The 'Frankenstein' poster sold for $262,900 at Heritage Auctions, a record for a movie insert poster. Heritage Auctions image.

‘Frankenstein’ poster brings $262,900 at Heritage Auctions

The 'Frankenstein' poster sold for $262,900 at Heritage Auctions, a record for a movie insert poster. Heritage Auctions image.

The ‘Frankenstein’ poster sold for $262,900 at Heritage Auctions, a record for a movie insert poster. Heritage Auctions image.

DALLAS – An original 1931 poster for Frankenstein set a world record as the most valuable insert movie poster ever sold at auction when it realized $262,900 at Heritage Auctions on July 27.

The sale provided a monster payday for the collector who bought it as a teenager for only a few dollars at a local antique store and later kept it in the closet for over 30 years. The entire auction sold more than $1.86 million in movie posters and related movie memorabilia.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The Frankenstein poster was owned by Keith Johnson, of Ottawa, Ill.

“I got it from an antique store in town in either 1968 or 1969, and I probably only paid $2 to $5 for it,” said Johnson.

Johnson’s wife, Julie, said the framed Frankenstein poster “was kept in the closet for the 30-plus years we’ve been married. Every once in a while we would pour ourselves a glass of wine and go take a look at it. We always loved it, and thought it was very cool.”

“It was strong sale overall and people were out in numbers participating,” said Grey Smith, director of movie posters at Heritage. “We couldn’t be happier for the consignor.”

Insert posters were printed on card stock paper and designed for movie theater display cases that would fit a 14-by-36-inch poster such as this one, Smith explained.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized

Oskar Schindler as photographed in Argentina after World War II. Origin: Wikipedia.org, courtesy of Yad Vashem Photo Archive. This image is a faithful digitization of a unique historic image, and the copyright is most likely held by the person who took the photograph or the agency that employed the photographer. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright law.

Original copy of Schindler’s list fails to find eBay buyer

Oskar Schindler as photographed in Argentina after World War II. Origin: Wikipedia.org, courtesy of Yad Vashem Photo Archive. This image is a faithful digitization of a unique historic image, and the copyright is most likely held by the person who took the photograph or the agency that employed the photographer. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright law.

Oskar Schindler as photographed in Argentina after World War II. Origin: Wikipedia.org, courtesy of Yad Vashem Photo Archive. This image is a faithful digitization of a unique historic image, and the copyright is most likely held by the person who took the photograph or the agency that employed the photographer. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright law.

LOS ANGELES (AFP) – An original copy of the list of Jews saved by Oskar Schindler from the Holocaust has gone unsold on eBay, but the auctioneer said Monday he’s not disappointed.

The 14-page typewritten list—bearing the names of 801 men—originated with the German industrialist’s right-hand man Itzhak Stern and had a steep opening bid of $3 million.

But by the end of the online auction Sunday at 6 p.m. Los Angeles time, not one bid had been placed—although there was no lack of interest.

“Over half a million people viewed the auction on eBay and we had more than 13,000 ‘watchers’ (individuals monitoring a potential sale), which is exceptionally high,” auctioneer Eric Gazin told AFP by email.

Without giving details, Gazin said “active discussions” now are underway with “multiple parties” who are still interested in acquiring the one-of-a-kind document.

In the meantime, he added, “there are no plans to relist the list or lower the price.”

The list is one of four known to exist, and the only one in private hands. The others are in museums in Israel and the United States.

It once belonged to a nephew of Stern in Israel who sold it about three years ago to the current owner, who acquired it as an investment, Gazin’s partner Gary Zimet, of momentsintime.com, told AFP.

Schindler is credited with saving the lives of some 1,200 Jews employed in his factories during World War II. He died in anonymity in Germany in 1974 at the age of 66.

His story was the focal point of director Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-winning film Schindler’s List in 1993.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Oskar Schindler as photographed in Argentina after World War II. Origin: Wikipedia.org, courtesy of Yad Vashem Photo Archive. This image is a faithful digitization of a unique historic image, and the copyright is most likely held by the person who took the photograph or the agency that employed the photographer. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright law.

