1901 Coca-Cola paper poster, 31 x 26 inches, excellent condition, est. $10,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image

1891 Coke calendar could reach $100K-$150K Dec. 5 at Morphy’s

1901 Coca-Cola paper poster, 31 x 26 inches, excellent condition, est. $10,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image

1901 Coca-Cola paper poster, 31 x 26 inches, excellent condition, est. $10,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image

DENVER, Pa. – More than 800 lots of quality antique advertising will be auctioned at Morphy’s on Friday, December 5th, led by the only known example of an 1891 Coca-Cola calendar. LiveAuctioneers will provide the Internet live-bidding services for the sale.

Entered as Lot 481, the historically important Coke calendar was previously part of the Gordon P. Breslow collection. Years prior to Breslow’s acquisition of the near-mint rarity, it surfaced in Louisiana as part of a pre-1900 pharmaceutical collection.

“No earlier Coca-Cola calendar is known to exist, and significantly, it also promotes the Asa C. Candler & Co. on Peachtree Street in Atlanta,” said Dan Morphy, president of Morphy Auctions. “Asa Candler had a retail and wholesale drug business that served Coca-Cola at its soda fountain. Candler saw how popular the drink was and could foresee its potential on a much larger scale. In 1891, he paid $2,300 to become the sole owner of Coca-Cola, and a year later, he dissolved his pharmaceutical business and formed the Coca-Cola Bottling Company along with four other partners.” Iconic not only for its connection to one of the world’s most valuable brands, but also for its place in American history, the calendar is expected to make $100,000-$150,000 at auction.

Other enticing Coca-Cola antiques include Lot 482, a rare version of the company’s richly colorful 1908 calendar, estimate $20,000-$35,000; Lot 507, an extremely rare 1902 poster, $30,000-$45,000; and Lot 506, a scarce and beautiful calendar featuring the exquisitely dressed model Hilda Clark, $10,000-$20,000. There are many other desirable Coca-Cola lots in the sale, including additional early posters and calendars; serving trays, thermometers, door pushes, blotters, photos, clocks, coolers, store displays and signs.

Nineteenth and early 20th-century advertising was dominated by vices – especially smoking and drinking – as well as various outdoor pursuits, such as hunting and fishing. A fine array of antique advertising signs representing these “manly” categories and more will be offered on December 5.

Lot 261, a paper poster for Deep Spring Whiskey is dated 1911 and marked “American Litho Co.” The profusely illustrated Civil War image depicts the surrender of the Southern army at Appomattox, with General Robert E. Lee on horseback as the central figure, surrounded by troops carrying Confederate Flags and a woman dispensing a drink of whiskey to a wounded man. The poster measures 31 by 39 inches and is estimated at $7,500-$10,000.

Lot 79, an 1896 large-format (36½ by 23½-inch) calendar advertising Winchester Cartridges, has several images of hunters in snowy, wooded settings. In excellent condition, it carries a $4,000-$5,000 estimate.

A rare, 19-inch-tall papier-mache figure of the Philip Morris bellhop in full livery, atop three stairsteps, is emblazoned with the words “Yes Sir!” and “Call for Philip Morris.” A very nice example of a hard-to-find tobacciana piece, it is entered as Lot 693 with a $6,000-$8,000 estimate.

Lot 329 is a 31½ by 48-inch porcelain sign for Croce’s Beverages of Asbury Park, New Jersey. “Drink It – It Is Pure,” the sign assures. Dating to the 1930s, the sign is estimated at $1,000-$2,000.

The auction encompasses many other categories that are popular with today’s collectors, including antique straight razors, occupational shaving mugs, and other barber-shop accoutrements: bottles, canisters, jars, brushes and mirrors. Additionally, there are soda fountain syrup dispensers, early tobacco tins, Mr. Peanut collectibles, a collection of crate stencils, and much more.

The Friday, December 5, 2014 auction will begin at 9 a.m. Eastern Time. For additional information on any item in the sale or to reserve a phone line for live bidding on auction day, call 717-335-3435 or email info@morphyauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


1901 Coca-Cola paper poster, 31 x 26 inches, excellent condition, est. $10,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image

1901 Coca-Cola paper poster, 31 x 26 inches, excellent condition, est. $10,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image

Porcelain sign advertising Croce’s Beverages of Asbury Park, N.J., 1930s, 31½ x 48 inches, est. $1,000-$2,000. Morphy Auctions image

Porcelain sign advertising Croce’s Beverages of Asbury Park, N.J., 1930s, 31½ x 48 inches, est. $1,000-$2,000. Morphy Auctions image

