15th century early Ming Dynasty gilt-bronze Bodhisattva, 9-7/8 inches, the auction’s top lot, sold online for $350,000. I.M. Chait image

I.M. Chait March 23 Post-Asia Week Auction realizes $2.3M

15th century early Ming Dynasty gilt-bronze Bodhisattva, 9-7/8 inches, the auction’s top lot, sold online for $350,000. I.M. Chait image

15th century early Ming Dynasty gilt-bronze Bodhisattva, 9-7/8 inches, the auction’s top lot, sold online for $350,000. I.M. Chait image

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – While traditional Asian art categories held on to their most-favored status at I.M. Chait’s March 23, 2014 Post-Asia Week Auction, other buying trends were noted at the $2.36 million sale that would indicate collectors are exploring new avenues. All prices quoted are inclusive of a 22% buyer’s premium; LiveAuctioneers provided the Internet live-bidding services.

“Clearly, Asian art collectors are expanding their horizons beyond the antique ceramics, jade and bronze that have been so highly prized over the years,” said Joshua Chait, operations manager at I.M. Chait. “A prime example is the 16-piece carved ruby matrix tea set that was entered in our auction with a $160,000-$180,000 estimate. It was not just a tea set; it was a flawless artwork, and collectors recognized it as such. It sold for $219,600.”

Embellished with gilt mountings and accents, the set included a covered teapot with a carved dragon inside, a chocolate/water pot, creamer, four claw-foot shallow dishes, four dragon-form teacups, serving accessories and a carved dragon centerpiece. A thick ruby zoisite freeform slab served as the tray.

The top lot of the sale was a superb 15th century early Ming Dynasty Xuande Mark and Period gilt-bronze Bodhisattva. The 9 7/8-inch figure elaborately decorated with cast “jewelry,” headdress and other adornments was chosen as the cover image for Chait’s printed catalog. It reached the high end of its estimate range, selling to an online buyer for $350,000.

Another category that showed strength was Chinese calligraphic scrolls and art. A striking ink-on-paper calligraphy by Wu Changshuo (1844-1927), signed with four seals of the artist and one collector’s seal of Chongsog (Pyong-U-Min), was bid to $73,200 against an estimate of $15,000-$20,000. Also having provenance from the prestigious Songwon Collection, a Chinese calligraphic couplet by Zhang Daqian, signed and dated July 1978, with two seals of the artist, soared past its $15,000-$20,000 estimate to reach $67,100.

A serene Chinese landscape painting on silk by Pu Ru (1896-1963), ex Songwon Collection, depicted craggy mountains, trees and a figure navigating a boat. It more than doubled its high estimate to achieve $48,800.

“It was a very busy sale with a lot of action from all sources,” said Chait. “There was a good mix of nationalities among bidders, but most who prevailed on the higher-priced lots were from Asia. We were very pleased that so many people in the room had flown in specifically for the sale. Some had attended Asia Week in New York and made a special stop en route home just to attend. We anticipated this would be the case and left no stone unturned in producing an auction that would meet, if not surpass, their expectations.”

This is the second year in which I.M. Chait has chosen to conduct its Asia Week Auction from their West Coast gallery, rather than at a Manhattan venue. “It has worked extremely well for us, and our clients have responded very favorably. We plan to continue this new policy going forward,” Chait said.

I.M. Chait’s next auction is slated for April 13 and will feature Asian art, antiques and estate items. The firm’s Asian & International Fine Arts Auction will take place on May 18. For additional information, visit the Chait website at www.chait.com or call 1-800-775-5020 or 310-285-0182; email joey@chait.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog from I.M. Chait’s March 23 Post-Asia Week auction, complete with prices realized, online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


15th century early Ming Dynasty gilt-bronze Bodhisattva, 9-7/8 inches, the auction’s top lot, sold online for $350,000. I.M. Chait image

15th century early Ming Dynasty gilt-bronze Bodhisattva, 9-7/8 inches, the auction’s top lot, sold online for $350,000. I.M. Chait image

