Tornado devastation in Tuscaloosa, Ala., along 15th Street, near the intersection of McFarland Boulevard. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Amid rubble, tornado survivors find family keepsakes

Tornado devastation in Tuscaloosa, Ala., along 15th Street, near the intersection of McFarland Boulevard. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Tornado devastation in Tuscaloosa, Ala., along 15th Street, near the intersection of McFarland Boulevard. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) – When Lois Sayer’s three daughters returned to their tornado-wrecked childhood home, they mourned the loss of their 88-year-old mother and discovered a few of the irreplaceable keepsakes that will tell the story of their parents’ lives.

Across the twister-ravaged South, residents and family members continued picking through the ruins, collecting whatever family treasure or piece of their cherished past they could.

Volunteers used sledgehammers to knock down walls and break concrete so Sayer’s daughters could retrieve their father’s World War II uniform, complete with his Bronze Star. They found their mother’s prized necklace, the one with a shell casing on it that reminded her of the factory where she worked during the war. It was that job that helped their parents build an $8,000 house, which was demolished in the epic Tuscaloosa storm on April 27.

“That was a time when ladies first went into the workforce. She was really, really proud to have been a part of the war effort,” said Sayer’s daughter, Cindy Meyers.

Sayer, whose husband Maurice died four years ago, was killed in the house she had lived in for 62 years.

“We’re coping, but it’s kind of a state of shock,” Meyers said. “It’s so surreal. We would love to wake up from this really horrific dream.”

Searching through the rubble for sentimental items can help the healing process, said Jerry Rosenberg, a psychology professor at the University of Alabama.

“The more you can get the more you have a continuity of what was there before the trauma,” Rosenberg said. “And that’s immensely important for the life you’re going to rebuild.”

Shortly before the tornado struck, Meyers called her mother and told her to get in the hallway. Her mother responded: “I got my helmet,” referring to the bicycle helmet she wore in such storms.

The five-bedroom, three-bath house was sturdy, and had survived many storms. But this was the worst storm since the Great Depression, leaving at least 328 people dead – 236 in Alabama alone.

Another one of Sayer’s daughters, Brenda Dupre, remembered her parents laying the concrete blocks during the home’s construction when she was 5-years-old, her dad telling her to get out of the way.

“I always thought that house was the prettiest house on the street,” Dupre said. “It’s always been home, now we have no home. It’s devastating.”

But all was not lost.

The sisters found their grandmother’s bible, their mother’s diamond engagement ring and a scrapbook. They discovered baby photos, her father’s antique coin collection, the paintings her mother did and the quilts and afghans she sewed.

“We always wore dresses she made,” said Dupre of Mobile, Ala. “She was a good homemaker.”

As they found items, the sisters would reflect, hug and put the ones they wanted to save in a pile.

In Holt, an area just outside Tuscaloosa, residents and relatives of the dead streamed back to the neighborhood to see what they could salvage.

Some people weren’t lucky. Kevin Rice couldn’t find anything he owned in the area where his mobile home once was. He’s staying at a motel as long as he can afford it, and hasn’t even started asking for help, from FEMA or any government agency.

“It’s just a hurting feeling,” he said. “I don’t know what to say or how to act.”

Charles Leonard found some family pictures and records that belonged to his late father when he picked through what’s left of his 68-year-old mother’s home. But he wondered if looters absconded with other valuables before residents were allowed to return.

“The sheriff’s department did the best they could, but there were so many” looters, Leonard said.

___

Associated Press writer Michael Kunzelman in Holt contributed to this story.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-04-11 1148GMT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Tornado devastation in Tuscaloosa, Ala., along 15th Street, near the intersection of McFarland Boulevard. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Tornado devastation in Tuscaloosa, Ala., along 15th Street, near the intersection of McFarland Boulevard. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Original Hero road-going ‘GEN 11’ car from the classic 1968 film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, est. $1,000,000-$2,000,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Chitty Chitty film car leads May 14-15 Profiles in History sale

Original Hero road-going ‘GEN 11’ car from the classic 1968 film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, est. $1,000,000-$2,000,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Original Hero road-going ‘GEN 11’ car from the classic 1968 film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, est. $1,000,000-$2,000,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

LOS ANGELES – Joe Maddalena’s Profiles in History is set to hold a multi-million-dollar Hollywood memorabilia auction on May 14 and 15, starring one of the most famous automobiles in motion-picture history – the original road-going car from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

The fully functional car, which was the central focus of the now-classic 1968 children’s film, was as important to the storyline as any of its human co-stars. It was designed by Ken Adam and built by the Ford Racing Team to be as authentic as any standard, factory-built car.