1896 Winchester Cartridges calendar, large format, 36½ x 23½ inches, est. $4,000-$5,000. Morphy Auctions image

1896 Winchester Cartridges calendar, large format, 36½ x 23½ inches, est. $4,000-$5,000. Morphy Auctions image

Deep Spring Whiskey paper poster with Confederate Civil War theme of surrender at Appomattox, 31 x 30 inches, dated 1911, est. $7,500-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image

Deep Spring Whiskey paper poster with Confederate Civil War theme of surrender at Appomattox, 31 x 30 inches, dated 1911, est. $7,500-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image

Only known 1891 Coca-Cola calendar, ex Gordon P. Breslow collection, near mint, est. $100,000-$150,000. Morphy Auctions image

Only known 1891 Coca-Cola calendar, ex Gordon P. Breslow collection, near mint, est. $100,000-$150,000. Morphy Auctions image

Philip Morris papier-mache display figure, 19 inches tall, VG+ condition, est. $6,000-$8,000. Morphy Auctions image

Philip Morris papier-mache display figure, 19 inches tall, VG+ condition, est. $6,000-$8,000. Morphy Auctions image

A first edition of E.B. White's 'Stuart Little.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and PBA Galleries.

Long-lost painting discovered in Stuart Little movie

A first edition of E.B. White's 'Stuart Little.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and PBA Galleries.

A first edition of E.B. White’s ‘Stuart Little.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and PBA Galleries.

BUDAPEST (AFP) – A long-lost avant-garde painting has returned home to Hungary after nine decades thanks to a sharp-eyed art historian who spotted it being used as a prop in the Hollywood film Stuart Little.

In 2009 Gergely Barki, a researcher at Hungary’s National Gallery, noticed Sleeping Lady with Black Vase by Robert Bereny (1888-1953) in the 1999 kids’ movie about a mouse as he watched TV with his daughter Lola.

“I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw Bereny’s long-lost masterpiece on the wall behind Hugh Laurie, I nearly dropped Lola from my lap,” Barki, 43, told AFP on Thursday.

“A researcher can never take his eyes off the job, even when watching Christmas movies at home,” he said.

The painting disappeared in the 1920s but Barki recognized it immediately even though he had only seen a faded black-and-white photo dating from a 1928 exhibition archived in the National Gallery.

Barki sent a flurry of emails to staff at the film’s makers Sony Pictures and Columbia Pictures, receiving a reply from a former Sony employee, a set designer – two years later.

“She said the picture was hanging on her wall,” Barki told AFP.

“She had snapped it up for next-to-nothing in an antiques shop in Pasadena, Calif., thinking its avant-garde elegance was perfect for Stuart Little’s living room.”

After leaving Sony the set-designer sold the painting to a private collector who has now brought the picture to Budapest for auction.

Bereny, the leader of a pre-World War I avant-garde movement called the “Group of Eights,” fled to Berlin in 1920 after designing recruitment posters for Hungary’s short-lived communist revolution in 1919.

In the German capital, he had a romance with actress Marlene Dietrich, and, according to Barki, a rumored fling with Anastasia, the mysterious daughter of Russia’s last tsar Nicholas II.

Bereny’s painting goes under the hammer Dec. 13 with a starting price of around 110,000 euros ($137,350).

According to Barki, the buyer at the 1928 exhibition, possibly Jewish, probably left Hungary in the run-up to, or during, World War II.

“After the wars, revolutions, and tumult of the 20th century many Hungarian masterpieces are lost, scattered around the world,” he said.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A first edition of E.B. White's 'Stuart Little.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and PBA Galleries.

A first edition of E.B. White’s ‘Stuart Little.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and PBA Galleries.

The similar Venus of Willendorf is a 4.4 inch statuette of a female figure estimated to have been made between about 28,000 and 25,000 B.C. It was found in 1908 at a paleolithic site near Willendorf, Austria. The oolitic limestone figure is now in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna. Image by Matthias Kabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

Limestone ‘Venus’ dug up in France is 23,000 years old

The similar Venus of Willendorf is a 4.4 inch statuette of a female figure estimated to have been made between about 28,000 and 25,000 B.C. It was found in 1908 at a paleolithic site near Willendorf, Austria. The oolitic limestone figure is now in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna.  Image by Matthias Kabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

The similar Venus of Willendorf is a 4.4 inch statuette of a female figure estimated to have been made between about 28,000 and 25,000 B.C. It was found in 1908 at a paleolithic site near Willendorf, Austria. The oolitic limestone figure is now in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna. Image by Matthias Kabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

AMIENS, France, (AFP) – A limestone statuette of a shapely woman some 23,000 years old has been discovered in northern France in what archaeologists Thursday described as an “exceptional” find.