Exquisite 16-piece carved ruby matrix dragon tea set with gilt mountings and accents, $219,600. I.M. Chait image

Exquisite 16-piece carved ruby matrix dragon tea set with gilt mountings and accents, $219,600. I.M. Chait image

Chinese ink-on-paper calligraphy by Wu Changshuo (1844-1927), signed with four seals of the artist and one collector’s seal of Chongsog (Pyong-U-Min), $73,200. I.M. Chait image

Chinese ink-on-paper calligraphy by Wu Changshuo (1844-1927), signed with four seals of the artist and one collector’s seal of Chongsog (Pyong-U-Min), $73,200. I.M. Chait image

Chinese calligraphic couplet by Zhang Daqian, signed and dated July 1978, with two seals of the artist, $67,100.

Chinese calligraphic couplet by Zhang Daqian, signed and dated July 1978, with two seals of the artist, $67,100.

Chinese ink and color on silk landscape painting by Pu Ru. Provenance: The Songwon Collection, from Young-Ig Min and Pyong-U Min family, $48,800. I.M. Chait image

Chinese ink and color on silk landscape painting by Pu Ru. Provenance: The Songwon Collection, from Young-Ig Min and Pyong-U Min family, $48,800. I.M. Chait image

'Hard Wear (Tongue Gilding),' 2006, Lauren Kalman. Inkjet print, acrylic lamination, 33 x 24 in. (83.8 x 61.0 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Sienna Patti. Photo credit: Lauren Kalman.

Exhibit explores interplay of jewelry design, photography

'Hard Wear (Tongue Gilding),' 2006, Lauren Kalman. Inkjet print, acrylic lamination, 33 x 24 in. (83.8 x 61.0 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Sienna Patti. Photo credit: Lauren Kalman.

‘Hard Wear (Tongue Gilding),’ 2006, Lauren Kalman. Inkjet print, acrylic lamination, 33 x 24 in. (83.8 x 61.0 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Sienna Patti. Photo credit: Lauren Kalman.

NEW YORK – “Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography,” on view at the Museum of Arts and Design from May 13 to Sept. 14, is the first museum exhibition to examine how contemporary jewelry artists are using photography to explore issues central to contemporary experience.

Avenues explored include changing views of beauty and the human body; social, political, and cultural issues; memory and desire; and the relationship of jewelry to society and personal identity.

Today’s revolution in image creation, manipulation, and transmission has served as a catalyst for the artists featured in “Multiple Exposures” to take a serious look at the pictures in our lives—the daguerreotypes, tintypes, and Kodachromes inherited from earlier times, as well as the digital images currently streaming from our cameras, computers, and smart phones. Focusing on contemporary works and featuring 170 objects, “Multiple Exposures” not only provides historical context for this evolving 150-year-old relationship, but also delves into recent developments in contemporary photo-jewelry through cutting-edge videos and installations.

More than 80 renowned artists from over 20 countries are represented in the exhibition, including Gijs Bakker, Wafaa Bilal, Mari Ishikawa, Jiro Kamata, Sooyeon Kim, Otto Künzli, Iris Nieuwenburg, Kara Ross, Gabriela Sánchez y Sánchez de la Barquera, Bernard Schobinger, Bettina Speckner, Joyce Scott, Kiff Slemmons, Andy Warhol and Noa Zilberman.

“’Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography offers the first rigorous survey and exploration of the deep and multifaceted relationship between these two mediums,” said Glenn Adamson, MAD’s director. “The exhibition gives viewers the opportunity to engage with contemporary artists who push the boundaries of one field using the other, reinvigorating familiar forms while inventing new ones.”

“In spite of their distinct histories and traits, or perhaps because of them, the fusion of these two mediums has resulted in a potent synergy that has reshaped jewelry,” said Ursula Ilse-Neuman, MAD’s curator of jewelry. “Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography captures the artistic strength embodied in this dynamic combination of object and image.”

