 inches. Estimate: €2,200-€2.500. Nova Ars image.

Three Carlo Nason wall lamps by Mazzego, blown glass, 7 3/4 inches high, 12 inches wide, 5 inches deep. Estimate: €1,500-€2.000. Nova Ars image.

 

Three Carlo Nason wall lamps by Mazzego, blown glass, 7 3/4 inches high, 12 inches wide, 5 inches deep. Estimate: €1,500-€2.000. Nova Ars image.

Lot 1. Felipe Jesus Consalvos (Cuban-American, 1891-1960), ‘Incarnate Human Gods’, circa 1920/50, mixed media collage on photograph, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$2,500. Material Culture image.

Material Culture auction salutes self-taught artists March 9

Lot 1. Felipe Jesus Consalvos (Cuban-American, 1891-1960), ‘Incarnate Human Gods’, circa 1920/50, mixed media collage on photograph, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$2,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 1. Felipe Jesus Consalvos (Cuban-American, 1891-1960), ‘Incarnate Human Gods’, circa 1920/50, mixed media collage on photograph, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$2,500. Material Culture image.

PHILA., Pa. – In its auction titled “Art 360: Fine, Folk and Self-Taught Art,” Material Culture brings together a rich assortment of art across these artistic categories. The March 9 sale’s over 400 lots encompass painting, drawing and sculpture in fine, folk and self-taught art, as well as prints, etchings, and photography. This approach echoes the auction house’s mission to value art above the boundaries of genre, and enables the offering of more frequent sales to the public in which all types of art are welcomed.

Internet live bidding will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Sunday’s auction opens at 11 a.m. Eastern with the work of significant self-taught artists, both American and international. Two pieces by Cuban-American self-taught artist Felipe Jesus Consalvos (1891-1960) start the day. Working in the tradition of Cuban cigar-band collage, Consalvos’ mixed media pieces in the sale, led by Incarnate Human God (lot 1), balance playful absurdism with political and social satire. Self-taught artist Purvis Young (1943-2010) from the Overtown neighborhood of Miami, Fla., follows with 12 lots of painting on found wood and paper. Of particular note are two untitled paintings of cityscapes, one incorporating fruit (lot 6) into its panorama, and one, figures (lot 8). Among Philadelphian artist Jim Bloom’s (b. 1968) seven pieces up for auction is a mixed media assemblage titled The Undesirables (lot 36). The words of the title are crowded to the top of the paper by a throng of faces and figures. A pair of drawings by Polish artist Nikifor Krynicki (1895-1968) depicts religious scenes; perhaps most compelling is one that places a praying Jesus between two saints in an interior church-like space (lot 61).

Self-taught sculpture includes two carved and painted wooden figures by Howard Ivester (American, 20th century). Both portray women, topless but with hands casually in their pockets, in a pair of jeans (lot 32) or a red hat (lot 33). Another piece of figural sculpture is a ceramic folk art representation of Frida Kahlo (lot 100) from Mexico. This painted terra-cotta Frida is shown with smaller figures – some also identifiable as Frida – attached to the landscape of her skirt, and is signed Josefina Aguilar.

Over 150 lots of fine art come to the auction from the estate of Aaron M. Fine of Swarthmore, Pa., of the law firm Fine, Kaplan and Black, and a passionate collector and supporter of the arts. His collection brings to auction eight pieces by Andrew Turner (1944-2001), a prominent Philadelphian artist whose impressionistic brushwork is evocative of jazz. Among Turner’s paintings, an untitled bar scene of oil on wood (lot 117) may step forward as the most significant. From the same period, Emma Sergeant’s portrait of Imran Kahn (lot 156) is another notable painting from Fine’s collection. British artist Sergeant (b. 1959) shows the cricketer and politician seated in front of a spiral staircase; the perspectives in the painting tilt in a post-Impressionist manner in response to the large size of the board, over 3 feet tall. A large painting by American abstract expressionist John Philip Hultberg (1922-2005), titled Winged Platform (lot 139), seems a gathering of dynamic vistas.