Archaeologists stumbled on the Paleolithic-era sculpture during a dig in the summer in Amiens, the first such find in half a century.

“The discovery of this masterpiece is exceptional and internationally significant,” said Nicole Phoyu-Yedid, the head of cultural affairs in the area, on showing the find to the media.

“We were expecting to find classical vestiges such as tooled flint or bones,” said archaeologist Clement Paris.

But on their second day of fieldwork, the team found a pile of limestone that included fragments which did not seem natural.

“That same night we carefully pieced together the 20-odd fragments and realized it was a female statuette,” he added.

Carbon-14 dating showed the statue to be 23,000 years old.

About 12 centimeters (4.7 inches) high, it shows a woman with big breasts and buttocks. The head and arms are less detailed.

“The fact that the sculpture is not totally realistic shows the intent was to produce a symbolic image of a woman linked to fecundity,” Paris said.

Around 100 such figures have been found in Europe, mostly in Russia and central Europe, including around 15 in France, most of them discovered in the southwest.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The similar Venus of Willendorf is a 4.4 inch statuette of a female figure estimated to have been made between about 28,000 and 25,000 B.C. It was found in 1908 at a paleolithic site near Willendorf, Austria. The oolitic limestone figure is now in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna.  Image by Matthias Kabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

The similar Venus of Willendorf is a 4.4 inch statuette of a female figure estimated to have been made between about 28,000 and 25,000 B.C. It was found in 1908 at a paleolithic site near Willendorf, Austria. The oolitic limestone figure is now in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna. Image by Matthias Kabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

Hagia Sophia, now a museum in Istanbul. Image by Arild Vagen This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Pope’s visit draws attention to controversial landmark

Hagia Sophia, now a museum in Istanbul. Image by Arild Vagen This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Hagia Sophia, now a museum in Istanbul. Image by Arild Vagen This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

ISTANBUL (AFP) – The Hagia Sophia, which the pope visits Sunday on his tour of Istanbul, has in the course of some 15 centuries of its history served as a church, a mosque and now a museum but still inflames passions.

Its status as a secular museum open to all allows believers of all faiths to enjoy its astonishing architecture. But periodic calls in the last years for it to serve again as a mosque have caused anger among Christians.

The great building was constructed in the sixth century as a church in the Christian Byzantine Empire, although a church had stood on the site at the confluence of the Golden Horn and the Bosphorus since the fourth century.

It was the seat of the Patriarchate of Constantinople – the name of the city until it was officially changed to Istanbul in the 20th century.

The Hagia Sophia played a crucial role in the schism between the eastern and western Christian Churches in 1054, when a cardinal of Rome laid on its altar a bill excommunication the Patriarch Michael I, sparking the split that continues to this day.

It was badly damaged in the notorious sacking of Constantinople by the crusaders in 1204 and briefly served as a Roman Catholic Cathedral before being reconsecrated as a Greek Orthodox church half a century later after the Byzantine recapture of the city.

When the Ottoman armies under Mehmet II conquered the city in 1453 he ordered the immediate conversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque. Islamic minarets were built around its Byzantine dome.

It served as a mosque until after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire when in the mid 1930s the authorities of the new Turkish state under secular leader Mustafa Kemal Ataturk ordered it to become a museum for all.

But under the rule of the Islamic-rooted Justice and Development Party (AKP), co-founded by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan which came to power in 2002, there have been noises about reconverting the Hagia Sophia into a mosque.

Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc caused a furore in November 2013 when he indicated that he hoped to change the status of the Hagia Sophia.

“We are looking at a sad Hagia Sophia, but hopefully we will see it smiling again soon,” Arinc said, describing the complex as the “Hagia Sophia Mosque.”

Greece reacted furiously, saying such statements “are offending the religious feeling of millions of Christians.”

The Turkish government has long been accused by its secular opponents of forcing Islamic values on the predominantly Muslim but strictly secular country.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Hagia Sophia, now a museum in Istanbul. Image by Arild Vagen This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Hagia Sophia, now a museum in Istanbul. Image by Arild Vagen This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

The exterior of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Image by Winonave. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

New Lincoln museum exhibit has Gettysburg Address

The exterior of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Image by Winonave. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

The exterior of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Image by Winonave. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) – A new exhibit at the Abraham Lincoln museum is offering visitors a glimpse at some of the most significant and historic items in the president’s life.