Oskar Schindler as photographed in Argentina after World War II. Origin: Wikipedia.org, courtesy of Yad Vashem Photo Archive. This image is a faithful digitization of a unique historic image, and the copyright is most likely held by the person who took the photograph or the agency that employed the photographer. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright law.

A 1900 Locomobile. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Museum considers future of steam-powered Locomobile

A 1900 Locomobile. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

A 1900 Locomobile. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) – As William U. Martin traveled the streets of South Bend in 1901 on his business appointments as a piano tuner, the little Locomobile steamer he drove captured the public eye.

After all, it was one of the first automobiles in the city.

That early steam-powered auto still exists, although it’s in fragile condition. Part of the Center for History’s collection, it’s been stored away from public view for about 20 years.

The vehicle, about the size of a horse cart, looks more like a small wagon or sleigh than a modern automobile.

It’s believed to be the oldest car still in existence from the dawn of the auto age in South Bend.

Martin, the car’s original owner, was a South Bend musician and a piano and organ tuner for the Elbel music store for nearly 40 years. Martin drove it on the job making house calls to tune musical instruments, according to newspaper accounts. It was the first auto bought and used for commercial purposes in the city.

The Locomobile Co. of America was an automobile manufacturer founded in 1899 in Watertown, Mass., but production transferred a year later to Bridgeport, Conn., where it continued in business until 1929. The firm produced small steam cars until 1903, then switched to larger gasoline internal-combustion vehicles.

By 1902, Locomobile (the name was a combination of the words “locomotive” and “automobile”) had sold 5,200 vehicles, making the company, at that time, the largest producer of autos in the country, according to the Locomobile Society of America.

(1902 was the same year the Studebaker carriage and wagon company, based in South Bend, entered the automotive market with production of electric cars. The oldest Studebaker auto in the Studebaker National Museum collection dates from 1904.)

The new car was delivered to Martin in South Bend on March 4, 1901, according to a February 1932 interview he gave to the South Bend News-Times.

Martin ordered the Locomobile from Manlove A. “Cap” Shuey, who established the first automotive garage in South Bend and was the city’s first local car dealer.

“It was a bad day in South Bend, a heavy snow falling, but Capt. Shuey and I unloaded the thing, got it started and drove over some of the streets. Of course, automobiles were a curiosity in South Bend, this contraption aroused much interest and people stopped to watch it as we moved through the streets at what to-day would be a very modest speed,” Martin recalled in the interview.

Leighton Pine, an executive at the Singer Sewing Machine works in South Bend, had bought a Locomobile earlier (likely a 1900 model) but had trouble with it. “He did not seem to think much of it and told me it was all right as a toy but would never be of practical use,” Martin said. Pine died in 1905.

Martin said shortly after getting his car, while he was driving it near Rolling Prairie, the vehicle startled a horse, which started running ahead of the Locomobile down the road. The scene was viewed with astonishment by a group of schoolchildren, some of whom likely had never before seen a “horseless carriage.” Martin said one boy yelled at him: “Hey there, mister, you’ve lost your horse.”

By 1932, Martin had donated his Locomobile to the collection of the Northern Indiana Historical Society and it was a popular item on display in the Old Court House Museum. The year he donated the vehicle is unknown.

Martin died at age 78 in March 1932.

It isn’t known how many Locomobile steam autos still exist. A restored 1900 Locomobile steam runabout, previously part of the S. Ray Miller auto collection in Elkhart, Ind., sold at auction in 2004 for $49,500.

The South Bend Locomobile is believed to have last been on public view in the Old Court House Museum in the early 1990s.

Center for History records show that the Locomobile was examined by an auto expert in 1983 and determined to be in fair but nonrunning condition. It was stated that the car would need a total restoration in order to continue on public display. At the time, its value was estimated at $30,000.

