Later dates chosen for Britain’s 2008 LAPADA show

LONDON – Now in its fifth year, the Autumn Antiques and Fine Art Fair, held in association with LAPADA (London & Provincial Antiques Dealers Assn.) has become an annual showcase for 60 professional dealers of fine art and antiques. This year the show’s management advises the event will take place a month later than usual, and will be held Thursday, Nov. 27 through Sunday, Nov. 30 at The Centaur, Cheltenham Racecourse in Cheltenham, England.

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Orioles Commemorative Pin. Image By Catherine Saunders-Watson

Orioles-Yankees fans receive surprise collectible at Aug. 23 game in Baltimore

Orioles Commemorative Pin. Image By Catherine Saunders-Watson

Orioles Commemorative Pin. Image By Catherine Saunders-Watson

BALTIMORE (ACNI) – Fans passing through the entry gates at Oriole Park on Saturday, Aug. 23, received an unexpected and very collectible surprise: a handsome enameled pin commemorating the Baltimore Orioles’ 100 millionth home game fan. Based on pre-season sales, the legendary baseball team’s management knew exactly which ticket from which game marked the milestone, and based on that knowledge, arranged for special shield-form pins to be created for each fan in attendance on Saturday evening.

The orange, black and silvery white pins say “Memorial Stadium – Oriole Park” and “100 Millionth Fan.” Each pin was affixed to a glossy, light cardboard backing that says, in part, “This pin commemorates the game in 2008 that the 100 millionth fan attended…” It also states: “From 1954 through 1991, Memorial Stadium hosted nearly 50 million fans, and earlier this season, Oriole Park at Camden Yards passed the 50 million mark in just its 17th season.”

Who was the lucky 100 millionth fan? Velma Greene, a middle school teacher from Fairfax County, Va., who wore team colors to the on-field ceremony in which she was presented with a gift – a $100,000 check, courtesy of the Orioles and the Maryland Lottery. An ecstatic Greene also received season tickets to Orioles home games for five years plus an immediate VIP upgrade for that night’s game.

While Orioles supporters may have gone home disappointed over their team’s 5-3 loss to the Yankees, at least each of them had a nifty pinback to serve as a consolation prize. Limited-edition mementos are something fans would expect in Baltimore, since the Orioles’ minority owner, Stephen A. Geppi, is a collectibles-minded guy. Geppi heads an empire that includes auction companies, licensed merchandise production, and comic book and price guide publishing.

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Scrimshaw artist William A. Gilpin depicted a Jack Tar sailor standing atop a whale on one side of a sperm whale tooth. Image courtesy of Sotheby’s New York.

Whale’s tooth pinpoints identity of scrimshaw artist William A. Gilpin

Scrimshaw artist William A. Gilpin depicted a Jack Tar sailor standing atop a whale on one side of a sperm whale tooth. Image courtesy of Sotheby’s New York.

Scrimshaw artist William A. Gilpin depicted a Jack Tar sailor standing atop a whale on one side of a sperm whale tooth. Image courtesy of Sotheby’s New York.

NEW YORK – “Thar she blows!”

This fabled cry of 19th-century whalers will be heard Sept. 26 when Sotheby’s New York will offer one of the most important works of scrimshaw to be discovered in the last decade. The rare piece of American folk art is a scrimshaw sperm whale’s tooth engraved by William A. Gilpin on board the ship Ceres, sailing out of Wilmington, Del.

Engraved by Gilpin in 1835 while at sea, the scrimshaw tooth has been proclaimed as a key to unlocking the mysteries of a historic and highly regarded series of scrimshaw sperm whales’ teeth.

The exquisite work is estimated to bring $40,000-$60,000 and will be on exhibition in Sotheby’s New York galleries beginning Sept. 20.

The current owner received the tooth as a holiday gift from an elderly friend. As an American history enthusiast he was struck by its beauty and obvious age, but had no knowledge of its true significance. After having displayed the tooth for more than 25 years in his home, he took the advice of a collector friend and had it appraised by experts.

Dr. Stuart M. Frank, senior curator of the New Bedford Whaling Museum, said, “Every now and then a watershed piece shows up that is not only an aesthetic tour-de-force but has unique and enduring historical and iconographical significance that, in addition to being a thing of beauty, enlightens the genre and informs research. The so-called Ceres Tooth by William Gilpin is just such an outstanding piece.”

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Dr. Scott D. Gillogly displayed his ultimate Matchbox collection in built-in showcases.

Unmatched: Atlanta doctor to sell multi-million dollar Matchbox collection

Dr. Scott D. Gillogly displayed his ultimate Matchbox collection in built-in showcases.

Dr. Scott D. Gillogly displayed his ultimate Matchbox collection in built-in showcases.

Dr. Scott D. Gillogly is a prominent orthopedic surgeon in Atlanta. He is the head team physician for the Atlanta Thrashers NHL hockey team and the Atlanta Falcons NFL football team. Dr. Gillogly has specialized in sports medicine since completing a distinguished military career in the Army Medical Corps with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He received meritorious service commendations as chief of orthopedics at an evacuation hospital during Operations Desert Shield/Storm. As a cadet at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Gillogly was captain and quarterback of the Army football team.

