Thieves take more than $1M in cash, jewels from flea market shops

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) – Six men wearing black hoodies and masks cut their way into four stores at a flea market and got away with cash, handguns and an estimated $1 million in jewelry.

Authorities say a security camera recorded the thieves Sunday as they cut through concrete walls and metal locks. They also managed to bypass security alarms.

Peter’s Gold suffered the biggest loss. Owner Chi Yim says the burglars stole everything.

The robbery occurred just before 2 a.m. Sunday. Officials say the thieves did their best to disable the security system. But video from one camera shows sparks flying as they cut their way into the padlocked door of a CD store.

___

Information from: The Florida Times-Union, http://www.jacksonville.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-21-10 1110GMT

 

Paintings seized in NY were stolen by Nazis in Poland

NEW YORK (AP) – U.S. authorities say they’ve seized two paintings in New York that were stolen from the National Museum in Warsaw, Poland, by the Nazis during World War II.

The paintings by 19th-century Polish artist Julian Falat were seized last Wednesday. Federal prosecutors also filed court papers aimed at recovering the paintings, Off to the Hunt and The Hunt.

Prosecutors say the paintings remained missing after World War II. Polish authorities alerted U.S. authorities in 2006 that both were about to be sold at auction in New York.

In a lawsuit, the U.S. government says the paintings can be seized because they constituted stolen property imported into the United States illegally.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


AP-WF-12-20-10 1944GMT


The ‘fluted pilaster group’ of which this North Carolina secretary bookcase is a fine example is discussed and illustrated in a 1981 issue of ‘Early Southern Decorative Arts.’ Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

New Year’s fireworks at Brunk Auctions’ sale Jan. 8-9

The ‘fluted pilaster group’ of which this North Carolina secretary bookcase is a fine example is discussed and illustrated in a 1981 issue of ‘Early Southern Decorative Arts.’ Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

The ‘fluted pilaster group’ of which this North Carolina secretary bookcase is a fine example is discussed and illustrated in a 1981 issue of ‘Early Southern Decorative Arts.’ Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Robert Brunk’s first sale of the New Year on Jan. 8-9 opens with three bright, loud and important sky rockets, one after the other. These important collections lead off a two-day, 882-lot sale. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

The smallest collection of the three is expected to be one of the loudest. It consists of only four items with each a clear and dramatic standout. All were consigned by the grandchild of Elizabeth Russell of Connecticut. Most came from a larger collection that originated with Samuel Wadsworth Russell, the founder of Russell & Co. That enterprise was the largest trading house in China from 1842 until its close in 1891. With that pedigree, these Asian antiques are sure to brighten the skies over Asheville.

Topping the Russell collection is View of the Bund at Shanghai (est. $60,000-$90,000), a large unsigned oil on canvas circa 1855. It was purchased in Hong Kong and transported to the United States. The consignor bought the painting, attributed to Chow Kwa (Chinese, active 1850-1885), in 1993 at Sotheby’s New York. The painting is a finely detailed and accurate depiction of ships in the harbor including an American steamer. In the background are the Customs House, the British Consulate and the Augustine Heard & Co. building.

The earliest items in the Russell collection are two 17th-century Kano School six-panel screens (est. $5,000-$10,000). The paper screens are Japanese and depict Chinese court scenes with officials, horses and attendants. Each screen has a custom-made cedar-lined transport case.

Then there are the two circa 1900 silk and metal thread carpets from the Russell collection. Both are Imperial rugs in excellent condition. One depicts Imperial dragons in the central medallion and four corners (est. $12,000-$18,000); the other (est. $15,000-$20,000) is elaborately decorated with cranes, sea serpents, waves and clouds surrounded by a Greek key border.

The largest collection comes from Philip and Charlotte Hanes of Winston-Salem, N.C. All 41 lots were consigned from the Hanes’ residence, Middleton House, a late Federal period home that was moved from Clarks Hill, S.C., in 1930. The Hanes gifted the home to Wake Forest University in 1991. Some Middleton lots were purchased by Mr. Hanes on trips to London; others were family gifts.

Two furniture items illustrate the quality and significance of the Hanes’ collection: eight Charleston Federal dining chairs and a Catawba River Valley secretary bookcase.

“The Charleston chairs are indeed extraordinarily rare,” said auctioneer and senior specialist Andrew Brunk. “I know of only one other intact set in the collections of Bayou Bend at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.” The set – six side chairs and two armchairs – was illustrated in the Raushenberg and Bivins classic, The Furniture of Charleston, 1680-1820. In mahogany with finely carved urn-formed central slats and fine modern horsehair upholstery, they carry the sale’s second highest estimate: $40,000-$60,000.