Another highlight of Fine’s collection are paintings by Icelandic-American artist Louisa Matthiasdottir (1917-2000), particularly the brightly colored Landscape (lot 126) with livestock and a dog flanking the pink figure of a girl. Two early works by Richard Estes (American, b. 1932) capture in their perfect observation the artist on the way to creating the photorealist works that would make him famous (lots 128-129). The areas of color that create the man reading or the men at work is more expressionist than Estes’ hyper-realistic work that would follow, but a meticulous eye is the constant. In a provoking self-portrait by Francesco Clemente (Italian, b. 1952), created with colored woodblock printing, the artist gazes out drily from the bottom of the page. The print can be found in a catalog from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Fine collection also showcases 12 lots by American artist Dozier Bell (b. 1957), which exemplify her contemporary continuation of Romanticism’s awe, beauty and fear. Conflict Series #69 (lot 143), a mixed media piece showing a stretch of night sky, is made more noteworthy by the personal inscription from the artist, “To Aaron on His 80th” on the back of the canvas. Czechoslovakian artist Pravoslav Sovak (1926-2000) is represented in five etchings and prints, led by an untitled portrait of woman (lot 272), layered in the upper left with a floor-plan and lettering. The sale features several sculptures by Jorge Rodriguez-Aguilar, a Colombian artist born in 1960. Some are made of metal painted with polychrome, while Pajaro Macua—meaning “Macaw Bird” –achieves an aerial lift in carved, solid wood (lot 132).

Also in Fine’s collection is a large painting by Pennsylvania folk artist Amos Shontz, who specializes in naïve-style representations of animals that bear a resemblance in structure and landscape to the similar paintings of the 18th century. In Aspetando Per Leda (Waiting for Leda) a pig reclines in a pond, balanced compositionally by a pink-white lily (lot 125). Three dye-transferred photographs by Rosamond Wolf Purcell (American, b. 1942) include the brooding, surreal Boy with Violin (lot 164). An untitled drawing by American artist Louisa Chase (b. 1951) plays with abstract shapes and gesture reminiscent of clouds and rainfall (lot 135). Other pieces include David Fertig’s (American, b. 1950) oil on paper painting, Girl Sleeping (lot 158), a lithograph titled Isle au Haut (lot 271) by Fairfield Porter (American, 1907-1975), and five lots by Mary Dewitt (American, 20th century) including an untitled porch scene (lot 220).

Leading fine art from other sources is a painting by Francis Speight (1896-1989), a native of North Carolina who spent most of his life in Doylestown, Pa. The painting, Schuylkill Valley Riverscape, (lot 344) dates to 1935; vehicles of the period are seen in silhouette against the river, mirroring the darkening sky. French painter Frederic Montenard (1849-1926) is shown at auction in a landscape (lot 311) containing a herder and his flock, trooping across arid terrain. Dated 1901, this work of oil on canvas is still displayed in a period frame. James Montgomery Flagg (1877-1960), famous for his “I Want You” Uncle Sam recruitment poster, is shown at auction in an illustration depicting a man tiptoeing along a fence, with text at the bottom that reads, “Private Night Life of a Park Ave Psychiatrist / Dick Hoffman Sings – / I Wonder Why I’m on the Tiles when Pussy Sleeps in a Bed of Smiles” (lot 345). A stained glass piece by Philadelphian artist Judith Schaechter (b. 1961), depicts a woman, tied up and bloodied as if beaten, surrounded by cakes and treats. Titled Sweets Kissed to Death, (lot 383), the stained glass is displayed with a light box in a frame of dovetailed oak.

Some of the most exceptional folk art in the sale is an array of 19th century Russian Orthodox icons, starting with Lot 392. A stunning version of a Burning Bush icon, the work of hand-painted egg tempera and gesso on wood depicts the Virgin Mary as a “God Bearer,” seen as a parallel to the event in the Book of Exodus. Another folk art highlight is an outstanding Haitian sequined Voodoo flag (lot 69), or Drapeau, by Antoine Oleyant (1955-1992). Oleyant, considered to be the father of artistic Voodoo flags, is Haiti’s most celebrated artist of the genre.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Lot 1. Felipe Jesus Consalvos (Cuban-American, 1891-1960), ‘Incarnate Human Gods’, circa 1920/50, mixed media collage on photograph, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$2,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 1. Felipe Jesus Consalvos (Cuban-American, 1891-1960), ‘Incarnate Human Gods’, circa 1920/50, mixed media collage on photograph, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$2,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 117. Andrew Turner (American, 1944-2001), Untitled (Bar Scene), 1983, oil on board. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 117. Andrew Turner (American, 1944-2001), Untitled (Bar Scene), 1983, oil on board. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 125. Amos Shontz (aka Wayne Thorsen), ‘Aspetando Per Leda’, oil on board. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 125. Amos Shontz (aka Wayne Thorsen), ‘Aspetando Per Leda’, oil on board. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500. Material Culture image.

