Peter Collingwood elevated weaving from craft to art

A Peter Collingwood macrogauze wall hanging achieved $23,023 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2022. Image courtesy of Sworders Fine Art Auctioneers and LiveAuctioneers.

A Peter Collingwood macrogauze wall hanging achieved $23,023 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2022. Image courtesy of Sworders Fine Art Auctioneers and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — British surgeon-turned-weaver Peter Collingwood (1922-2008) was so passionate about elevating weaving from handicrafts to legitimate art, he pushed its boundaries. Taking apart looms and reassembling them in new ways, he reimagined the process by which textiles could be made, and became one of Britain’s foremost weavers.

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A notable exception to Hale Woodruff’s landscapes is this 1973 acrylic painting, ‘Marisa In Vogue,’ which brought $23,000 plus the buyer’s premium in November 2017. Image courtesy of Rago Arts and Auction Center and LiveAuctioneers.

Hale Woodruff: a trailblazing African-American artist

A notable exception to Hale Woodruff’s landscapes is this 1973 acrylic painting, ‘Marisa In Vogue,’ which brought $23,000 plus the buyer’s premium in November 2017. Image courtesy of Rago Arts and Auction Center and LiveAuctioneers.

Hale Woodruff’s 1973 acrylic painting, ‘Marisa In Vogue,’ brought $23,000 plus the buyer’s premium in November 2017. Image courtesy of Rago Arts and Auction Center and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — Hale Aspacio Woodruff’s (1900-1980) contributions to 20th-century American art could easily fill a book.

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An education in back-to-school-themed collectibles

Selling well above its high estimate, this oil on board by Amos Sewell, titled ‘Back to School,’ achieved $90,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2019. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

Selling well above its high estimate, this oil-on-board by Amos Sewell, titled ‘Back to School,’ achieved $90,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2019. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — Goodbye swimsuits, hello backpacks. The arrival of the end of August and the Labor Day weekend signifies the unofficial end of summer as schools ready to reopen. There’s no better time to look at classic children’s books that have become fixtures of school classrooms and libraries and delighted families at home.

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Australian aboriginal art has captured the world’s attention

This 1995 triptych by Emily Kame Kngwarreye, ‘Ochre Body Paint,’ sold for $19,000 plus the buyer’s premium in July 2022. Image courtesy of Abell Auction and LiveAuctioneers.

This 1995 triptych by Emily Kame Kngwarreye, ‘Ochre Body Paint,’ sold for $19,000 plus the buyer’s premium in July 2022. Image courtesy of Abell Auction and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — Aboriginal art — a term typically used to describe works made by the indigenous people of Australia — takes several forms, all intriguing. They range from body paint and bark paintings to rock art; ochre paintings using organic pigments; textiles; wood carvings; and paintings on canvas, linen or wood. Paintings, in particular, have become one of the most desirable forms of Aboriginal art to collect and are widely represented in museums and fine collections around the world.

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Antique tobacco tins are smoking-hot collectibles

A rare Continental Cubes tobacco tin sold for $5,000 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2020 at Dan Morphy Auctions. Image courtesy of Dan Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK — Patented in 1875, offset lithography quickly became the preferred way to decorate tin products, and the tobacco industry was a pioneer in utilizing the then-revolutionary technology to advertise its wares.

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Prices robust for classic Disney comics, original art

A four-color ‘Donald Duck #4’ (Dell, 1940) made $18,000 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

A Four-Color Comics ‘Donald Duck #4’ (Dell, 1940) made $18,000 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — Disney is the very definition of a household name, represented by theme parks and movies as well as a merchandising empire that spans toys, books, costumes and home decor. One of its most collectible genres harkens back to the company’s roots in animation: original Disney art, comic strips and comic books are perennially popular, and demand in recent years has been high.

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Dr. Pepper collectibles inspire fierce fan loyalty

A large Dr Pepper bottle cap-form tin sign, measuring 39in, achieved $3,500 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2021. Image courtesy of Rockabilly Auction Company and LiveAuctioneers.