The largest Hanes lot at 115 inches tall is a cherry and poplar secretary bookcase from around the turn of the 19th century (est. $25,000-$35,000). The elaborate and flourishing inlays in its three drawers, its delicate sectioned glazed door and fluted pilasters, command attention from across the gallery. At its top is a tall original inlaid finial; on bottom are its original French feet.

Philip Hanes was CEO of Hanes Dye and Finishing from 1964 to his retirement in 1976. He and his wife are noted for their leadership and generous support of the arts in Winston-Salem.

The third bright light is the Bridge to Heaven jade collection accumulated by the late Pauline McCord Bishop in the late 1960s. The collection focuses on carvings extending from China’s Neolithic era through the Qing period. Included in the 29-lot collection are figures of buffalo, chimera, goats, deer, dogs, ducks and rabbits as well as various mythical beasts. Brunk devoted an entire page in the catalog and the catalog cover to a hu-form lidded vase (est. $15,000-$30,000). The flattened baluster form vase is in translucent “lychee white” with ducks, lotuses and flowering plants. Its walls are extremely thin with perforations on every surface except its pedestal base, handle rings and handle ends.

Four other lots deserve special attention:

  • Possibly the earliest item in the sale is an attic red-figure krater from 450-440 B.C. attributed to the Painter of Munich 2335 (est. $12,000-$18,000). Each side has three figures: a woman between two bearded male figures on one side and three young men on the other. A letter from an official at the Metropolitan Museum of Art verifies the attribution.
  • Dark Beauty (est. $10,000-$15,000), a signed and dated (1999) watercolor by Stephen Scott Young (Florida, South Carolina, b. 1957) depicts a young African-American woman looking directly at the viewer over a white board fence.
  • A signed and dated (1854) stoneware jar by John Siegler of South Carolina’s famed Edgefield District is estimated to bring $3,000 to $6,000. The jar was crafted one year after Siegler established his pottery on Shaw’s Creek.
  • A Harvey Littleton glass crown sculpture (est. $10,000-$20,000) is one of the few contemporary pieces from the Hanes collection. Created in 1984, the 12-part construction reflects pinks, yellows, blues and purples. Harvey Littleton was awarded the North Carolina Living Treasure award in 1993.

For more information, please call 828-254-6846 or visit www.brunkauctions.com.

 

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


In ink, color and gold leaf on paper, each of the 17th-century Kano School screens measures 70 inches x 150 inches. Both were collected by Elizabeth Russell in the early 1900s. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

In ink, color and gold leaf on paper, each of the 17th-century Kano School screens measures 70 inches x 150 inches. Both were collected by Elizabeth Russell in the early 1900s. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

This 8 1/2-inch attic red-figure column krater was sold at Sotheby’s New York in 1986. Dating from 450-440 B.C., it is one of the oldest items in the sale. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

This 8 1/2-inch attic red-figure column krater was sold at Sotheby’s New York in 1986. Dating from 450-440 B.C., it is one of the oldest items in the sale. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

The Charleston side chairs are 37 1/2 inches x  21 1/2 inches x 21 inches. The armchairs are 2 inches wider. In excellent condition, the set of eight from the Hanes collection is expected to bring $40,000-$60,000. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

The Charleston side chairs are 37 1/2 inches x 21 1/2 inches x 21 inches. The armchairs are 2 inches wider. In excellent condition, the set of eight from the Hanes collection is expected to bring $40,000-$60,000. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

The height of this Harvey Littleton glass crown sculpture varies from 6 1/4 inches to 21 1/2 inches and is estimated at $10,000-$20,000. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

The height of this Harvey Littleton glass crown sculpture varies from 6 1/4 inches to 21 1/2 inches and is estimated at $10,000-$20,000. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

Note the reticulated Chinese Export frame on this finely detailed ‘View of the Bund at Shanghai’ attributed to Chow Kwa (Chinese, active 1850-1885). The oil on canvas carries the sale’s top estimate, $60,000-$90,000. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

Note the reticulated Chinese Export frame on this finely detailed ‘View of the Bund at Shanghai’ attributed to Chow Kwa (Chinese, active 1850-1885). The oil on canvas carries the sale’s top estimate, $60,000-$90,000. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

Signed ‘Raphael Coronel’ lower left and inscribed ‘De Paseo No. 456,’ this large oil painting, 48 inches by 39 1/2 inches, sold for $50,400. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Latin American art brings top dollar at Morton Kuehnert

Signed ‘Raphael Coronel’ lower left and inscribed ‘De Paseo No. 456,’ this large oil painting, 48 inches by 39 1/2 inches, sold for $50,400. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Signed ‘Raphael Coronel’ lower left and inscribed ‘De Paseo No. 456,’ this large oil painting, 48 inches by 39 1/2 inches, sold for $50,400. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

HOUSTON – One hundred twenty lots of Latin American art and antiques were on the block recently at Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers. Lot 6, Rafael Coronel’s De Paseo oil on canvas, was the frontrunner at the Dec. 12 auction, with a winning bid of $50,400.