The vehicle to be auctioned is not one of the movie’s mock-ups that simulated flying or sailing across the sea; it is the authentic, roadworthy Chitty and is officially registered with the “GEN 11” plates, as seen in the film. A sturdy production, it drove through sand, across cobblestone and down staircases, and remains in impeccable operational condition to this day. It is estimated at $1,000,000 to $2,000,000.

Profiles in History’s 2-day 1,600-lot auction – which will feature Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com – contains nearly 700 lots of coveted items pertaining to Disney animation history. These include a 1924 handwritten letter from Walt Disney to his former colleague and creator of Mickey Mouse, Ub Iwerks. In the letter, Disney expresses his pleasure over Iwerks’ decision to come to Hollywood and join his studio. “The rest is history,” said Joe Maddalena. “The importance of this letter cannot be overstated.” The letter is estimated at $60,000-$80,000.

Other auction highlights include: James Dean’s tweed jacket worn in Rebel Without a Cause, Cecil B. DeMille’s Golden Calf used in The Ten Commandments, an original Cinderella production cel signed by Walt Disney, original watercolor concept art from Fantasia, and an original production cel of the Evil Queen from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, signed by Walt Disney.

Additional top lots include director Mel Stuart’s archive of material from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, featuring a screen-used “Everlasting Gobstopper;” an original Charles Schultz Peanuts 4-panel comic strip from 1963, a Trader Mickey one-sheet poster depicting Mickey and Pluto on a raft being attacked by angry hippos, and Gustaf Tenngren’s original concept painting for Pinocchio, with Pinocchio searching the murky depths of the sea for Monstro the whale. Jeff Bridges’ “The Dude” signature sweater worn throughout The Big Lebowski is also included in the offering of classic entertainment memorabilia.

For additional information on any lot in the sale, call 310-859-7701.


View the fully illustrated catalogs and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

A daughter’s remembrance of Ken Hughes, director of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

LONDON – Opera singer Melinda Hughes, whose late father Ken Hughes (British, 1922-2001) directed and co-wrote the screenplay for Ian Fleming’s Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, was born years after the film was made, but she knows firsthand how much of an impact it has had on multiple generations of children.

“My father was more of an intellectual film director (Cromwell, The Trials of Oscar Wilde), so Chittty wasn’t his most serious film, but it was probably his most famous,” Hughes told Auction Central News. “When I tell my friends about his connection to the film, they’re thrilled. He invented the character of the Child Catcher. Whenever anyone talks about Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, they always remember two things – the car and the Child Catcher.”

Hughes said the screenplay was originally supposed to have been written by the acclaimed novelist Roald Dahl [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, et al.]. “He began the screenplay but was unable to complete it in time, so they asked my father at short notice to come in and take over. He only had a few weeks in which to complete the screenplay before filming began,” said Hughes. “So he not only ended up directing the film, but co-authoring the screenplay, as well.”

Years after Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was released as a movie, at least one of the Chitty cars would take the spotlight yet again, when the stage version of Chitty Chitty opened in 2003 at the London Palladium. It was followed by a theatrical run in New York, beginning in 2005.

“I flew to New York for the U.S. premiere of the play. I remember that there was a big photo shoot set up for the press at a hotel in uptown Manhattan. The car was on a raised section of the stage. At the premiere after-party, I actually sat in the car. It was quite exciting for me,” said Hughes.

When Hughes’ father passed away, American film producer Barbara Broccoli, [daughter of Albert “Cubby” Broccoli, producer of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and the James Bond films] presented her with a special gift. “Barbara had made a beautiful album of stills taken during the filming of Chitty Chitty. There were pictures of my father with Dick Van Dyke and the child actors. Those are very important memories to me – magical memories,” said Hughes.

The creative gene has been passed on to Melinda Hughes, who has been signing opera for the past 15 years. A few years ago, Hughes formed a satirical comedy group called “Kiss & Tell,” which performs at festivals, parties and other events. “We perform what I would call modern-day Noel Coward songs – witty, clever songs of the type that might have been in 1930s Berlin cabarets.” In April, Melinda Hughes released the CD Smoke and Noise, Songs by Mischa Spolianksy and Kiss & Tell.