The museum staff would like to put the Locomobile back on public display, but that will take work and expense.

The Locomobile is so fragile that “it’s a skeleton of what it was,” Center for History Executive Director Randy Ray said. And that creates a dilemma for museum professionals, he said.

A complete restoration to shiny, 1901 showroom-like condition would require so many new parts that little of the original car would remain, he said.

An alternative would be conservation of the car. Conservation is a careful process designed to stabilize the condition of an object so it can remain on public view, not to make it look like new. “I’d love to have it looking good enough to put on display,” Ray said.

Another possibility would be to sell or give the Locomobile to another museum that has an interest in displaying it, he said. Auctioning it off would be unlikely, because it probably would sell to a private collector and be removed permanently from public view, he said.

“It’s hard for me to say just leave it there (in storage). It’s not doing anyone any good. I’d rather see it go somewhere and be appreciated,” Ray told the South Bend Tribune.

“Very few of those original Locomobiles are still around,” said Tom Kimmel, of Berrien Springs, Mich., president of the Steam Automobile Club of America, when told the South Bend museum owns an early model. “Everybody wants one of those originals.”

Many people still build modern replicas of steam Locomobiles today, he said.

Shuey, the car dealer who sold Martin the car in 1901, was a colorful character who in his early career was part owner of Elbel’s music store. He later operated a river steamboat, the Ben Hamilton, between South Bend and Mishawaka, Ind., but his boat was destroyed by fire in 1897, according to Shuey’s obituary in the Oct. 21, 1924, South Bend Tribune.

In about 1902, Shuey went to Detroit and bought a Ford automobile from Henry Ford, then soon established a Ford dealership and garage in South Bend. He later also served as an agent for Waverly, Oldsmobile, Krit, Apperson and Michell autos.

Shuey gave up the dealership in 1911 and became an occasional taxi driver, according to his obituary. At the time of his death, he had been suffering for four years from injuries he sustained when he was crushed by a car that slid down an incline from a garage’s second floor, according to the article.

Some early news articles state Shuey was the first man in South Bend to own an auto, also a Locomobile, possibly before Leighton Pine did. Frederick G. Collmer, a St. Joseph County resident who died in 1945, also owned an early Locomobile steamer, according to newspaper archives.

It is unknown what became of those other early South Bend Locomobiles.

___

Information from: South Bend Tribune, http://www.southbendtribune.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-27-13 1844GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A 1900 Locomobile. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

A 1900 Locomobile. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Leon Ferrari, 'Serie Errores,' oil and greasy pastel on wood, 39.37 x 47.64 inches, 1990. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and James Lisboa Auction House.

In Memoriam: Argentine artist Leon Ferrari, 92

Leon Ferrari, 'Serie Errores,' oil and greasy pastel on wood, 39.37 x 47.64 inches, 1990. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and James Lisboa Auction House.

Leon Ferrari, ‘Serie Errores,’ oil and greasy pastel on wood, 39.37 x 47.64 inches, 1990. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and James Lisboa Auction House.

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) – Leon Ferrari, a conceptual artist and rights activist who clashed with Pope Francis when he led Argentina’s church and relished provoking dictators, bishops and a world at war, has died at age 92.

Ferrari was buried Friday in his native Buenos Aires, where he created a vast array of artwork during a prolific career.

His most memorable piece may be Western Civilization and Christianity, a Christ figure crucified on the wings of a U.S. jet fighter he made during the Vietnam War. Later, his collages mixed images of Adolph Hitler and Argentina’s military junta with sacred icons of the Roman Catholic Church.

Ferrari happened to die only hours before Francis invoked one of his more memorable phrases during his current tour of Brazil: Speaking to thousands of Argentines in Rio de Janeiro’s central cathedral on Thursday, the pope exhorted the youth not to “put faith in a blender.” He repeated this metaphor several times, saying faith shouldn’t be mixed nor weakened, but taken whole.