The majority of the lots were the property of a private collection in South Texas. All prices listed here include the buyer’s premium.

“Morton Kuehnert is pleased with the results from our first serious Latin American art auction,” said Lindsay Davis, the auction house’s Fine Art Specialist. “The interest in the early religious art, as well as pieces from strong 20th-century artists, helps us chart a path for our Latin American art auctions scheduled for May and November 2011,” she added.

Morton Kuehnert and partner Morton Subastas in Mexico City are combining resources for the enrichment of Latin American art and artists, as Houston continues to garner national attention with the Museum of Fine Arts/Houston emphasis in that area.

Bidders’ choices included 18th- and 19th-century religious paintings in the style of the Mexican School, such as Lot 21, the Virgin of Guadalupe oil on canvas, selling for $7,200, and Lot 23, the Virgin of Guadalupe oil on burlap, selling for $3,300. Lot 28, Nino Muerto, an oil on canvas which sold for $9,000, was also of the Mexican School.

Elena Climent’s 2006 Shelf with St. Anthony and His Visions, Lot 1, sold for $6,600. Lot 38, an untitled 1948 Diego Rivera pastel and ink on paper of a young boy, sold for $36,000.

Lot 2, C. Anton Goering’s 1880 Venezuelan Scene watercolor on heavy paper sold for $7,800 and Lot 4, Guillermo Gomez’ Mayorga’s circa 1930s untitled oil on canvas of a view through a Mexico City gateway, sold for $10,800.

Lot 11, the oil on canvas of the Enthroned Madonna and Child, also from the Mexican School of religious paintings, sold for $4,800.

Lot 20, a circa 17th-18th-century religious oil on panel portrait from the Spanish Colonial School depicting Saint Nicolas de Tolentino, sold for $4,200. Lot 22, an 18th-century oil on canvas from the Peruvian School/Lima Academy titled Santa Rosa de Lima sold for $4,800.

Lot 80, a mid-century landscape of mixed media on paper entitled Patzcuro, Michoan Coast, by Alfredo Zalce, 1965, sold for $3,600. Lot 89, A. Orellana’s 1890 Pueblan Family oil painting on board sold for $3,600 as well.

Three oils on canvas by 20th-century Mexican artist Alberto Ruiz Vela were sold, including Lot 97, a cowboy herding scene, at $1,320; Lot 98, a town center scene, sold at $1,140; and Lot 99, a town scene, sold at $1,320. Lot 100, an oil on canvas by Pablo Almela, another 20th-century Mexican artist, entitled Guanajuaro, 1947, sold for $1,200.

Two oils on board by artist Sergio Bustamante sold, (Mexican, b. 1942) including Lot 65, an untitled painting Lions on a Rainbow, at $660, and Lot 66 of Lions in a Tree at $1,140.

Two Jaimes Murillo (Mexican, b. 1940) paintings sold, including Lot 69, an oil and sand on masonite entitled El Peluquero, 1983, selling at $360 and Lot 105 oil on canvas of an African Fertility Female, 1997, selling for $1,800.

Lot 53, a 19th-century hand-painted marriage cupboard, fetched $18,000 and Lot 16, a Bolivian silver censer, sold for $1,440.

Anyone interested in consigning Latin American art and antiques for Morton Kuehnert’s May 2011 auction may e-mail photos and descriptions to Lindsay Davis at ldavis@mortonkuehnert.com.

For information on Morton Kuehnert, please visit our website at www.mortonkuehnert.com or our Facebook page.

To receive announcements on Latin American consignments and auctions, please send your contact information to LatinArt@mortonkuehnert.com.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


C. Anton Goering (German, 1836-1905) Venezuelan scene, 1880, watercolor on heavy paper, signed and dated ‘A. Goering 1880,’ 13 1/2 x 23 inches, $10,800. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

C. Anton Goering (German, 1836-1905) Venezuelan scene, 1880, watercolor on heavy paper, signed and dated ‘A. Goering 1880,’ 13 1/2 x 23 inches, $10,800. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Mexican School, 18th century, ‘The Enthroned Madonna and Child,’ oil on canvas 49 1/2 x 37 1/2 inches, provenance: Christie's The House Sale, Oct. 1-3, 2007, lot 904, New York, $4,800. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Mexican School, 18th century, ‘The Enthroned Madonna and Child,’ oil on canvas 49 1/2 x 37 1/2 inches, provenance: Christie’s The House Sale, Oct. 1-3, 2007, lot 904, New York, $4,800. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