Click here to purchase Smoke and Noise through Amazon.co.uk.

Melinda Hughes, vocalist on Kiss & Tell's Smoke and Noise. CD available through Amazon.co.uk.

Melinda Hughes, vocalist on Kiss & Tell’s Smoke and Noise. CD available through Amazon.co.uk.


ADDITIONAL AUCTION LOTS OF NOTE


Vintage Pendleton sweater Jeff Bridges wore in the role of ‘The Dude’ in the 1998 cult classic film The Big Lebowski, est. $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Vintage Pendleton sweater Jeff Bridges wore in the role of ‘The Dude’ in the 1998 cult classic film The Big Lebowski, est. $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

1924 letter handwritten by Walt Disney to former collaborator Ub Iwerks, in which Disney expresses his pleasure that Iwerks has agreed to join his new animation studio in California. Est. $60,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

1924 letter handwritten by Walt Disney to former collaborator Ub Iwerks, in which Disney expresses his pleasure that Iwerks has agreed to join his new animation studio in California. Est. $60,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Gustaf Tenngren signed original concept painting for the 1940 Walt Disney film Pinocchio, est. $60,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Gustaf Tenngren signed original concept painting for the 1940 Walt Disney film Pinocchio, est. $60,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Howard Terpning original final-draft poster artwork for the 1963 film Cleopatra, starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton (right), and Rex Harrison (left), 29 x 44 inches, est. $60,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Howard Terpning original final-draft poster artwork for the 1963 film Cleopatra, starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton (right), and Rex Harrison (left), 29 x 44 inches, est. $60,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

John Lennon original manuscript lyrics for the song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, from the LP Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, penned in 1967, est. $200,000-$300,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

John Lennon original manuscript lyrics for the song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, from the LP Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, penned in 1967, est. $200,000-$300,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Original Golden Calf wearing the headdress of Isis, from the 1956 film The Ten Commandments, est. $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Original Golden Calf wearing the headdress of Isis, from the 1956 film The Ten Commandments, est. $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Tweed sport jacket James Dean wore in the role of ‘Jim Stark’ in the 1955 film Rebel Without a Cause, est. $30,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Tweed sport jacket James Dean wore in the role of ‘Jim Stark’ in the 1955 film Rebel Without a Cause, est. $30,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Profiles in History.

Capital Records released ‘Meet the Beatles!' on Jan 20, 1964. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

Signed Beatles album to headline Case’s auction May 21

Capital Records released ‘Meet the Beatles!' on Jan 20, 1964. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

Capital Records released ‘Meet the Beatles!’ on Jan 20, 1964. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

KNOXVILLE – Case Antiques Inc. Auctions & Appraisals will gavel a piece of rock ’n’ roll history: a Meet The Beatles! album signed by all four Beatles the day before their American debut on the Ed Sullivan Show.

The autographed album came from the estate Dr. Jules Gordon, the New York City physician who treated George Harrison for a sore throat on Feb. 8, 1964. The album is included as part of Case’s Spring auction, which will take place May 21 at the company’s Knoxville gallery.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

On Feb. 9, 1964, the Beatles made their much-anticipated American debut on the Ed Sullivan Show. But the day before the show there was concern George Harrison, might miss the big moment because he had strep throat. Thomas Buckley noted in the New York Times on Feb. 8, 1964: “Mr. Harrison, who is known as the quiet Beatle, awoke yesterday with a sore throat. He was treated by Dr. Jules Gordon, used a vaporizer and rejoined his colleagues at the studio late in the afternoon. ‘I should be perfect for tomorrow,’ he said.”

According to George Harrison’s sister, Louise Caldwell, the situation was more serious than they let on. In The Beatles Off The Record by Keith Badman, Caldwell recalled: “The doctor said he couldn’t do the Ed Sullivan Show because he had a temperature of 104. But they pumped him with everything. He was thinking about getting a nurse to administer the medicine, every hour on the hour. Then the doctor suddenly realized that I was there and was his sister and he said to me, ‘Would you see to it? It’s probably just as well that you’re here because I don’t think there’s a single female in the city that isn’t crazy about the Beatles! You’re probably the only one who could function around him normally.’”

