Tag Archive for: Detroit Institute of Arts

Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ painted in 1888. A federal appeals court ruled on January 25 that the Detroit Institute of Arts, which displayed the painting in a show that closed last Sunday, must retain possession of it in connection with a dispute regarding its ownership. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which regards this photographic reproduction of the Vincent van Gogh painting as being in the public domain in the United States.

It’s not over yet; now court orders Detroit museum to hold onto disputed van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ painted in 1888. A federal appeals court ruled on January 25 that the Detroit Institute of Arts, which displayed the painting in a show that closed last Sunday, must retain possession of it in connection with a dispute regarding its ownership. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which regards this photographic reproduction of the Vincent van Gogh painting as being in the public domain in the United States.

Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ painted in 1888. A federal appeals court ruled on January 25 that the Detroit Institute of Arts, which displayed the painting in a show that closed last Sunday, must retain possession of it in connection with a dispute regarding its ownership. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which regards this photographic reproduction of the Vincent van Gogh painting as being in the public domain in the United States.

DETROIT (AP) – A federal appeals court has ordered a Detroit museum to hold onto an 1888 painting by Vincent van Gogh amid a Brazilian collector’s dispute with the museum regarding the work.

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Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ on view in a show at the Detroit Institute of Arts that closes Jan. 22. A U.S. District Judge has dismissed a lawsuit regarding the ownership of the 1888 painting, saying federal law protects the work from being seized under the current circumstances. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which regards this photographic reproduction of the work as being in the public domain in the United States.

Detroit judge dismisses lawsuit over control of van Gogh art

Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ on view in a show at the Detroit Institute of Arts that closes Jan. 22. A U.S. District Judge has dismissed a lawsuit regarding the ownership of the 1888 painting, saying federal law protects the work from being seized under the current circumstances. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which regards this photographic reproduction of the work as being in the public domain in the United States.

Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ on view in a show at the Detroit Institute of Arts that closes Jan. 22. A U.S. District Judge has dismissed a lawsuit regarding the ownership of the 1888 painting, saying federal law protects the work from being seized under the current circumstances. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which regards this photographic reproduction of the Vincent van Gogh painting as being in the public domain in the United States.

DETROIT (AP) – On Jan. 20, a judge dismissed a lawsuit regarding control of an 1888 painting by Vincent van Gogh, saying federal law bars him from stepping into a dispute between a Brazilian collector and a Detroit museum. The painting of a woman with a book, titled The Novel Reader, is protected from seizure, and the Detroit Institute of Arts can’t be ordered to give it up, U.S. District Judge George Caram Steeh said.

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Vincent Van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ aka ‘The Reading Lady,’ which he painted in Arles, France November 1888. On Jan. 11, a judge ruled that the Detroit Institute of Arts, which is displaying the painting in a current Van Gogh exhibit, must retain it after the show closes on Jan. 22. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which considers it to be in the public domain in the United States.

Judge tells Detroit museum: Don’t move van Gogh painting

Vincent Van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ aka ‘The Reading Lady,’ which he painted in Arles, France November 1888. On Jan. 11, a judge ruled that the Detroit Institute of Arts, which is displaying the painting in a current Van Gogh exhibit, must retain it after the show closes on Jan. 22. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which considers it to be in the public domain in the United States.

Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Novel Reader,’ aka ‘The Reading Lady,’ which he painted in Arles, France in November 1888. On Jan. 11, a judge ruled that the Detroit Institute of Arts, which is displaying the painting in a current exhibit, must retain it after the show closes on Jan. 22. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, which considers it to be in the public domain in the United States.

DETROIT (AP) – On Jan. 11, a judge ordered a Detroit museum to hold onto an 1888 painting by Vincent van Gogh in response to a lawsuit by its owner, who claims it has been missing for nearly six years. The painting, titled The Novel Reader or The Reading Lady, is part of a rare van Gogh exhibit, which ends Jan. 22 at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

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Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), ‘Self Portrait,’ 1887. Oil on artist board mounted to wood panel; 13 ¾ by 10 ½in (34.9 by 26.7cm). Detroit Institute of Arts, City of Detroit Purchase, 22.13

Van Gogh in America concludes its Detroit run on Jan. 22

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), ‘Self Portrait,’ 1887. Oil on artist board mounted to wood panel; 13 ¾ by 10 ½in (34.9 by 26.7cm). Detroit Institute of Arts, City of Detroit Purchase, 22.13


Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), ‘Self Portrait,’ 1887. Oil on artist board mounted to wood panel; 13 ¾ by 10 ½in (34.9 by 26.7cm). Detroit Institute of Arts, City of Detroit Purchase, 22.13

DETROIT – On the centenary of its status as the first public museum in the United States to purchase a painting by Vincent van Gogh, the Detroit Institute of Arts presents a landmark exhibition that tells the story of the artist’s rise to prominence among American audiences. Van Gogh in America features 74 original paintings, drawings, and prints by the Dutch Post-Impressionist artist, and will continue through January 22, 2023. Visitors can experience the defining moments, people and circumstances that catapulted Van Gogh’s work to widespread acclaim in the United States.