A. Orellana (Mexican School, 19th century) Pueblan Family, 1890, oil on board, signed ‘A. Orellana 1890’ lower left, 12 x 8 inches, $3,600. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

A. Orellana (Mexican School, 19th century) Pueblan Family, 1890, oil on board, signed ‘A. Orellana 1890’ lower left, 12 x 8 inches, $3,600. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Pair of carved early Continental alabaster and marble statues of Cleopatra and Judith, $132,250. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Continental statues of Cleopatra and Judith bring $132,250 at Fontaine’s

Pair of carved early Continental alabaster and marble statues of Cleopatra and Judith, $132,250. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Pair of carved early Continental alabaster and marble statues of Cleopatra and Judith, $132,250. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

PITTSFIELD, Mass. – A pair of carved, early Continental alabaster and marble statues of Cleopatra and Judith, each standing 23 inches tall and having exceptional detail, sold for $132,250 at a cataloged antique auction held Nov. 13 by Fontaine’s Auction Gallery. The statues were the top earner of the more than 500 lots sold. Overall, the sale grossed about $1.4 million.

Around 300 people packed the Fontaine’s Auction Gallery showroom, located at 1485 W. Housatonic St., for the standing room only event. In addition, there were about 800 Internet bidders who participated online via LiveAuctioneers.com and the Fontaine’s website, www.fontainesauction.net. Phone and absentee bidding was also brisk all day long.

“It’s kind of refreshing that the market seems to be picking up,” said John Fontaine of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery, acknowledging that the antique business in general has ebbed and flowed over the last couple of years, ever since the financial crisis wreaked havoc on the economy. “Activity in all areas of our auction business has increased. People are bidding more freely and enthusiastically.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

The sale’s top lot may have been statuary artwork, but vintage lamps and antique clocks dominated the list of top earners. A Tiffany 10-light Tulip lamp with pulled feather tulip shades on a signed Tiffany base, 21 inches tall, went for $40,250, while an E. Howard #71 regulator wall clock from the 1880s, 70 inches tall, black walnut with ebony trim case, garnered $25,875.

Keeping with lamps, a 16-inch Tiffany Studios Poinsettia shade with red flowers with blue, gold and green centers fetched $25,875; an 18-inch Handel Riverbed scenic lamp (#6752), artist signed “HB” (Henry Bedigie), and in excellent condition soared to $24,150; and a 16-inch signed Tiffany Studios Pomegranate table lamp with dichroic and mottled shade rose to $12,650.

Rounding out the category, a Handel Floral & Butterfly lamp (#6688), with an 18-inch reverse-painted shade showing apple blossoms and butterflies brought $11,500; an Anton Chotka Austrian cold-painted bronze lamp titled “The Jewelry Merchant,” 15 1/2 inches tall, hit $9,775; and a Duffner & Kimberly leaded table lamp with 21-inch fern pattern shade commanded $8,050.

A James Condliff astronomical clock with 12-inch silvered dial, inscribed on the movement dust cover (“Ino B. McFadden A.D. 1832”) coasted to $19,550 to a bidder from England, where the clock was made; a circa 1905 Waltham #14 ball regulator with quartered oak case, 74 inches tall, rose to $14,950; and a three-piece French figural gilt bronze owl clock set with 3-branch candelabra brought $10,350.

Other clocks that did well included an Elliott grandfather clock with great proportions and detailed carvings, and signed nine-tube movement ($10,350); a J.L. Ruetter perpetual Atmos desk clock featuring a nice chrome base with beveled glass ($6,325); and a Guilmet French industrial balance beam engine clock with painted silver and gilt brass base ($4,600).

Fine art included an oil on canvas portrait of a harlequin (jester) by Emilio Pettoruti (Argentine, 1892-1971), 22 inches by 28 inches ($8,625); a hand-painted 10-inch Royal Vienna 10-inch portrait plate after Bluthen, artist signed and in excellent condition ($3,737); and a pair of 19th- century carved marble angels, both shown kneeling and with long flowing robes ($7,475).

Dazzling pieces of estate jewelry were also offered. A lady’s 14K white gold platinum and diamond pendant with a main round brilliant cut diamond weighing 1.87 carats with VS-1 clarity garnered $13,800; and a lady’s 14K yellow gold handmade custom ring containing 16 square cut genuine rubies totaling 2.40 carats, with 17 brilliant round cut diamonds, hit $4,025.

Sterling silver pieces really got paddles wagging. Star lots included a figural repousse tankard by Emile Puiforcat of Paris, with a scene showing maidens dancing and playing music in a vineyard, 102.5 troy ounces ($6,612); and a circa 1910 Russian silver figural rhinoceros with diamond eyes by Julius Rappaport, a noted Faberge workmaster, weighing 6.56 ounces ($4,312).