The physician who treated Harrison was Dr. Jules Gordon, the house doctor at the Plaza Hotel from 1942 until 1985. Dr. Gordon was called from his fourth-floor office to the Presidential Suites on the 12th floor where the Beatles were staying. As doctor to many celebrities, Dr. Gordon didn’t fawn over The Beatles.

“He was very unassuming and treated everyone with the same respect, no matter who they were. People just took to him,” said a Gordon family member. The Beatles must have liked Dr. Gordon because they gave him several unsolicited personalized autographs. Dr. Gordon met the Beatles on at least two occasions during their visit to New York for the Ed Sullivan Show and commented to his family that the Beatles were very accommodating and likeable each time.

Over the years, as the house physician for the Plaza and other well-known hotels in New York City, Dr. Gordon treated many famous people and Hollywood stars such as Rock Hudson, Bette Davis, Burt Lancaster, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Liz Taylor, Judy Garland and Rita Hayworth. Dr. Gordon, who died in 1993, was also the team physician for the New York Yankees in the 1940s and 1950s. He made the news in 1947 when he performed surgery on Joe DiMaggio and removed a 3-inch spur from his left heel, which enabled Dimaggio to go on to help the Yankees win the 1947 World Series.

The Meet The Beatles! album contained the Beatle’s first U.S. chart-topping hit I Want to Hold Your Hand. It was released in the United States on Jan. 20, just ahead of the band’s first American tour, and less than three weeks before the Beatles signed it for Dr. Gordon.

Autographs by all four Beatles on an LP from their early years are highly sought after by collectors. As Autograph Magazine noted in an article on Jan. 25, 2011, “If you have a Beatles album signed by all four band members, you’ve got something quite valuable. Albums in good condition typically range from about $15,000 for the most common one, Please Please Me, to well over $100,000 for some of the rarest albums, especially U.S. releases. … Band-signed Beatles albums are very hard to come by.”

Although the Meet The Beatles! album in this auction is conservatively estimated at $10,000-$15,000, it is such a unique item that the hammer price could be much higher.

“It’s one of the earliest signed Beatles albums we’re aware of, and for it to be associated with such an important moment in the Beatles’ career makes it even more extraordinary,” said John Case, president of Case Antiques Inc. Auctions & Appraisals.

Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals, based in Knoxville, Tenn., was founded and is owned by John Case, who has over 20 years experience researching and evaluating antiques and art, with a specialization in early Southern decorative arts.

The auction will be held at Case’s gallery in the historic Cherokee Mills Building, 2240 Sutherland Ave. A preview will take place on Friday, May 20, from noon to 6 p.m. Eastern. The sale will begin on Saturday, May 21 at 9:30 a.m. Eastern. For details see www.caseantiques.com or call the gallery in Knoxville at (865) 558-3033.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Capital Records released ‘Meet the Beatles!' on Jan 20, 1964. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

Capital Records released ‘Meet the Beatles!’ on Jan 20, 1964. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

All four of the Beatles signed the back of the album cover. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

All four of the Beatles signed the back of the album cover. Image courtesy of Case Antiques Inc. Auction & Appraisals.

Chinese imperial bronze vases, $660,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Leslie Hindman’s marathon Asian auction tops $4.5 million

Chinese imperial bronze vases, $660,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Chinese imperial bronze vases, $660,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

CHICAGO – With a saleroom packed full of international buyers – the majority from mainland China – more than 700 bidders online through LiveAuctioneers.com, and the auctioneer’s book full of absentee bids, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers chalked up a phenomenal $4.5 million total for Asian art offered on May 3, 2011. The total presale median estimate of the sale had been set at approximately $1 million.

Auctioneer Leslie Hindman commented after the sale: “The auction market for Asian works of art is astounding. The prices realized today were as strong as prices realized at the spring sales in Hong Kong and New York. This market is truly global.”

Asian Works of Art specialist Andrew Lick said, “Vigorous buying throughout the marathon eight-hour auction underscored the Chinese market’s strength and desire to buy traditional works of art.”

The auction’s top lot, a pair of rare Chinese imperial bronze vases valued at $80,000 to $120,000, sold for $660,000 after spirited bidding from no fewer than 10 bidders. An in-house Chinese buyer won the lot as a crowded, noisy saleroom cheered. All prices quoted in this report are inclusive of an in-house buyer’s premium calculated at 22% to $200,000; 20% on that portion from $200,001-$500,000; and 12% on that portion exceeding $500,000.