The exhibition is loosely organized around the following thematic threads: Identity and Representation, in which artists push the boundaries of portrait jewelry using images of family and friends, the celebrated and notorious, as well as anonymous individuals whose histories have been lost in time; The Body, featuring the changing concepts of beauty and imperfection of the human form as well as its interior; Landscape, architecture and their symbolic content; Appropriation, in which artists hijack and transform iconic imagery from the fine arts and popular culture as a way to comment on contemporary concerns; Tributes to cameras and photographic paraphernalia, featuring the imaginative and unexpectedly wearable pieces of jewelry created from dismantled camera components; and finally Jewelry Beyond the Object—its social and cultural significance beyond function and conventions – expressed through cutting-edge videos and photographs.

Context for the contemporary pieces in the exhibition is provided by 19th-century photo-jewelry featuring daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes, as well as trench jewelry from the First and Second World Wars, many exhibited for the first time.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


'Hard Wear (Tongue Gilding),' 2006, Lauren Kalman. Inkjet print, acrylic lamination, 33 x 24 in. (83.8 x 61.0 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Sienna Patti. Photo credit: Lauren Kalman.

‘Hard Wear (Tongue Gilding),’ 2006, Lauren Kalman. Inkjet print, acrylic lamination, 33 x 24 in. (83.8 x 61.0 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Sienna Patti. Photo credit: Lauren Kalman.

Eye miniature brooch, ca. 1845, artist unknown, watercolor on ivory, gold, pearls, glass. Collection of Cathy Gordon. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Cathy Gordon.

Eye miniature brooch, ca. 1845, artist unknown, watercolor on ivory, gold, pearls, glass. Collection of Cathy Gordon. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Cathy Gordon.

The Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Delaware Art Museum to sell works to repay debt

The Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) – The Delaware Art Museum says it will sell a few pieces of art to raise money to repay its bond debt and replenish its endowment.

Museum CEO Mike Miller said Wednesday in a news release that the museum would sell up to four works of art valued at $30 million. He did not identify the pieces.

He says the museum faced the choice of selling works of art or closing.

The News Journal of Wilmington reports proceeds from the sales will go to repay the balance of the museum’s $19.8 million bond debt, left over from a 2005 expansion.

The endowment would be replenished by about $10 million.

The sale of the art is expected within six months.

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Information from: The News Journal of Wilmington, Del., http://www.delawareonline.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-26-14 1909GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

'Sandy,' an 18-inch sandstone sculpture from the Mississippian Period, has been named the state artifact of Tennessee. McClung Museum image.

Prehistoric statue ‘Sandy’ made official Tenn. state artifact

'Sandy,' an 18-inch sandstone sculpture from the Mississippian Period, has been named the state artifact of Tennessee. McClung Museum image.

‘Sandy,’ an 18-inch sandstone sculpture from the Mississippian Period, has been named the state artifact of Tennessee. McClung Museum image.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A prehistoric Native American sandstone statue called Sandy is now the official state artifact of Tennessee.

The 18-inch-high statue depicts a male figure on one knee. It was found in 1939 at a Wilson County farm along with a companion female statue. The two statues are thought to represent chiefly ancestors, either real or mythological.

Similar statue pairs have been found across the South and Midwest, but Sandy and his partner are particularly noted for their realism and workmanship.

Sandy was carved between A.D. 1000 and 1350 and is from the Mississippian Period.

The statue is part of the permanent collections at the University of Tennessee’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-27-14 0734GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


'Sandy,' an 18-inch sandstone sculpture from the Mississippian Period, has been named the state artifact of Tennessee. McClung Museum image.

‘Sandy,’ an 18-inch sandstone sculpture from the Mississippian Period, has been named the state artifact of Tennessee. McClung Museum image.

The recovered Torah Ark curtain went missing from the Jewish Museum’s collection sometime in the mid-1950s. Image courtesy of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

Stolen synagogue textile returns to Prague from US

The recovered Torah Ark curtain went missing from the Jewish Museum’s collection sometime in the mid-1950s. Image courtesy of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

The recovered Torah Ark curtain went missing from the Jewish Museum’s collection sometime in the mid-1950s. Image courtesy of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

PRAGUE (AP) – A 19th-century synagogue textile stolen by the Nazis has returned to the Czech Republic after being discovered in the United States last year, officials said Wednesday.