Lot 126. Louisa Matthiasdottir (Icelandic-American, 1917-2000) landscape, oil on canvas, signed lower left. Estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Material Culture image.

Lot 126. Louisa Matthiasdottir (Icelandic-American, 1917-2000) landscape, oil on canvas, signed lower left. Estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Material Culture image.

Lot 344. Francis Speight (Pennsylvania, 1896-1989), Schuylkill Valley riverscape, 1935, oil on canvas, signed. Estimate: $5,000-$7,000. Material Culture image.

Lot 344. Francis Speight (Pennsylvania, 1896-1989), Schuylkill Valley riverscape, 1935, oil on canvas, signed. Estimate: $5,000-$7,000. Material Culture image.

Image courtesy of De Buck Gallery, New York City.

Skateboard art on display at NYC gallery during Armory Week

Image courtesy of De Buck Gallery, New York City.

Image courtesy of De Buck Gallery, New York City.

NEW YORK – During Armory Week, De Buck Gallery in Manhattan will host a special exhibition of unique skateboard art by leading contemporary artists. The artworks were commissioned by Brooklyn-based Woodpoint and Kingsland.

Artists in the exhibition include: Diana Al-Hadid, Brian Alfred, Kevin Appel, Katherine Bernhardt, Iona Rozeal Brown, Kris Chatterson, Peter Demos, Dzine, Austin Eddy, Chie Fueki, Luis Gispert, Yojiro Imasaka, Shay Kun, Tomokazu Matsuyama, Matt Mignanelli, Laurel Nakadate, Anders Oinonen, Matt Phillips, Ryan Schneider, Rudy Sheperd, Chuck Webster, Lane Twitchell, Garth Weiser, Jessica Williams, Guy Yanai, Mie Yim and others.

A cocktail reception will be held at the gallery on Friday, March 7 from 6-8 PM. De Buck Gallery is located at 545 W. 23rd St., New York, NY 10011. Visit them online at www.debuckgallery.com.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Image courtesy of De Buck Gallery, New York City.

Image courtesy of De Buck Gallery, New York City.

Gardner photograph titled 'Ruins of the Norfolk Navy Yard.' Image courtesy of the Mariners' Museum.

Mariners’ Museum hosts exhibit of Civil War photographs

Gardner photograph titled 'Ruins of the Norfolk Navy Yard.' Image courtesy of the Mariners' Museum.

Gardner photograph titled ‘Ruins of the Norfolk Navy Yard.’ Image courtesy of the Mariners’ Museum.

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP) – Some rarely seen images from the Civil War are on display in Virginia.

The Mariners’ Museum has opened a show that features more than 120 photographs from the George Eastman Collection. The exhibit at the Newport News attraction runs through April 27.

The photographs capture Civil War battlefields, prisons and fortress interiors. They were taken by pioneering photographers from the era, including Mathew Brady.

The Civil War was the first conflict in which photography loomed large. For the first time, the American public could view images from the battlefield and the destruction brought on by the war.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-03-14 0707GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Gardner photograph titled 'Ruins of the Norfolk Navy Yard.' Image courtesy of the Mariners' Museum.

Gardner photograph titled ‘Ruins of the Norfolk Navy Yard.’ Image courtesy of the Mariners’ Museum.

One of the buildings on the campus of the former St. Paul's College. Image by Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Former college buildings, 183 acres up for auction

One of the buildings on the campus of the former St. Paul's College. Image by Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

One of the buildings on the campus of the former St. Paul’s College. Image by Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

LAWRENCEVILLE, Va. (AP) – St. Paul’s College in Lawrenceville is up for auction – all 35 buildings and 183 acres.

An auction and real estate company is listing the historically black college for auction at a date to be announced. The historic property in Southside Virginia closed last summer after it abandoned its years-long quest to keep its accreditation and amid crushing debt.

Founded in 1888, St. Paul’s had been affiliated with the Episcopal Church.

In a listing on Motley’s Auction and Realty Group’s website, St. Paul’s is touted as being on the National Register of Historic places. Its 35 campus buildings in Brunswick County include a gymnasium, classroom buildings, administration buildings and dormitories. The property also includes an athletic field.

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AP-WF-02-28-14 0811GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


One of the buildings on the campus of the former St. Paul's College. Image by Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

One of the buildings on the campus of the former St. Paul’s College. Image by Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.