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Steve Slotin poses with a ventriloquist’s dummy that was being auctioned by Slotin Folk Art Auction. His wife Amy joked that it looked like Steve’s twin, prompting his bemused expression.

Auctioneer Steve Slotin says outsider art is ‘in’

Steve Slotin poses with a ventriloquist’s dummy that was being auctioned by Slotin Folk Art Auction. His wife Amy joked that it looked like Steve’s twin, prompting his “I’m not amused” expression.

Steve Slotin poses with a ventriloquist’s dummy that was being auctioned by Slotin Folk Art Auction. His wife Amy joked that it looked like Steve’s twin, prompting his bemused expression.

BUFORD, Ga. – Growing up in Georgia, Steve Slotin, who co-owns and operates Slotin Folk Art Auction with his wife, Amy, is quick to say he knew the best swimming holes and BBQ joints, but didn’t know much about the visual culture of the South. It took getting fired from CliffsNotes in his early twenties to discover a passion for folk and self-taught art. The couple spent their honeymoon traveling around the United States buying art. They launched an instantly popular annual art show, Folk Fest, in 1993, and a few years later, began their specialized auction business focusing not just on Southern folk art but self-taught art from all over the country.

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This circa 1947 Krabban hand-knitted wool carpet from Barbro Nilsson certainly qualifies as a statement piece. It brought $24,000 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2021 at Wright.

Go big AND go home: Five types of statement pieces

This circa 1947 Krabban hand-knitted wool carpet from Barbro Nilsson certainly qualifies as a statement piece. It brought $24,000 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2021 at Wright.

This circa 1947 Krabban hand-knitted wool carpet from Barbro Nilsson certainly qualifies as a statement piece. It brought $24,000 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2021 at Wright.

NEW YORK — Statement pieces make a room and speak to your personal style. They can be bold and flashy, or they can be understated, with their craftsmanship and elegance speaking volumes. These five types of objects can help you express yourself and elevate your living space.

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A 2004 screenprint of ‘Girl with Balloon’ earned $282,247 plus the buyer’s premium in March 2021 at Forum Auctions.

Collectors bank on Banksy, despite the artist’s protests

A 2004 screenprint of ‘Girl with Balloon’ earned $282,247 plus the buyer’s premium in March 2021 at Forum Auctions.

A 2004 screenprint of ‘Girl with Balloon’ by the elusive British street artist Banksy earned $282,247 plus the buyer’s premium in March 2021 at Forum Auctions.

NEW YORK — The street artist known as Banksy is both a known and unknown commodity. Yes, a commodity, as crass as that may sound. The famously anonymous street artist has created hundreds of artworks on public buildings and structures while successfully guarding his or her identity – a serious feat in a world where social media abounds and millions carry camera-equipped smart phones in their pockets. The artist lets the art speak for itself. Still, that hasn’t stopped some from trying to commodify Bansky’s art, which has brought six-figure prices, even topping the million-dollar mark at auction.

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Pictured at home in front of a Merton Simpson artwork, Matt Quinn says by focusing on people and what client’s needs are, he helps them through what can be a difficult time and maximizes their profit.

Quinn’s Sr VP Matthew Quinn says ‘People first, then things’

Pictured at home in front of a Merton Simpson artwork, Matt Quinn says by focusing on people and what client’s needs are, he helps them through what can be a difficult time and maximizes their profit.

Pictured at home in front of a Merton Simpson artwork, Matt Quinn says by focusing on the needs of his clients as people, not mere owners of ‘stuff,’ he helps them through what can be a difficult time while also maximizing their profits.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. – Matthew Quinn is quick to say he does not view himself primarily as an auctioneer. While firmly ensconced as senior vice president in his family’s auction business, Matt says when he goes on a house call, he is not as focused on “stuff” as he is on people and assessing the most expeditious way to assist them. It’s an approach that has served him well and helped transform Quinn’s Auction Galleries in Falls Church, Va., from a small auction company into a large, full-service antiques and fine art auction firm. Today, Quinn’s can sell everything in a home, get the house cleared and ready to list, and even sell it. Matt helmed the development of Quinn’s Realty & Estate Services division, which was established to help senior citizens with the downsizing process. He spoke with Auction Central News about auctions and finding joy in helping people through the process.

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Princess Diana’s enduring influence on fashion

Princess Diana wore this Emanuel ivory silk moss gown for an official visit to Bahrain in 1986. It sold for $184,032 plus the buyer’s premium in December 2018 at Kerry Taylor Auctions.