A large Dr Pepper bottle cap-form tin sign, measuring 39in, achieved $3,500 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2021. Image courtesy of Rockabilly Auction Company and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — The rivalry between Pepsi and Coke may have sparked the 1980s cola wars, but other soft drink brands inspire equally fierce passion in their fans — fans such as Greg Powers of Providence, Rhode Island. He has one of the largest private collections of Dr Pepper memorabilia, including thousands of items from bottles, cans and signs to bubblegum, cowboy boots and even a Queen Anne-style vending machine. Powers is also a member of the Dr Pepper 10-2-4 Collectors’ Club, which has more than 10,000 followers on Facebook. “I have been collecting for over 40 years. I travel all over the world and take Diet DP with me,” he said. “I started collecting when I met a DP collector over 40 years ago and he gave me a few items. I then started going to antique stores and buying more. I was hooked.”

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Dr. Ivan Bonchev stands in front of his London art gallery and auction house that allows him to blend his twin passions for collecting and for ancient art and coins both as an entrepreneur and an expert.

Dr. Ivan Bonchev made his childhood dreams come true

 Dr. Ivan Bonchev stands in front of his London art gallery and auction house that allows him to blend his twin passions as an entrepreneur and an expert in ancient art.


Dr. Ivan Bonchev (PhD, University of Oxford) stands in front of his London art gallery and auction house, a business that is an outgrowth of his lifelong passion for ancient art and coins.

LONDON – Dr. Ivan Bonchev, founder of Apollo Galleries and Apollo Art Auctions, has long been fascinated with ancient art and antiquities. An expert in ancient and cultural art and numismatics, he graduated with a PhD from the University of Oxford. Ivan opened his gallery in 2008, adding the auction house nine years later. Today, Apollo Art Auctions sells a diverse array of ancient art, including Asian and Islamic, as well as ancient relics and coins.

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A citrine and gold jewelry suite Raymond Yard made for actress Joan Crawford brought $200,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2022. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

Jewelry designer Raymond Yard rose to the challenge

A citrine and gold jewelry suite Raymond Yard made for actress Joan Crawford brought $200,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2022. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

A citrine and gold jewelry suite Raymond Yard made for actress Joan Crawford brought $200,000 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2022. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions and LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK — The life of Raymond C. Yard (1898-1964) demonstrates the power of a heavy-hitting early endorsement. Born to a railroad conductor and a stay-at-home mother, he began his career in the jewelry trade as a door attendant and errand boy for Marcus & Co at age 13, one of the top jewelry firms in New York City. Yard went from earning three dollars a week to becoming one of its top salesmen. In 1922, at the urging of one of Marcus’ most affluent patrons, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., he decided to hang his own shingle on Manhattan’s iconic Fifth Avenue. Rockefeller promised to bring Yard business and he kept his word, not only having the young man design jewelry for his wedding but recommending him to his friends. The jeweler was soon courted by movie stars and high society clients, many of whom commissioned statement pieces from him.

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A Seal of Kentucky Whiskey tin sign achieved $37,500 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2019. Image courtesy of Showtime Auction Services and LiveAuctioneers.

Collectors raise their glasses to vintage whiskey advertising

A Seal of Kentucky whiskey tin sign achieved $37,500 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2019. Image courtesy of Showtime Auction Services and LiveAuctioneers.

A Seal of Kentucky Whiskey tin sign achieved $37,500 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2019. Image courtesy of Showtime Auction Services and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — By today’s standards, early whiskey advertising may seem dated and male-centric. Images of elegantly-attired, cigar-smoking gentlemen drinking together as well as hunting scenes with buffalos and Old West cowboys dominate the medium. The macho archetype of the typical whiskey drinker of the early 1800s gave rise to a whole genre of advertising to appeal to that market. While such advertising imagery would likely not be produced today, it still holds appeal to collectors.

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