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Tenth edition of Morphy’s York Antique Toy, Doll, Holiday & Advertising Show slated for Aug. 23

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YORK, Pa. – On Saturday, Aug. 23, Dan Morphy will host the tenth edition of his Antique Toy, Doll, Holiday & Advertising Show at the Memorial Hall, York Fairgrounds, in York, Pa. The semiannual show has developed into a powerhouse event of 350 tables, with approximately 175 topnotch dealers from North America and Europe participating.


“This time it should be a good mix of our regular dealers, who are some of the best names in the business, and new dealers who’ve heard about the show’s reputation for being a fast, friendly selling event with a great selection of merchandise,” said Morphy. “It’s a highlight on the calendars of many dealers and collectors.”

Starting with the August edition, the York Toy Show returns to the Memorial Hall of the York Fairgrounds, the venue where it launched in 2002. Wide aisles, excellent food service and ample, close-in parking are features show attendees can look forward to at the Memorial Hall, Morphy said.

This stunning coffee table with free-edge buckeye burl top with natural occlusions and walnut base was made in 1981 and retained a copy of Nakashima’s original drawing. It brought a record $288,000 at a Sollo Rago sale on April 21, 2007. Image courtesy Sollo Rago Auctions.

Into the Woods: Nakashima Furniture

This stunning coffee table with free-edge buckeye burl top with natural occlusions and walnut base was made in 1981 and retained a copy of Nakashima’s original drawing. It brought a record $288,000 at a Sollo Rago sale on April 21, 2007. Image courtesy Sollo Rago Auctions.

This stunning coffee table with free-edge buckeye burl top with natural occlusions and walnut base was made in 1981 and retained a copy of Nakashima’s original drawing. It brought a record $288,000 at a Sollo Rago sale on April 21, 2007. Image courtesy Sollo Rago Auctions.

George Nakashima was an interpreter of trees, listening to the voice of nature and translating wood and bark into timeless furniture.

That’s part of the allure of Nakashima (1905-1990), the iconic artisan whose sinuous, realistic studies attract a growing crop of admirers.

“One of the enduring qualities of his work is his ability to communicate his love of wood to other people,” says Robert Aibel, who sells Nakashima furniture at Moderne Gallery in Philadelphia. “He made furniture that people live with – the dining room table where you eat, the rocker where you nurse your baby.” Nakashima was the most prolific and best-known figure of the American Studio Furniture Movement (1940-1990), an artistic renaissance born in the City of Brotherly Love that promoted craft as an antidote to mass-produced modern furniture. Nakashima’s workshop in nearby New Hope, Pa., produced 25,000 pieces ranging from two-legged Conoid chairs to the massive Peace Table at the Cathedral of John the Divine in Manhattan. Matt Freeman, who grew up a few miles from the studio, was raised with Nakashima furniture his parents used and enjoyed every day. He remembers the list of pieces getting taller as he did, eventually including a dining room table and chairs, end tables, cabinets and shelves.

“My parents weren’t overly protective about the furniture, but all the pieces are in pristine shape today, 40 years later,” he said. “Even as kids we had this quiet respect for the way they were made … They’d just sort of sit there quietly glowing. We’d set down our soda glasses and sticky lollipops somewhere else, not on the Nakashima.”

Like children, each tree has its own personality. Nakashima was the first to embrace the knotholes, fissures and splits in wood as wondrous expressions of nature rather than imperfections. While most furniture makers discard the thin, irregular ends of slabs, Nakashima integrated them into his designs. Known as “free edges,” those elements are factors in determining the value of a piece. Basically, the more free edges, the greater the value.

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This image of the port of Marseille was produced in 1929 by Roger Broders. Image courtesy Poster Connection.

Streamlined Dreams: Deco Posters

This image of the port of Marseille was produced in 1929 by Roger Broders. Image courtesy Poster Connection.

This image of the port of Marseille was produced in 1929 by Roger Broders. Image courtesy Poster Connection.

They look chic with spare, contemporary interiors. They complement Mid-century industrial styles. And they fit beautifully, of course, with furnishings from the 1920s and ’30s.

Art Deco posters make a 20th-century statement that has resonated ever since their creation.

They are also in great demand among collectors, and their values have soared since the 1990s. In spite of this upsurge, there are still relatively affordable Deco posters that cover a range of themes and subjects in striking, brilliant designs.

Joerg and Joern Weigelt are father and son poster dealers who have shops on either side of the Western world. Both have a strong appreciation for the Deco style.

The family penchant for posters began in 1978 at a flea market, Joerg Weigelt explained, where he found a postcard, dated 1910, of a Ludwig Hohlwein poster. “This was our first contact with posters – a small poster reproduced on a postcard. After that, we started looking for posters in their full sizes.”

In 1982 he opened Galerie fur Gebrauchsgraphik (Gallery for Commercial Art) in Hannover, Germany. Back then, “people wanted artists like Franz von Stuck and Alphonse Mucha, and any really old posters. But there were some forward-looking collectors and dealers who were already turning their attention to the late 1910s, 1920s and 1930s,” according to Joerg.

By the early 1990s, historism, which imitated styles from older periods, and Art Nouveau posters were out of reach for most collectors. “So people had no choice but to look for new areas of interest,” and they turned to the 1920s, Joerg said.

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