Two carved rhinoceros horn cups sold for $394,000 each. A lidded white jade vase sold for $231,800, while another surprise came in the form of a jade scholar’s object depicting shells and sea animals. Connoisseurs relished the object’s careful use of natural inclusions to portray the crustaceans, and it sold for $122,000. Both jade prizes came from the Estate of William H. Moore in Hobe Sound, Florida.

Internet bidding through LiveAuctioneers played a major role in the sale’s success, accounting for 211 of the lots sold. The online sell-through rate was 37.08% by lot and 18.67% by value. There were 598 bidder sign-ups and 1,176 absentee bids recorded through LiveAuctioneers. During the sale, 732 participants used LiveAuctioneers’ live-bidding console, lodging 3,673 bids as the event was taking place. Additionally, 1,796 of the underbids were attributable to Internet bidders.

“The traffic to Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ electronic catalog was quite remarkable,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO Julian R. Ellison. “In total, 6,592 people viewed the catalog online, with well over 150,000 page views recorded. Leslie Hindman’s company has made such tremendous inroads into the Asian market. It was among the first of the U.S. auction houses to identify the huge buying potential in the Far East for Asian fine art and antiquities, and their foresight has certainly paid off.”

Consignments are now being accepted for Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ Oct. 4 Asian Works of Art auction. Contact Andrew Lick by e-mailing andrew@lesliehindman.com or calling 312-334-4222.

#   #   #

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Chinese carved rhino-horn cup, $394,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Chinese carved rhino-horn cup, $394,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Chinese carved rhino-horn cup, $394,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Chinese carved rhino-horn cup, $394,000. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

White jade lidded vase, $231,800. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

White jade lidded vase, $231,800. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Jane Peterson (American, 1876-1965), ‘Lotus Flower.’ Estimate $100,000-$150,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Works by Dunning, Peterson in Skinner auction May 20

Jane Peterson (American, 1876-1965), ‘Lotus Flower.’ Estimate $100,000-$150,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Jane Peterson (American, 1876-1965), ‘Lotus Flower.’ Estimate $100,000-$150,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

BOSTON – Skinner Inc. will host an auction of American & European Paintings & Prints on Friday, May 20, in the Boston gallery. The sale offer fresh material from a number of well-established estates and private collections including works from Robert Spear Dunning, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff and Carl Spitzweg, among others.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet Live bidding at the 584-lot auction, which will begin at noon Eastern.

European Paintings

Through the estate of Selma H. and Irving M. Sobin are several works including Karl Schmidt-Rottluff’s Hayfield with Storm Clouds. Schmidt-Rottluff was a founding member of Die Brücke, a group that sought to express “rejection of the older forces of the establishment” through art. The radical anti-academic model they championed helped bring Expressionism into acceptance. By the time Schmidt-Rottluff received public acclaim for his work, the Nazis denounced it as “degenerate,” and banned him from painting. He resumed art-making after the war and the Sobins exhibited the present work in 1958. Lot 478 is estimated at $35,000-$55,000.

Another German work of note is Carl Spitzweg’s Der Briefträger. The scene depicting a letter carrier is likely the rediscovered, final version of this known composition, created circa 1870. Coming from a private collection, the piece hasn’t been on the market for quite some time. Lot 326 is estimated at $70,000-$90,000.

American Paintings

From another private collection is Robert Spear Dunning’s Still Life with Root Vegetables. Co-founder of the Fall River School, Dunning was known as a master of reflective surfaces and for ornate Victorian still lifes inspired by the influx of wealth coming into the area following the Civil War. His pieces often incorporate ripened fruit, flowers and opulent objects set on highly polished tabletops. While it was an unusual choice to paint root vegetables in a worn brass pot, the piece offers all the hallmarks of his style with the meticulous detail as evidenced in his more showy works. Lot 364 is estimated at $70,000-$90,000.

The sale will also feature a fine Jane Peterson piece entitled Lotus Flower. Lot 484 has an estimated value of $100,000-$150,000. Purchased from a private Massachusetts collection circa 1970 by the present Massachusetts owner, Lotus Flower was likely created during World War I when the artist was unable to travel throughout Europe. While more of a portrait, much of the style is reminiscent of the flower pieces she later painted.