Decorative accessories featured an exceptional American rosewood rococo chevelle dressing mirror with grape carved crest and elaborate legs with carved stretcher ($5,750); a Raoul Larche gilded bronze inkwell depicting a figural nude woman on a rock ($5,750); and a nice triform Daum Nancy cameo cut Dragonfly tray with green and yellow water lilies ($4,140).

Rounding out the day’s top lots: a fully restored 1894 popcorn and peanut wagon made by C. Cretors & Co. (Chicago) changed hands for $14,950; a matching set of 12 chairs from the Renaissance Revival period, including two armchairs, breezed to $7,762; and a set of six figural Stag Russian silver shot glasses, each one 3 inches high and marked “KL,” fetched $4,312.

For more information, or to consign an item, estate or collection, call 413- 448-8922 and ask to speak to John Fontaine. Or, you may e-mail him at info@fontaineauction.com. For more info, log on to www.fontainesauction.net.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Tiffany 10-light Tulip lamp with pulled feather tulip shades on a signed Tiffany base, $40,250. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Tiffany 10-light Tulip lamp with pulled feather tulip shades on a signed Tiffany base, $40,250. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

E. Howard #71 regulator wall clock, circa 1880s, 70 inches tall, black walnut case, $25,875. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

E. Howard #71 regulator wall clock, circa 1880s, 70 inches tall, black walnut case, $25,875. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Oil on canvas portrait of a harlequin (jester) by Argentine painter Emilio Pettoruti, $8,625. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Oil on canvas portrait of a harlequin (jester) by Argentine painter Emilio Pettoruti, $8,625. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Lady's 14kt white gold platinum and diamond pendant, diamond weighing 1.87 carats, $13,800. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Lady’s 14kt white gold platinum and diamond pendant, diamond weighing 1.87 carats, $13,800. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Fully restored 1894 popcorn and peanut wagon made by C. Cretors & Co. of Chicago, $14,950. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Fully restored 1894 popcorn and peanut wagon made by C. Cretors & Co. of Chicago, $14,950. Image courtesy of Fontaine’s Auction Gallery.

Spanish police recover Picasso, Botero art stolen from warehouse

MADRID (AP) – Spanish police say they have recovered artworks including pieces by Picasso, Colombian artist Fernando Botero and Spanish sculptor Eduardo Chillida that were stolen from a Madrid warehouse.

Specialized Crimes unit chief Dionisio Martin said Monday the art was found in a stolen truck in an industrial area on Madrid’s southern outskirts.

The pieces, recovered Saturday, had a total value of some euro5 million ($6.5 million), Martin said.

He said 35 pieces were stolen and one remains missing. No arrests have been made so far.

Martin said the thieves had tried to sell one of Chillida’s metal sculptures to a scrap dealer.

The works were stolen on Nov. 27 by thieves who broke into the warehouse and stole a vehicle containing them.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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Chippendale walnut bureau, Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, $48,875. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Virginia Chippendale bureau tops $48,000 at Jeffrey S. Evans auction

Chippendale walnut bureau, Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, $48,875. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Chippendale walnut bureau, Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, $48,875. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

MOUNT CRAWFORD, Va. – On Saturday, Nov. 13, Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates conducted its 20th annual Fall Americana & Fine Antiques Cataloged Auction. The 724-lot sale began at 9:30 a.m. Eastern and concluded in just over seven hours.

For the past decade the firm’s fall auction has had a special focus on material from Virginia and other Southern states, and this auction included one of the more impressive regional groupings that Jeffrey Evans and his team has assembled in recent years. Featured consignments to the auction included material from the estate of longtime Shenandoah Valley collector Dr. Jean Wine of Harrisonburg, Va.; possessions of a Loudoun Co., Va., family comprising items descended from renowned 19th-century thoroughbred race horse owner and breeder James Robert Keene (1838-1913); items deaccessioned by a Virginia institution; heirlooms descended in an early Pendleton County, (W.)Va. family; along with material from prominent Virginia, Maryland and Ohio private collections.

The broad range of fresh material offered resulted in a near capacity crowd throughout most of the day. Total in-house bidders numbered 250, another 160 absentee and phone bidders registered through the firm’s website, and more than 450 bidders participated through LiveAuctioneers, generating an additional 6,700-plus bids. Evans and his staff processed nearly 9,000 bids for the single-day auction.

The sale’s most coveted lot was an important Shenandoah Valley of Virginia Chippendale walnut three-over-three-drawer bureau attributed to the circle of Gideon Morgan (1751-1830) of Staunton, Va. The circa 1790 diminutive bureau – today commonly referred to as a chest of drawers – stood only 39 inches high x 38 inches wide x 20 1/2 inches deep. It was in virtually untouched original condition with its only replaced elements being the brasses on the lower three drawers. The bureau also retained an historical and possibly original surface, an extremely rare feature that added immensely to its remarkable state of preservation.