Years before he became Pope Francis, Buenos Aires archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio called Ferrari a blasphemer for displaying statues of the Virgin Mary in a blender, little saints in baby bottles, and Christ figures in a toaster. Ferrari’s idea for the 2004 exhibition, mounted next to the historic Recoleta church, was to criticize how he believes religion is force-fed to the masses.

Bergoglio called for the exhibit to be closed and it was, due to violent attacks. Ferrari responded with a missive criticizing the church for the “crimes it committed in Argentina and elsewhere,” and years later, the artist was among a large group of Argentine intellectuals who opposed Bergoglio’s election as pope, calling it “a horror.”

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said he didn’t know if Francis knew of Ferrari’s death, but that regardless, his comments about the blender to Argentine pilgrims on Thursday had nothing to do with the artist.

“I spoke to Argentines familiar with the speech, the pope and Ferrari’s art, and they are certain that his words yesterday had nothing to do with it,” he said.

While Ferrari already had a high profile in Argentina and Brazil, his works drew worldwide attention in recent years, and when he died, he was working on a Guggenheim Fellowship to finish a study of sex and violence in Christian art. He also won the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennial in 2007, and New York’s Museum of Modern Art mounted a retrospective of his work in 2009.

Ferrari was eulogized in Argentine media and by leading figures Friday for the way he mixed politics and poetry, ethics and aesthetics, and managed to show good humor even as he pointed out injustice and horror.

“Leon Ferrari hasn’t left, he’ll stay with us,” said Estela de Carlotto, president of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, remembering her good friend in an interview with the Pagina12 newspaper. “He’s left so much with us that happily he’ll never be forgotten.”

Ferrari’s life’s work is, in fact, enormous. Over nearly seven decades, he created a constant flow of art in nearly all its forms.

Born in Buenos Aires on Sept. 3, 1920, Ferrari earned an engineering degree, but dedicated himself to art. He married Alicia Barros Castro, and they had three sons: Mariali, Pablo and Ariel. He illustrated books and signs for human rights campaigns, and used not only pencils and brushes, but risked his body and life in some very difficult episodes in Argentine history.

In 1975, even before the military coup that launched a cruel dictatorship, Ferrari was part of the Forum for Human Rights and the Movement against Repression and Torture. Forced into Brazilian exile the next year, he couldn’t save his son Ariel, who disappeared in 1977, one of the thousands of Argentines kidnapped and killed by the military state.

When Ferrari returned in 1991, he renewed his focus on injustice, with a particular focus on how the powerful invoke divine support.

Ferrari reflected on his relationship with the public when he visited one of his exhibitions, “Heliographs” and “Never Again,” in 2007.

“I had a period not so long ago when I wanted to be understood by everyone,” he said, according to his website. “Then I realized that the rational side, this kind of everyday craziness in which everything appears normal, was impossible,” he added. “Man is very small, and within him, he’s mostly subjective—as as with love, or a secret.”

___

Associated Press Writer Nicole Winfield contributed from Rio de Janeiro.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-26-13 2352GMT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Leon Ferrari, 'Serie Errores,' oil and greasy pastel on wood, 39.37 x 47.64 inches, 1990. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and James Lisboa Auction House.

Leon Ferrari, ‘Serie Errores,’ oil and greasy pastel on wood, 39.37 x 47.64 inches, 1990. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and James Lisboa Auction House.

Frederic Remington's 'Cutting Out Pony Herds' (1908), oil on canvas, 27 × 40 inches, sold for $5.6 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d'Alene Art Auction.

Remington painting sells for $5.6M at Western art auction

Frederic Remington's 'Cutting Out Pony Herds' (1908), oil on canvas, 27 × 40 inches, sold for $5.6 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d'Alene Art Auction.

Frederic Remington’s ‘Cutting Out Pony Herds’ (1908), oil on canvas, 27 × 40 inches, sold for $5.6 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d’Alene Art Auction.