From the estate of a New York arts benefactor come several impressive 20th century works, including pieces by Japanese and American artists. Featured in this collection are 3 Janvier 1960 by John Harrison Levee, lot 578, estimated at $1,500-$2,000 and The Shining Waves by Insho Domoto, lot 582, estimated at $1,500-$2,000.

Prints

A strong group of Frank Benson etchings comes from the private collection of Robert Morse. Highlighted are Pintails in Flight over a Marsh, lot 416, estimated at $20,000-$30,000 and The Fishermen, lot 21, which was based on Benson’s painting titled Calm Morning of 1904, currently in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The composition depicts the artist’s three children – Elisabeth, George, and Eleanor – fishing off of the shores of North Haven Island, Maine. The work is estimated at $3,000-$5,000.

Great German Expressionist prints include Conrad Felixmüller’s Bildnis Max Liebermann, lot 75, estimated at $1,000-$1,500 and Emil Nolde’s Frau N (Frau Ada Nolde), lot 147, valued at $8,000-$12,000. The sale also features a highly recognizable M.C. Escher print, Belvedere, lot 72, estimated at $8,000-$12,000 as well as a good grouping of photographs, a much expanded offering from previous sales.

Previews, Catalog and Bidding

Previews for the auction will be held on Wednesday, May 18, from noon to 5 p.m., on Thursday, May 19, from noon to 8 p.m., Fri, May 20, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The Thursday evening preview will feature a reception and gallery walk beginning at 5:30 p.m. RSVP to 617-350-5400.

For details visit www.skinnerinc.com or call 508-970-3000.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


M.C. (Maurits Cornelis) Escher (Dutch, 1898-1972), ‘Belvedere,’ 1958. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

M.C. (Maurits Cornelis) Escher (Dutch, 1898-1972), ‘Belvedere,’ 1958. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Robert Spear Dunning (American, 1829-1905), ‘Still Life with Root Vegetables,’ 1858. Estimate: $70,000-$90,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Robert Spear Dunning (American, 1829-1905), ‘Still Life with Root Vegetables,’ 1858. Estimate: $70,000-$90,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff  (German, 1884-1976), ‘Hayfield with Storm Clouds.’ Estimate: $35,000-$55,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (German, 1884-1976), ‘Hayfield with Storm Clouds.’ Estimate: $35,000-$55,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

1937 Promotional photo of Ginger Rogers for Argentinean Magazine (printed in USA), produced by RKO Pictures and supplied to CINEGRAF.

Ginger Rogers gowns, shoes sold at Ore. fundraiser

1937 Promotional photo of Ginger Rogers for Argentinean Magazine (printed in USA), produced by RKO Pictures and supplied to CINEGRAF.

1937 Promotional photo of Ginger Rogers for Argentinean Magazine (printed in USA), produced by RKO Pictures and supplied to CINEGRAF.

MEDFORD, Ore. (AP) – Actress Ginger Rogers bought a ranch on the Rogue River in 1940 to serve as her sanctuary from the Hollywood madness.

“The ranch was her hideaway and a place she could go and not wear makeup,” said Roberta Olden, Rogers’ former personal secretary.

When Rogers visited Southern Oregon, she put away her gowns in favor of casual clothes she could wear fishing on the Rogue River or picking blackberries to make jam.

Rogers’ presence at her Southern Oregon oasis on the 1,000-acre ranch between Eagle Point and Shady Cove helped to build the region’s reputation as a tourist destination where visitors could be one with nature, Olden said.

Rogers, who died in 1995, left her mark yet again Sunday when some of her most glamorous gowns and shoes were sold at a tea and fashion show to raise money for Southern Oregon Historical Society, an organization dedicated to keeping Rogers and other characters in Southern Oregon’s history alive in the minds of the public.

“It helps to show that history can be very glamorous,” said Allison Weiss, the historical society’s executive director.

Since 1998, the historical society’s budget has withered from more than $2 million to $600,000 per year due to the loss of funding from Jackson County, as well as the economic downturn. The organization relies completely on donations, grants and interest earnings. The event Sunday was expected to raise about $15,000.