The Shenandoah Valley bureau had been purchased at an on-site estate auction in Rockbridge Co., Va., in 1999 by an agent for collectors John and Lil Palmer of Purcellville, Va., and had resided in one of the Palmers’ bedrooms until they consigned it with Evans. Before the auction Evans commented that not since his firm sold the now famous Johannes Spitler decorated cupboard in 2004 had he entertained so many requests for early preview of a specific lot.

“Everyone that inspected the bureau absolutely loved it,” Evans remarked.

The bidding quickly surpassed the $10,000-$15,000 estimate with numerous in-house bidders participating. At the $30,000 level the bidding was between an advanced Virginia collector and a representative of a prominent Virginia museum, with the collector finally prevailing at $48,875. All prices quoted here include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

After the auction Evans said that he had been trying to persuade the Palmers to let him sell the bureau since they acquired it in 1999, relating that “John, who is an advanced collector of Virginia pie safes, always said if it would bring enough to buy a great safe or two he would let it go, and well you can guess the rest of the story.” Evans added, “The bureau’s outstanding condition, the rock-solid attribution that we were able to build, and the fact that it was sold unreserved, all greatly contributed to the strong interest and final price the bureau achieved.”

Other Virginia furniture that drew abundant interest and aggressive bidding included a rare signed Presley Cordell (1779-1849), Leesburg, Va., walnut tall-case clock from the collection of Leah and the late Bill Pollard of Purcellville, Va. The stately circa 1800 timepiece, which stood 103 inches high, was in outstanding running condition and sold to a Virginia phone bidder for $25,300. A fine circa 1840 Pendleton Co., (W.)Va. cherry child’s chest of drawers featured carved and turned ornaments and was signed by cabinetmaker Adam Waggoner (1807-1885) of Pendleton County, Va. This finely constructed diminutive chest measured only 24 inches high and 18 inches wide and had survived in near pristine original condition. It quickly surpassed its $3,000-$5,000 estimate selling for $10,350. Another Virginia piece acquired by an out-of-state buyer was an exceptional walnut diminutive sideboard pie safe set with 10 finely punched tulip tins and featuring a bold cutout gallery. This little jewel was only 38 inches high x 55 1/2 inches wide and retained its original black surface and remnants of blue paint on the tins. It was made around 1860, probably in Greene or Madison counties, and sold for $8,625 to an Internet bidder from Missouri.

A large selection of Virginia country accessories crossed the block including two exceptional Valley of Virginia painted white oak splint baskets from the Pulaski/Craig/Giles Co. area. The first (lot 82) was a finely woven diminutive example retaining its original dry red wash and measuring only 3 inches high at the rim. The second larger example (lot 83) stood 6 1/2 inches high at the rim and displayed an original dry, blue painted exterior and green painted interior. Each dated to the late 19th or early 20th century and sold for $3,737.50 against an $800-$1,200 estimate.

The fine art section of the auction was also led by a Virginia-related work. A well-documented Charles Balthazar Julien Fevret de Saint-Memin (French/American, 1770-1852) chalk on paper portrait of Dr. Amos Newhall (1773-1835) of Essex County, Va., drew much interest. The likeness had been drawn in Richmond around 1807 or 1808 and was still housed in its original 26-inch x 19 1/2-inch gilt and gesso frame with eglomise painted glass. It was first published by Ellen G. Miles in her 1942 seminal catalogue raisonne, Saint-Memin and the Classical Profile Portrait in America, p. 361, and later on page 821 of the June 1966 issue of the periodical, Antiques. The abundance of historical information that Evans compiled for the portrait, including provenance dating back to the 1920s, undoubtedly contributed to the work tripling its low estimate to sell to a Maryland phone bidder for $14,950 (lot 281).

A number of Virginia prints and maps were highlighted by a fine hand-tinted lithograph image of Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County after Edward Beyer (1820-1865). Taken from Beyer’s renowned Album of Virginia published in 1857, the example offered by Evans was in excellent condition and displayed strong colors. A determined phone bidder and an Internet bidder battled until it sold at $6,325 (lot 259), establishing a record price for a Beyer print.

The auction also included a highly important group of silver horse racing and polo trophies won by and descended from James Robert Keene (1838-1913), a renowned 19th-century thoroughbred owner, breeder, and winner of six Belmont Stakes. The top lot of the group was a Whiting Manufacturing Co. two-handle trophy awarded in 1883 to Spendthrift, one of Keene’s Belmont Stakes winners. The handsome 11-inch-high prize weighed in at nearly 60 troy ounces and sold for $10,350 (lot 520) to an elated in-house bidder.