The textile dates to 1855 and belonged to the Jewish community in the town of Mlada Vozice, 50 kilometers south of Prague. It is believed to have been used in the local synagogue, which no longer exists.

It was confiscated by the Nazis in 1943 during Czechoslovakia’s occupation by Hitler’s troops. The Nazis gathered items from Jewish communities at a depository in Prague before killing Jewish residents in death camps.

None of the 68 Jews who lived in Mlada Vozice survived the Holocaust. Most died in the Nazis’ Auschwitz and Maly Trostinec camps.

The textile’s whereabouts have been unknown for almost 60 years. It was discovered by curators of Prague’s Jewish Museum in 2013 in the U.S. shortly before Sotheby’s was to put it up for auction in New York among more than 400 other Jewish treasures in April.

Officials at the Jewish Museum, where the textile was kept after the war, said it disappeared under unclear but likely illegal circumstances in 1956 along with other pieces from the museum’s collection.

Jana Havlikova of the museum said the agreement to return the piece to the country included no financial compensation.

“It is an example to follow,” said Petr Papousek, head of the Federation of Jewish Communities in the Czech Republic.

Papousek said the textile is priceless for Czech Jews because “we can identify it with the people who were murdered in the death camps.”

According to the museum and Jewish federation officials, it is the first time a ceremonial Jewish piece that was stolen during the Holocaust has been traced abroad and returned to the country.

It will go on display at the Prague museum starting April 24.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-26-14 1634GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The recovered Torah Ark curtain went missing from the Jewish Museum’s collection sometime in the mid-1950s. Image courtesy of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

The recovered Torah Ark curtain went missing from the Jewish Museum’s collection sometime in the mid-1950s. Image courtesy of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

Hopi distance runner Louis Tewanima, silver medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 1912 Olympics. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Ex-Hopi chairman charged with theft of Olympian’s bust

Hopi distance runner Louis Tewanima, silver medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 1912 Olympics. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Hopi distance runner Louis Tewanima, silver medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 1912 Olympics. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – A former Hopi Tribe chairman has been charged with stealing a bronze bust of his grandfather, one of Indian Country’s most famous athletes, from a museum.

A criminal complaint filed in Hopi tribal court alleges that Ben Nuvamsa took the bust of two-time Olympic distance runner Louis Tewanima without permission from the museum on the northeastern Arizona reservation.

Nuvamsa contends the charge is frivolous and said he had permission to pick up the bust in August for display at an annual Labor Day weekend race that honors Tewanima, a silver medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 1912 Olympics.

“If anything, it belongs to the people,” said Nuvamsa, who lives in Pinetop. “Every year we celebrate his accomplishments, and people need to see it.”

Museum manager Anna Silas declined to comment.

Nuvamsa is scheduled to be arraigned on the theft charge next month. A warrant that was issued for his arrest was quashed Wednesday because authorities had the wrong address on file and he was not served with the complaint.

The bust, valued at $8,000, sits in a police evidence room after being recovered from a property on the Hopi reservation, said U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs police Lt. Gibson Namoki. He declined further comment, citing the unresolved case.

The history of the bust is unclear. The criminal complaint says it belongs to a museum near the village of Shungopavi. But Nuvamsa contends the sculpture should be in the hands of Tewanima’s family.

Nuvamsa said Silas was not at the museum when he arrived to pick up the bust on behalf of the race organizers, who had displayed it in the past. But he said her brother led him to the sculpture and helped him load it into his truck. Nuvamsa said he then dropped off the bust with Tewanima’s other relatives. Tewanima died in 1969 but remains a source of inspiration for Hopi runners.