Princess Diana wore this Emanuel ivory silk moss gown for an official visit to Bahrain in 1986. It sold for $184,032 plus the buyer’s premium in December 2018 at Kerry Taylor Auctions.

NEW YORK — More than two decades after her death, the public’s enduring fascination with Princess Diana shows no signs of abating. On July 1 — what would have been her 60th birthday — a statue honoring her legacy will be unveiled in Kensington Palace’s Sunken Garden. An exhibition, Royal Style in the Making, on view from June 3 to January 2, 2022 at Kensington Palace, features a variety of royal fashions, including Diana’s iconic wedding dress.

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Antiques expert Terry Kovel explores American silver hallmarks

This Gorham Victorian sterling water pitcher, circa 1952, realized $300 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2016 at Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery.

Detail of the hallmark on a Gorham Victorian sterling water pitcher, circa 1952, which realized $300 plus the buyer’s premium in June 2016 at Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery.

NEW YORK — What Terry Kovel doesn’t know about American silver hallmarks probably isn’t worth knowing. The renowned antiques expert, appraiser and author recently chatted with Auction Central News, sharing tips for collectors on characteristics of American silver, the many hallmarks that have been recognized, and how to care for silver.

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Wilhelm Schimmel eagle carvings fly to the top of the folk art market

Boasting a 21-in wingspan, this carved spread wing eagle in original paint sold for $35,000 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2014 at Flying Pig Auctions.

Boasting a 21-in wingspan, this carved spread wing eagle in original paint sold for $35,000 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2014 at Flying Pig Auctions.

NEW YORK — Itinerant carver Wilhelm Schimmel (Germany and America, 1817-1890) was certainly a colorful character. He was known for having a rough and tumble life, punctuated by heavy drinking, bouts with the law, and possibly cheating death a few times. He emigrated to Pennsylvania from Germany around 1860 and became known as one of America’s most talented folk art carvers. His eagle wood carvings with fine detail and crosshatching are particularly coveted.

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This de Sede Non Stop sofa realized $12,000 plus the buyer’s premium in August 2018 at Material Culture.

De Sede’s ‘Non Stop’ sofa enjoys endless popularity

This de Sede Non Stop sofa realized $12,000 plus the buyer’s premium in August 2018 at Material Culture.

This de Sede Non Stop sofa realized $12,000 plus the buyer’s premium in August 2018 at Material Culture.

NEW YORK — The 1970s were not as celebrated for iconic furniture designs as the two preceding decades, when modern furniture came into its own. Still, the decade witnessed some historic contributions, and unquestionably, one of its most striking designs was de Sede’s DS-600 modular Non Stop sofa.

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A chinoiserie and faux tortoiseshell lacquered bureau-cabinet earned $36,657 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2018 at Il Ponte casa d’aste.

Chinoiserie: Western interpretations of Chinese art

A chinoiserie and faux tortoiseshell lacquered bureau-cabinet earned $36,657 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2018 at Il Ponte casa d’aste.

A chinoiserie and faux-tortoiseshell lacquered bureau-cabinet earned $36,657 plus the buyer’s premium in October 2018 at Il Ponte Casa d’Aste. Image: LiveAuctioneers and Il Ponte Casa d’Aste

NEW YORK — Traveling to faraway places for pleasure is so commonplace now that it can be hard to imagine a time when it wasn’t the case. In the 17th and 18th centuries, most people could not dream of visiting another country, but, as the West began openly trading with China, Westerners developed a keen fascination with the distant nation. European designers and tastemakers fueled this desire for all things Chinese. They created a style of decoration called chinoiserie, which derives from the French word “chinois,” for Chinese, as it was evocative of Asian art. (“Chinoiserie” is pronounced “shin-WAH-suh-ree.”)

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A lot consisting of three vintage German beer steins together brought $3,400 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020 at Robert Slawinski Auctioneers, Inc.

Collectors toast the artful history of German beer steins

This lot of three vintage German beer steins brought $3,400 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020 at Robert Slawinski Auctioneers, Inc.

A lot consisting of three vintage German beer steins together brought $3,400 plus the buyer’s premium in May 2020 at Robert Slawinski Auctioneers, Inc.

NEW YORK — German beer steins have been collected as far back as the 14th century. Newly made steins are popular souvenirs with tourists visiting German towns and cities such as Cologne, Munich, and Heidelberg. Antique and vintage ones, however, are highly prized and can fetch thousands of dollars at auction. Whether old or new, steins often feature images of the city they represent or local landmarks such as a castle or mountains and rivers. Others use scenes to tell a story.

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