A collection of antique firearms assembled by Dr. Joseph E. Gardner of Harrisonburg, Va., included a Second Model Virginia Manufactory flintlock pistol marked “RICHMOND / 1813” and “VIRGINIA” on the lock plate. Despite a replaced frizzen and part of the hammer, the relic realized $6,900 (lot 483).

Other auction material of note included a complete set of 13 Royal Doulton “Soldiers of the Revolution” figures issued in 1976 and limited to only 350 sets (lot 246, $10,925); a group of Shenandoah Valley domestic earthenware, much of which had been exhibited at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Hagerstown, Md., including five polychrome-glazed pitchers ranging from 6 inches to 10 inches high (lots 11-15, $1,380 to $2,300); a collection of American Rockingham-glazed pottery highlighted by a signed Bennington Toby-form 4 1/4 inches high snuff jar in near mint condition (lot 590, $1,725); and a labeled “Ideal Bookcase Unit” by Globe-Wernieke Co., Grade 598, mahogany three-stack barrister bookcase with a lower drawer and original beveled glass (lot 447, $2,875).

Reaction to the auction from firm-president and auctioneer Jeffrey Evans was upbeat. “While there are still a tremendous number of fabulous bargains to be found in the current antiques market, especially in the furniture sector, we are encouraged by the large increase in the number of bidders participating in our auctions. One of the big keys to our success is that we are able to secure desirable, fresh material for each auction, 99 percent of which is unreserved, and present it with very attractive presale estimates that reflect the current market trends.” Evans added, “We choose not to fill our sales with well-traveled shop-worn merchandise protected by unrealistic reserves.”

Asked to expound on the current state of the American antiques trade, Evans offered, “It remains a buyer’s market – what something sold for five years ago or a decade-old appraisal value are no longer relevant in today’s economy. Well-cataloged, regional material in good condition continues to sell for solid prices when it carries a conservative estimate, while generic Americana is drawing very little interest at present. Today’s collectors seem to focus more on objects that display social or historical importance within a specific region or culture. The all-embracing antiquarians of years past who collected primarily by form and function are no longer driving the market. Because of this, the majority of general-line material is now selling at less than secondhand store prices. This presents a great opportunity for someone to furnish a home with nice antique furniture for pennies on the dollar compared to what it would have cost five or ten years ago.”

Contact the auction house or check the firm’s website at www.jeffreysevans.com for a detailed schedule of 2011 auctions, educational events and additional information. Updates are also posted on the firm’s Facebook page. Call 540-434-3939 for additional information or e-mail info@jeffreysevans.com.

 

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Presley Cordell, Leesburg, Va., walnut tall-case clock, $25,300. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Presley Cordell, Leesburg, Va., walnut tall-case clock, $25,300. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Child’s cherry chest of drawers, Pendleton County, (W.)Va., $10,350. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Child’s cherry chest of drawers, Pendleton County, (W.)Va., $10,350. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Saint-Memin portrait of Dr. Amos Newhall, Essex Co., Va., chalk on paper, $14,950. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Saint-Memin portrait of Dr. Amos Newhall, Essex Co., Va., chalk on paper, $14,950. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Whiting sterling silver thoroughbred trophy, 1883, $10,350. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Whiting sterling silver thoroughbred trophy, 1883, $10,350. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Earthenware 7-inch pitcher, polychrome-glaze, Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, $2,300. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Earthenware 7-inch pitcher, polychrome-glaze, Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, $2,300. Image courtesy of Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Inc.

Official Royal Wedding china produced to commemorate the union of Prince William and Catherine Middleton. Image courtesy of The Royal Collection Shop.

Prince William approves official Royal Wedding memorabilia

Official Royal Wedding china produced to commemorate the union of Prince William and Catherine Middleton. Image courtesy of The Royal Collection Shop.

Official Royal Wedding china produced to commemorate the union of Prince William and Catherine Middleton. Image courtesy of The Royal Collection Shop.

LONDON (AP and ACNI) – Britain’s royal wedding is still four months away, but the first official memorabilia went on sale yesterday –  a range of wedding china personally approved by the couple.

Prince William’s office said the items had been commissioned by the palace department responsible for the royal family’s art collection and made in Stoke-on-Trent in central England, a traditional center for British ceramics.

The three souvenirs – a tankard, plate and pill box – each feature the couple’s entwined initials, the prince’s coronet emblem and the date of the wedding: April 29, 2011.

On sale at royal palaces and a website, profits from the collectibles will be donated to the charity which curates the royal family’s artworks, known as the Royal Collection.

“The Royal Collection has been working on the design since around the time of the engagement – it’s a very fast moving process,” William’s office said in a statement.