Nuvamsa left the chairman’s office in late 2009, less than two years after he was sworn in following a special election. His time in office was marked by political chaos and ended in his resignation and that of the vice chairman.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-27-14 0024GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Hopi distance runner Louis Tewanima, silver medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 1912 Olympics. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Hopi distance runner Louis Tewanima, silver medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 1912 Olympics. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

'On the Shore of the Seine.' an 1879 oil painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Long-lost Renoir painting returns to Baltimore museum

'On the Shore of the Seine.' an 1879 oil painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

‘On the Shore of the Seine.’ an 1879 oil painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

BALTIMORE (AP) – A Renoir painting returns to public display this weekend for the first time in more than 60 years since it was stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s painting On the Shore of the Seine, dated about 1879, became the subject of a dramatic legal dispute after a Virginia woman claimed she bought it at a flea market for $7. Others, including her brother, disputed the story.

Now that a judge has awarded ownership of the small painting to the Baltimore museum, it will be the centerpiece of a special exhibition March 30 through July 20.

The exhibition, “The Renoir Returns,” will reunite the small painting with more than 20 other artworks from the collection of Baltimore arts patron Saidie May. She bequeathed her collection to the museum.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-27-14 0619GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


'On the Shore of the Seine.' an 1879 oil painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

‘On the Shore of the Seine.’ an 1879 oil painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Chicago's Drake Hotel, pictured on a 1920s postcard, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Chicago’s Drake hotel offers amnesty to petty thieves

Chicago's Drake Hotel, pictured on a 1920s postcard, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Chicago’s Drake Hotel, pictured on a 1920s postcard, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

CHICAGO (AP) – If you ever stole anything from Chicago’s Drake Hotel, you can give it back with no questions asked.

Officials at the Drake say countless items have been stolen since the hotel opened in 1920, and not just towels. They have launched an amnesty program they call, “Go Back in Time, Give Back the Crime.”

Hotel officials say the items can be returned by mail or in person, “without guilt or suspicion.”

Since its opening The Drake has hosted many royals, including Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana. Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and President Ronald Reagan also stayed there.

The hotel says the stolen items, memorabilia and stories about its famous guests will be part of a history tour of the hotel this spring.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-27-14 0821GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Chicago's Drake Hotel, pictured on a 1920s postcard, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Chicago’s Drake Hotel, pictured on a 1920s postcard, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Pillar-and-scroll shelf clock by Elisha Hotchkiss with original woodworks and image of Andrew Jackson on horseback. Mosby & Co. image

Americana, historical & ethnographic featured at Mosby’s, Apr. 18

Pillar-and-scroll shelf clock by Elisha Hotchkiss with original woodworks and image of Andrew Jackson on horseback. Mosby & Co. image

Pillar-and-scroll shelf clock by Elisha Hotchkiss with original woodworks and image of Andrew Jackson on horseback. Mosby & Co. image

FREDERICK, Md. – A mid-19th century Sharps Model 1855 carbine (or short-barrel rifle), a Civil War-era inscribed and dated presentation grade sword, and a pair of circa-1800 four-barrel “duck’s foot” pistols are expected headliners at an auction slated for Friday, April 18 at Mosby & Co.’s Frederick, Md., gallery. The start time is 4 p.m. (EST), and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Militaria and weaponry are just one component of the auction, which will feature nearly 300 lots of historical items, Americana, ethnographic antiques (mostly African, Oceanic, pre-Columbian and American Indian) and quality decorative arts.

“This will be a solid, diverse sale, one with strengths across every category,” said Keith Spurgeon, owner of Mosby & Co. “There is something for every taste and budget, from a few dollars to several thousand dollars.” Spurgeon had high praise for the large and fine selection of ethnographic arts and artifacts, most of which came from prominent collections in Maryland and New York.

The Civil War-era Sharps Model 1855 short-barrel carbine is exceedingly rare because it is one of only 600 U.S. martially marked carbines made by Sharps. The carbine was issued to the 1st California Dragoons and the 2nd Texas Dragoons. The example being sold has remained in the same collection dating since the 1960s.