“Undying Words: Lincoln 1858-1865,” which opened recently at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, includes the bed where Lincoln died, the Gettysburg Address and the bloodstained gloves he was carrying when assassinated.

The exhibit runs through February 2016 and includes artifacts compiled by the Springfield museum and the Chicago History Museum.

The heart of the exhibit is five Lincoln speeches: 1858’s “House Divided,” 1861’s first inaugural address, the 1863 Gettysburg Address, his 1865 second inaugural address and a final speech about the Reconstruction given three days before his death.

“All of his work very clearly is trying to bring people together, to get and keep one country,” Leonard Heumann, a retired University of Illinois professor who visited the exhibit on its opening day, told The (Springfield) State Journal-Register.

Visitors can also see the ink well Lincoln used to write his first inaugural address and a note he sent to Civil War Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, as well as a carriage that Lincoln used in Washington.

The exhibit also looks at the people most affected by Lincoln’s writings: soldiers and slaves. It includes shoes and shackles worn by slaves and a whip. It also has rifles and uniforms from Civil War battlefields.

Chicago History Museum curator Olivia Mahoney said looking at the speeches helps explain Lincoln’s changing views on slavery.

“By studying these speeches, you do see how Lincoln had really grown in his understanding. You see this dramatic change in his views toward slavery,” Mahoney said. “It’s a very compelling story.”

The exhibit also includes a 5-foot-tall Lincoln campaign banner, condolence letters to first lady Mary Todd Lincoln and the model for the sculpture in the Lincoln Memorial.

___

Online:http://www.tenyearslincoln.com/

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-26-14 1912GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The exterior of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Image by Winonave. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

The exterior of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Image by Winonave. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park in Namibia. The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and one subspecies, the western black rhinoceros, was declared extinct in 2011. March 11, 2013 photo by Yathin S Krishnappa, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Canadian antiques dealer pleads guilty to smuggling rhino horns

Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park in Namibia. The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and one subspecies, the western black rhinoceros, was declared extinct in 2011. March 11, 2013 photo by Yathin S Krishnappa, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park in Namibia. The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and one subspecies, the western black rhinoceros, was declared extinct in 2011. March 11, 2013 photo by Yathin S Krishnappa, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NEW YORK (AP) – A Canadian antiques dealer swept up in a U.S. crackdown on illegal trafficking in rhinoceros horns pleaded guilty Tuesday to a wildlife smuggling charge.

Xiao Ju Guan, also known as Tony Guan, entered the plea to a count of attempted smuggling in federal court in Manhattan. Sentencing was set for next spring, when he faces up to 10 years in prison.

Guan, who remains incarcerated, admitted that he tried in March to smuggle two black rhinoceros horns from New York to British Columbia, where he intended to sell them at a store.

The 39-year-old Richmond, British Columbia, resident is the owner of an antiques business in his hometown. He said he had smuggled more than $400,000 of rhino horns and sculptures made from elephant ivory and coral from U.S. auction houses to Canada.

“I knew I was violating the law,” Guan told U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain. “I attempted to mislabel them.”

A plea agreement with the government that was signed by Guan suggested a sentence of between 30 months and 46 months in prison. It also called for Guan to forfeit items recovered during a search of his antiques business.

All species of the rhinoceros are protected under U.S. and international law, and international trade in rhino horns and elephant ivory has been regulated since the mid-1970s. Elephant herds in Africa have been critically depleted over the years by ivory hunters.

In a release, Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara called rhinos and elephants “magnificent animals” and said their survival depends on the enforcement of laws and international treaties.

Sam Hirsch, acting assistant attorney general for the Environmental and Natural Resources Division of the Department of Justice, said Canadian authorities had helped build the case against Guan.

Authorities said Guan bought the rhinoceros horns in New York from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service undercover agents who drove him and a female accomplice acting as his interpreter to a nearby express mail store, where he mailed the horns to Washington state, near the Canadian border and 17 miles from his business.

Guan admitted during his plea that he falsely labeled the box of rhino horns as “handicrafts.”

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-26-14 0000GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park in Namibia. The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and one subspecies, the western black rhinoceros, was declared extinct in 2011. March 11, 2013 photo by Yathin S Krishnappa, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park in Namibia. The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and one subspecies, the western black rhinoceros, was declared extinct in 2011. March 11, 2013 photo by Yathin S Krishnappa, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.