RENO, Nev. (AP) – A Frederic Remington painting depicting U.S. Cavalry soldiers has fetched $5.6 million and a Norman Rockwell painting featuring a Boy Scout has drawn $4.2 million at an auction in Reno.

Mike Overby of the annual Coeur d’Alene Art Auction says Remington’s Cutting Out Pony Herds and Rockwell’s A Scout is Loyal were sold to private collectors on Saturday.

Remington’s painting features a soldier charging across the plains on horseback with the rest of the Cavalry following behind. One of his last works, it was done in 1908, a year before he died.

Rockwell’s 1940 painting has a patriotic theme with a Boy Scout standing in front of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Rockwell was known for his work for the Boy Scouts of America, producing covers for their magazine and calendars.

Some 600 bidders took part in what’s billed as the world’s largest Western art sale. Over 300 works were sold for a total of $28.5 million, up from $17.2 million last year.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Frederic Remington's 'Cutting Out Pony Herds' (1908), oil on canvas, 27 × 40 inches, sold for $5.6 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d'Alene Art Auction.

Frederic Remington’s ‘Cutting Out Pony Herds’ (1908), oil on canvas, 27 × 40 inches, sold for $5.6 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d’Alene Art Auction.

Norman Rockwell (1894–1978), 'A Scout is Loyal' (1940), oil on canvas, 39 × 27 inches, price realized: $4.2 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d'Alene Art Auction.

Norman Rockwell (1894–1978), ‘A Scout is Loyal’ (1940), oil on canvas, 39 × 27 inches, price realized: $4.2 million. Image courtesy of Coeur d’Alene Art Auction.

Eagle Harbor Lighthouse at Eagle Harbor, Mich. Image by Keweenaw Tourism Council, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Lake Superior lighthouse now lifesaving station museum

Eagle Harbor Lighthouse at Eagle Harbor, Mich. Image by Keweenaw Tourism Council, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Eagle Harbor Lighthouse at Eagle Harbor, Mich. Image by Keweenaw Tourism Council, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

EAGLE HARBOR, Mich. (AP) – A former U.S. Coast Guard lifesaving station in Keweenaw County that played a role in hundreds of Lake Superior rescue missions has been converted into a museum.

Descendants of Coast Guard personnel who served at the station in Eagle Harbor attended a grand opening ceremony this month, honoring those who risked their lives to protect imperiled boaters.

The station was established in 1912 and operated until 1950. The current building was constructed in 1939 and is filled with artifacts for the public to see.

“Not only do we have memorabilia that we’ve collected, but we also have the physical items, the surfboats that they used, the equipment that they used,” Mark Rowe, maritime chairman for the Keweenaw County Historical Society, told WLUC-TV.

One of the most notable rescues was the saving of the L.C. Waldo shipwreck crew in 1913. The steamer ran aground at the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula in Michigan’s far northwestern Upper Peninsula. Surfmen from the Eagle Harbor and Portage Canal lifesaving stations rescued 22 men, two women and a dog and received the rare Life Saving Gold Medal for their efforts.

“They had a horrific snowstorm blowing through, 50 to 70 mile an hour winds, 24 degree air temperature, freezing spray, and these surfmen took the challenge, and they went out in the lake and they saved the shipwreck crew,” Rowe said.

One of the rescuers was Anthony Glaza, whose grandson, Timothy Glaza, donated his medal to the museum during the grand opening.

“It’s been a part of our family folklore forever to hear and to retell the story of Grandpa Tony’s time here and his participation in the rescue of the Waldo,” Glaza said.