The pair of “duck’s foot” pistols – so-named because of their four splayed barrels – are English made and were used by British Naval personnel during the Napoleonic Wars. They, too, are quite rare, and are considered high grade and in superb condition. A similar pistol, but in lesser condition, was recently auctioned for approximately $12,000.

The Civil War presentation grade officer’s sword is inscribed, “Presented to Edward Lounsbery First Lt. Company B, 179th Regiment, New York Volunteers by the members of his company Petersburgh, Virginia, February 10, 1865.” The sword was presented in battlefield conditions. Petersburg was still under siege at the time, but it finally fell to Union forces in April of 1865.

Other antique firearms that will cross the auction block on April 18th include a Civil War-era Tower Enfield musket – a British import that was used by both the North and the South – with a lockplate dated 1860, and a superb-condition Eli Whitney pistol, also from the Civil War era, that has remained in the same family since the 1890s.

Oceanic art, mainly from New Guinea and other Indonesian islands, will feature ancestor and fertility figures, including a scarce ancestral carved wood figure from Raja Island, located off Indonesia. It depicts a man wearing a headdress with outstretched arms. The selection also includes early 20th-century war clubs from Fiji and the Solomon Islands, one having a carved notch in it, indicating a kill mark.

Other top Oceanic lots include: a 19th-century Indonesian Dayak interior door panel (for use in a long house) with a carved image of the Indonesian spirit guide a pair of early 20th-century Sepik River, Papua New Guinea, carved wood suspension hooks – one of them a rare double hook), an uncommon and nicely carved 19th-century New Zealand Maori canoe bailer with excellent provenance dating to the 1890s, and a 19th-century swing with figures.

African objects include masks from various tribes and the Democratic Republic of Congo. A Senufo mask from Mali is especially appealing, with a chameleon figure carved onto the forehead area. Additionally, the grouping includes a mid-20th-century Nigerian polychromed wood Ibibio headdress, and a late-19th or early 20th-century Dogan carved-wood figure from Mali depicting a warrior on horseback.

Pre-Columbian art includes a Chimu-Inca woven mantle (900-1300 A.D.), an exceptional Mayan Arawak Caribbean Indian tribe Palma celt (or carved stone tool), a desirable carved-stone Chontal mask from Mexico, and many other rare objects.

From the Americas comes a pot signed by the well-known Hopi potter Sylvia Naha (a k a Feather Woman, 1951-1999), decorated with a traditional geometric design; and a fine Haida bowl in the form of a seal, made in the Pacific Northwest or southern Canada. Also, prehistoric pottery pieces and Woodlands Indians items will be auctioned.

The Americana and decorative arts category is led by a circa-1825 walnut with fruitwood veneer Baltimore secretary, an 1883 marble relief sculpture depicting a nymph with cherubs, signed P.J. Seymour; and 19th-century beer steins, including Mettlachs. Also to be sold are a pillar-and-scroll shelf clock by Elisha Hotchkiss, with original woodworks and reverse-on-glass image of Andrew Jackson on horseback, a folk art painted chest, and parlor stove with Minton tiles.

Rounding out the day’s offerings will be original souvenir programs and press photos from Cassius Clay and Sonny Liston’s first fight in Miami Beach (February 1964), and an original English program and poster for the 1975 Ali-Joe Frazier “Thrilla in Manila” fight, with artwork by LeRoy Neiman.

For additional information on any item in the auction, call 240-629-8139 or email keith@mosbyauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Pillar-and-scroll shelf clock by Elisha Hotchkiss with original woodworks and image of Andrew Jackson on horseback. Mosby & Co. image

Pillar-and-scroll shelf clock by Elisha Hotchkiss with original woodworks and image of Andrew Jackson on horseback. Mosby & Co. image

Mid-19th-century M1855 Sharps carbine and one of two “duck's foot” pistols in the auction. Mosby & Co. image

Mid-19th-century M1855 Sharps carbine and one of two “duck’s foot” pistols in the auction. Mosby & Co. image

Civil War-era presentation grade sword, inscribed to First Lt. Edward Lounsbery of New York. Mosby & Co. image