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Duane Lloyd Bohnstedt (1924-2016), ‘Chevrolet Corvette,’ 1964. Watercolor on board. Detroit Institute of Arts, gift of Robert Edwards and Julie Hyde-Edwards.

$5M gift to Detroit Institute of Arts to fund automotive art acquisitions

Duane Lloyd Bohnstedt (1924-2016), ‘Chevrolet Corvette,’ 1964. Watercolor on board. Detroit Institute of Arts, gift of Robert Edwards and Julie Hyde-Edwards.

Duane Lloyd Bohnstedt (1924-2016), ‘Chevrolet Corvette,’ 1964. Watercolor on board. Detroit Institute of Arts, gift of Robert Edwards and Julie Hyde-Edwards.

DETROIT – Funded by a gift of $5 million from the Mort and Brigitte Harris Foundation, the Detroit Institute of Arts will hire a new curator and acquire works across media that illuminate the interrelated creative and technological, design and functional endeavors that defined and continue to characterize the ingenuity and development of the American automotive industry, with an emphasis on Detroit’s distinctive place in this narrative. The new collection will be launched with a generous gift of 91 automotive drawings from Julie Hyde-Edwards, which represents decades of study, collecting and advocacy by Julie and her late husband Robert Edwards on behalf of Detroit car designers and the art they produced.

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‘Ford Nucleon Atomic Powered Vehicle, Rear Side View,’ 1956, Albert L. Mueller, American. Gouache, pastel, prismacolor, brown-line print on vellum. Collection of Robert L. Edwards and Julie Hyde-Edwards.

Car-design exhibition ‘Detroit Style’ extends its run at DIA

‘Ford Nucleon Atomic Powered Vehicle, Rear Side View,’ 1956, Albert L. Mueller, American. Gouache, pastel, prismacolor, brown-line print on vellum. Collection of Robert L. Edwards and Julie Hyde-Edwards.

‘Ford Nucleon Atomic Powered Vehicle, Rear Side View,’ 1956, Albert L. Mueller, American. Gouache, pastel, prismacolor, brown-line print on vellum. Collection of Robert L. Edwards and Julie Hyde-Edwards.

DETROIT — In celebration of Detroit’s history as the hub of American automotive design, the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) is enjoying success with its special exhibition titled Detroit Style: Car Design in the Motor City, 1950–2020. Since opening on November 15, 2020, the popular show has been extended multiple times. Its current end date is June 5.

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Kwame Brathwaite, ‘Sikolo Brathwaite, African Jazz-Art Society & Studios (AJASS),’ Harlem, ca. 1968; from Kwame Brathwaite: Black Is Beautiful (Aperture, 2019)

Detroit Institute of Arts celebrates photography of Kwame Brathwaite

Kwame Brathwaite, ‘Sikolo Brathwaite, African Jazz-Art Society & Studios (AJASS),’ Harlem, ca. 1968; from Kwame Brathwaite: Black Is Beautiful (Aperture, 2019)

Kwame Brathwaite, ‘Sikolo Brathwaite, African Jazz-Art Society & Studios (AJASS),’ Harlem, ca. 1968; from Kwame Brathwaite: Black Is Beautiful (Aperture, 2019)

DETROIT – This fall, the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), in collaboration with Aperture traveling exhibitions, presents Black Is Beautiful: The Photography of Kwame Brathwaite, featuring more than 40 black-and-white and color works by Brathwaite, an influential activist, photographer and co-founder of the African Jazz-Arts Society and Studios (AJASS). The show opened October 8 and continues through January 16, 2022. Read more

DIA acquires painting by Danish Surrealist Rita Kernn-Larsen

Rita Kernn-Larsen, ‘And Life Anew … ,” 1940, recently acquired by the Detroit Institute of Arts

Rita Kernn-Larsen, ‘And Life Anew … ,” 1940, recently acquired by the Detroit Institute of Arts

DETROIT  – The Detroit Institute of Arts’ board of directors has approved the purchase of a work by Danish artist Rita Kernn-Larsen (1904-1998), furthering the museum’s goal of increasing the number of works by women artists in the collection. This will be the first work by the artist—and the first Surrealist painting by a woman—to enter the museum’s collection. It will also be one of the only paintings by Kernn-Larsen in an American museum collection.

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