___

Information from: WLUC-TV, http://www.wluctv6.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-28-13 0812GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Eagle Harbor Lighthouse at Eagle Harbor, Mich. Image by Keweenaw Tourism Council, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Eagle Harbor Lighthouse at Eagle Harbor, Mich. Image by Keweenaw Tourism Council, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

‘Skewville, Welcome to Greenpoint BK,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

Reading the Streets: On the waterfront at Greenpoint

‘Skewville, Welcome to Greenpoint BK,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

‘Skewville, Welcome to Greenpoint BK,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

NEW YORK – Greenpoint’s waterfront was once a sleepy collection of warehouses and a spot to see Manhattan’s skyline, but just as the neighborhood has attracted increased attention, so has its waterfront. There’s now a ferry terminal next to those giant warehouses, and how one can visit the neighborhood without first checking the temperamental whims of the G train. Since 2009, the India Street Mural Project has welcomed visitors to the waterfront with a series of murals by six artists.

Contributions vary widely. First, there’s the seemingly straightforward “Welcome to BK” by Skewville on one wall, which on closer inspection reveals a man wearing an eye patch and an enigmatic look on the B, and a group of children wearing bright red hats on the K. Perhaps they are some of the people visitors can expect to meet when they get off the ferry?

Moving away from the water is Ali Asch’s “Untitled,” in shades of pale blue and sea-foam green. There are three people on a boat doing backbends all in a row, like cheerleaders. Each of them hosts another group of kids playing at a table balancing on their stomachs. The sea part of mural is quite relaxing, though the flexible boat owners are a reminder of exactly how inflexible I am, and how I couldn’t balance a small group of children on my stomach.

Closer to the street than the water is a neon pink rocket (or spaceship) rising out of gray clouds, with orange flames. Since I’d hate to think that anything that pink was being used for violence, I choose to believe it’s a spaceship, going to a new planet, hopefully near Greenpoint full of equally fluorescent structures.

The India Street Mural Project was sponsored by the North Brooklyn Art Coalition and the office of council member David Yassky. It aims to bring some artistic life to the industrial space.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


‘Skewville, Welcome to Greenpoint BK,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

‘Skewville, Welcome to Greenpoint BK,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

Joseph Meloy at the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novic.

Joseph Meloy at the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novic.

Eve Biddle and Joshua Frankel, ‘India Street Rocket’ at the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via AnimalNY.com

Eve Biddle and Joshua Frankel, ‘India Street Rocket’ at the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via AnimalNY.com

Ali Aschman, ‘Untitled,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

Ali Aschman, ‘Untitled,’ the India Street Mural Project, New York City. Photo via greenpointnews.com

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Metropolitan Museum of Art image.

Met to sponsor Global Museum Leaders Colloquium in April

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Metropolitan Museum of Art image.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Metropolitan Museum of Art image.

NEW YORK – The Metropolitan Museum of Art will launch the Global Museum Leaders Colloquium in April 2014, a two-week pilot program created and hosted by the museum.

Designed to stimulate and broaden international dialogue on museum management and collections care among directors from collecting institutions, it will bring together 12-15 directors, in particular from museums in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The colloquium will take place April 7-18.

“The Met was founded as an international museum 143 years ago, and this global approach is now reflected in our collections, programs, and audience. Given the breadth and depth of our holdings, it is our responsibility to encourage a dialogue that can benefit museums worldwide, one that reinforces their relevance and encourages their appropriate stewardship,” said Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum. “The Global Museum Leaders Colloquium has been designed specifically to address a broad range of museum management issues, and we look forward to welcoming our colleagues to the Met next spring.”

The program will include directors of institutions with collections ranging from archaeological and historic artifacts to modern and contemporary art. Participants will be meeting with the Met’s curators, conservators and administrative staff and also participating in intensive dialogues about museum management.

The series of sessions held during the 12 working days of the colloquium will offer an overview of various aspects of museum operations—from curatorial research, collections management, and conservation to fundraising, education, governance and digital communications—providing a 360-degree view of current museum practices.

A significant portion of the schedule will also be set aside for open dialogue among the visiting directors, who will discuss strategic challenges facing their institutions and engage in workshops to explore timely issues confronting museums worldwide, such as how to formulate cooperative policies and how to advocate effectively for institutions at a time of scarce resources.