Civil War-era presentation grade sword, inscribed to First Lt. Edward Lounsbery of New York. Mosby & Co. image

Rare 19th-century Maori canoe bailer, collected by Rev. Alfred Fairbrother, Baptist minister to the Maoris (1882-1885). Mosby & Co. image

Rare 19th-century Maori canoe bailer, collected by Rev. Alfred Fairbrother, Baptist minister to the Maoris (1882-1885). Mosby & Co. image

Chimu-Inca mantle depicting warriors holding severed heads, made circa 900-1300 A.D. Mosby & Co. image

Chimu-Inca mantle depicting warriors holding severed heads, made circa 900-1300 A.D. Mosby & Co. image

Circa-1825 American secretary from Baltimore, walnut with fruitwood-veneer drawers, 90 inches tall, fine condition. Mosby & Co. image

Circa-1825 American secretary from Baltimore, walnut with fruitwood-veneer drawers, 90 inches tall, fine condition. Mosby & Co. image

19th-century Indonesian ‘swing’ with figures. Mosby & Co. image

19th-century Indonesian ‘swing’ with figures. Mosby & Co. image

Hopi pot crafted by the noted artisan Sylvia Naha, a k a Feather Woman (1951-1999), 4¾ inches tall. Mosby & Co. image

Hopi pot crafted by the noted artisan Sylvia Naha, a k a Feather Woman (1951-1999), 4¾ inches tall. Mosby & Co. image

A Baule mask from the Ivory Coast and a Bamana hyena mask from Mali. Mosby & Co. image

A Baule mask from the Ivory Coast and a Bamana hyena mask from Mali. Mosby & Co. image

Pre-Columbian carved stone bowl (Argentina, circa 200 BC) and a carved stone Chontal mask from Mexico. Mosby & Co. image

Pre-Columbian carved stone bowl (Argentina, circa 200 BC) and a carved stone Chontal mask from Mexico. Mosby & Co. image

Australia ready to return ancient statues to India

SYDNEY (AFP) – Australia is preparing to return two centuries-old statues to India, officials said Thursday, following allegations they were stolen from ancient sites and sold as part of an audacious art fraud.

The National Gallery of Australia’s bronze sculpture of a dancing Shiva, purchased in 2008 from New York art and antiquities dealer Subhash Kapoor, was pulled from display in Canberra on Monday.

A lesser work also linked to Kapoor, the Ardhanariswara idol held by the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, has also been removed, the Attorney-General’s Department said in a statement.

India requested the works’ return on Friday and Australia, as a signatory to a UNESCO convention on the illicit import, export and transfer of ownership of cultural property, will implement its obligations under its Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act, it said.

“The Indian government’s request is being actioned in accordance with that Act,” the statement said.

The request from India follows a decision by the National Gallery of Australia to sue Kapoor, his firm Art of the Past, and former manager Aaron Freedman in New York’s Supreme Court over the purchase.

The NGA has claimed that Kapoor and his company “fraudulently induced” the Canberra-based gallery to buy the statue for US$5 million through forged certifications about its provenance and history.

Kapoor, who is in prison in India where he also faces charges, claimed the statue had been sold to him by the wife of a diplomat, the gallery said. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges against him.

In a statement published on its website this week, the NGA said it researched the work for a year before acquiring it and followed measures consistent with international best practice for museums.

“If the allegations regarding Mr. Kapoor are proven to be true, then our gallery, along with leading museums around the world, will have been the victim of a most audacious act of fraud,” it said.

“If proven, this fraud has involved the elaborate falsification of documents by a long-established New York art dealer who had been dealing with leading international museums for almost 40 years.”

The gallery said the Shiva was a superb example of Indian Chola-period bronze casting which originated in the Tamil Nadu region of south India and is dated to the 11th-12th century.

The statue is one of 21 items Australia’s premier art gallery purchased from Kapoor – comprising a third of all the India works on its books. The NGA said it was reconsidering its acquisition procedures in light of the case.