His office said that the prince and his future bride had both approved the wedding merchandise. However, the officially sanctioned goods, which do not include images of William and fiancee Catherine “Kate” Middleton, have met with a rather lukewarm response from the British media.

Stephen Bayley, cultural and design critic for The Telegraph, went so far as to describe the conservatively themed china with muted foliage, ribbons and doves as “polite and dull…lazy and insipid.”

He offers one positive note, though: “The decoration thankfully disdains cloying sentimental portraits and hints at the pleasantries of The Festival of Britain in the Fifties – but it fails to be anything more exciting than pallid.”

The future King and Queen Consort made their first joint public appearance on Saturday since announcing their engagement. The couple attended a cancer charity fundraising event in eastern England.

The Royal Wedding will take place at Westminster Abbey on April 29, 2011.

Auction Central News International contributed to this report.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press and Auction Central News International. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-20-10 0004GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


An alternative to the officially commissioned goods, the Royal Wedding round tray by Royal Worcester has a retail price $26.49. Image courtesy of UK Gift Company.

An alternative to the officially commissioned goods, the Royal Wedding round tray by Royal Worcester has a retail price $26.49. Image courtesy of UK Gift Company.

Although not officially commissioned, the Royal Engagement tankard by Aynsley features images of the betrothed couple and retails at $39.76. Image courtesy of UK Gift Company.

Although not officially commissioned, the Royal Engagement tankard by Aynsley features images of the betrothed couple and retails at $39.76. Image courtesy of UK Gift Company.

Halcyon Days produced their own line of "unofficial" Royal Wedding goods, including this Royal Engagement box, limited edition of 250, with a retail price $232.35. Image courtesy of UK Gift Company.

Halcyon Days produced their own line of "unofficial" Royal Wedding goods, including this Royal Engagement box, limited edition of 250, with a retail price $232.35. Image courtesy of UK Gift Company.

Saguaro cacti dot the landscape around Tucson. Copyrighted photo by Jeff Dean, taken Jan. 22, 2008.

Tucson Old Pueblo gets new map

Saguaro cacti dot the landscape around Tucson. Copyrighted photo by Jeff Dean, taken Jan. 22, 2008.

Saguaro cacti dot the landscape around Tucson. Copyrighted photo by Jeff Dean, taken Jan. 22, 2008.

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) – A grassroots effort is developing a new map and guide of historic neighborhoods and sites in Tucson’s Old Pueblo.

A committee made up of neighbors and organizations is developing the free map and guide with information about more than two dozen historic neighborhoods, sites and landmarks in Tucson.

The Arizona Daily Star reports it will be printed in the spring and distributed in such places as resorts, shops, museums and galleries.

Alan Myklebust of the Blenman-Elm Neighborhood Association says the committee came together last spring after discovering a similar map and guide from the Phoenix area.

Each association is writing a description about its historic structures, home styles, famous people and events.

A core committee led by members of the Tucson Historic Preservation Office will ensure the information’s accuracy.

___

Information from: Arizona Daily Star, http://www.azstarnet.com.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-19-10 2130GMT

Prince Harry at the Garter Procession, June 16, 2008. Image by Nick Warner of Windsor, England. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Prince Harry visits Holocaust Memorial

Prince Harry at the Garter Procession, June 16, 2008. Image by Nick Warner of Windsor, England. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Prince Harry at the Garter Procession, June 16, 2008. Image by Nick Warner of Windsor, England. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

BERLIN (AP) – Britain’s Prince Harry paid tribute Sunday to the people killed trying to escape communist East Germany across the Berlin Wall, and also made a private visit to the German capital’s Holocaust memorial.

The 26-year-old prince laid a wreath at a memorial in the German capital’s Bernauer Strasse, which contains one of the few remaining sections of the Berlin Wall.

It was accompanied by a handwritten message that read: “For all those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in pursuit of freedom. Harry.”

Researchers estimate that 136 people were killed while trying to cross the Berlin Wall between its building in 1961 and 1989, when East Germany opened its border.

Harry also spent more than an hour at the memorial to the Holocaust’s 6 million Jewish victims _ a field of 2,700 gray slabs, situated close to the capital’s signature Brandenburg Gate, which opened to the public in 2005.

Harry toured the museum under the memorial, meeting staff and a Holocaust survivor, a spokesman for the prince said. He wanted to keep the visit private “given the poignancy of the place,” he added.

The prince was in Berlin for a television fundraising gala Saturday night at which he was honored for his charity work.

On Sunday, he also visited the Brandenburg Gate, a symbol of Germany’s Cold War division and its reunification.

The prince, the third in line to the British throne, has shed a party-loving, bad-boy image over recent years.

In January 2005, Harry apologized after being pictured in a newspaper at a costume party dressed as a Nazi, complete with a swastika armband.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-19-10 1811GMT