At a time when globalization is rapidly reshaping museum audiences as well as programming mandates, the colloquium has been created to promote strong, well-informed, culturally sensitive museum leadership. A key aim of the program will be enhanced international collaboration for all of the participating institutions and their leaders.

Participation in the Global Museum Leaders Colloquium is by invitation. Most participants will be museum directors, although in some cases the program will accept deputy directors or chief curators who have oversight responsibility for their institutions, as well as public officials with jurisdiction over museums.

The 2014 participants of the program will be announced by November of this year.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Metropolitan Museum of Art image.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Metropolitan Museum of Art image.

Museum of Contemporary Art at 250 S. Grand Avenue in Los Angeles, Wikipedia image attributed to Oxxo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license.

Director of LA’s contemporary art museum resigns

Museum of Contemporary Art at 250 S. Grand Avenue in Los Angeles, Wikipedia image attributed to Oxxo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license.

Museum of Contemporary Art at 250 S. Grand Avenue in Los Angeles, Wikipedia image attributed to Oxxo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license.

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Jeffrey Deitch, the sometimes controversial director of Los Angeles’ Museum of Contemporary Art, announced Wednesday he is resigning.

Deitch made the announcement at a meeting of his board of directors, adding he plans to stay on until an ambitious campaign to raise MOCA’s endowment from $20 million to $100 million is completed. That’s expected to happen this fall.

In the meantime, the board formed a committee to look for a successor.

“As colleagues, friends and great admirers of Jeffrey’s talent, we respect his decision and thank him for his tremendous dedication to the museum and all those who value MOCA,” David G. Johnson, co-chairman of the board, said in a statement released by MOCA.

The announcement was not surprising. Although Johnson hailed Deitch for helping “solidify MOCA’s financial stability while changing the way Angelenos, and those around the world, engage with contemporary art,” the director had come under sometimes withering criticism since his arrival in 2010.

His signature achievement, the museum’s “Art in The Streets” show, featuring the works of Banksy, Shepard Fairey and other graffiti artists, drew record crowds in 2011. But other exhibitions, including one featuring the works of actor Dennis Hopper and another curated by actor James Franco, were dismissed as lowbrow.

He also alienated some in the art community with last year’s dismissal of longtime MOCA curator Paul Schimmel. The action prompted Ed Ruscha, John Baldessari and other prominent artists to resign from MOCA’s board.

Deitch was a surprise choice to some when he was hired in 2010. As the operator of Deitch Projects, he was a prominent New York gallery owner and consultant to collectors, but hadn’t worked in museums.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-25-13 0056GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Museum of Contemporary Art at 250 S. Grand Avenue in Los Angeles, Wikipedia image attributed to Oxxo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license.

Museum of Contemporary Art at 250 S. Grand Avenue in Los Angeles, Wikipedia image attributed to Oxxo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license.

The entrance to the 1931 Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway at 49th Street in Manhattan. Image by Americasroof at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Musical tenants sought for landmark NYC building

The entrance to the 1931 Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway at 49th Street in Manhattan. Image by Americasroof at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The entrance to the 1931 Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway at 49th Street in Manhattan. Image by Americasroof at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NEW YORK (AP) – A new owner is seeking tenants for a landmark New York City building where generations of songwriters peddled their wares to music publishers.

The New York Times reports that the Brill Building is now half empty since the closing of the sheet music store Colony Records and a post-production studio.

Real estate investor Eric Hader paid $185 million for the 11-story mid-Manhattan building in February. He tells The Times he believes he can breathe new life into the building by evoking its show business past.

For starters, the Times says Hader is in discussions with the Songwriters Hall of Fame about establishing a small museum in the building.

Famous names associated with the Brill Building include Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington and Carole King.

___

Information from: The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-25-13 1320GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The entrance to the 1931 Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway at 49th Street in Manhattan. Image by Americasroof at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The entrance to the 1931 Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway at 49th Street in Manhattan. Image by Americasroof at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.