Sharon Wesner Becker, wife of Jacksonville Mayor Paul Becker, came up with the idea about six years ago after seeing some of Rogers’ gowns in a closet at Olden’s home in Palm Desert, Calif. Paul Becker was a personal friend of Rogers for 20 years. The idea finally took form this year in honor of the 100th anniversary of Rogers’ birth.

“Ginger was history here,” Sharon Becker said. “She probably was one of our most famous residents.”

Models on Sunday breathed life into 20 of Rogers’ personal gowns and paraded them down a catwalk set up before an audience of about 300 at the Rogue Valley Country Club. Five of the gowns were auctioned off at the end of the event, and 25 pairs of Rogers’ shoes were sold at a silent auction before the fashion show. One of the gowns that Rogers wore in 1981 for an event, titled ‘Texas Women: A Celebration of History,” sold for $1,200.

Rogers bought her Rogue River ranch in 1940, the same year she starred in Kitty Foyle for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress. She visited the ranch when she had time off and wanted some solitude, Olden said. After she retired in 1969, she spent summers at the Southern Oregon ranch and spent the winter in Rancho Mirage, Calif., Olden said.

She used to shop at Quality Market on Jackson Street and the old Safeway, Olden said.

Rogers is the namesake for downtown Medford’s Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater. She performed in the Hunt’s Craterian theater in the 1920s and later, was instrumental in securing the seed money from the Fred Meyer Trust to build the current Craterian theater, which opened in 1997 after Rogers’ death, Paul Becker said.

Becker met Rogers in Los Angeles in 1978 when he worked on a radio station.

“She introduced me to the (Southern Oregon) area, and I fell in love with it,” he said. She also was a draw for others to visit Southern Oregon, including stars such Clark Gable.

Rogers’ magnetism also drew two women from out of state to Medford on Sunday.

Joanne Carlson of Chicago and Whitney Hopler of Fairfax, Va. flew into Southern Oregon especially for the event. Both women said the actress was their role model during difficult times in their childhood.

“She was caring, but she wasn’t a pushover,” Carlson said. “When there was a conflict in my life, I would always ask myself what would she have done.”

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Information from: Mail Tribune, http://www.mailtribune.com/

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


1937 Promotional photo of Ginger Rogers for Argentinean Magazine (printed in USA), produced by RKO Pictures and supplied to CINEGRAF.

1937 Promotional photo of Ginger Rogers for Argentinean Magazine (printed in USA), produced by RKO Pictures and supplied to CINEGRAF.

Former Miss. auctioneer appeals felony conviction

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – During its May-June term, the Mississippi Appellate Court will consider the appeal of former auctioneer Jim Durham, who was sentenced to a nine-year prison term after being convicted on four felony counts of writing bad checks.

Durham was found guilty of the charges in Forrest County in 2010. Prosecutors said Durham, former vice president of Durham Auctions, passed bad checks totaling more than $230,000 including a $125,000 check to the Warren County Board of Supervisors.

Prosecutors said Durham used an escrow account to hold money that should have gone straight to the seller after an auction. They said Durham used the money to pay off loans and investors.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Moron Kuehnert will open the Wedding Dress Auction Event with this Maggie Sottero size 8 gown, which has a suggested retail price of $1,349. Estimate: $350-$700. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Wedding bells are ringing for Morton Kuehnert dress auction May 12

Moron Kuehnert will open the Wedding Dress Auction Event with this Maggie Sottero size 8 gown, which has a suggested retail price of $1,349. Estimate: $350-$700. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Moron Kuehnert will open the Wedding Dress Auction Event with this Maggie Sottero size 8 gown, which has a suggested retail price of $1,349. Estimate: $350-$700. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

HOUSTON – In homage to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the international wedding frenzy, Morton Kuehnert will auction 120 new wedding dresses at its Wedding Dress Auction Event on Thursday, May 12, at 7 p.m. Central. There will be a preview reception beginning at 5 pm.

Auction Central News will provide Internet live bidding.

The gowns may be previewed beginning Monday, May 9, in the Morton Kuehnert showroom/auction house at 4901 Richmond Ave., Houston, TX 77027.

Designer labels include: Maggie Sottero Wedding Collection, Mori Lee, Emerald Wedding Gowns, Paloma Blanca, Jasmine, Casablanca Bridal, Faviana, Eden Bridal, Alfred Angelo, St. Patrick, Angelina Faccenda, Symphony Bridal, Justin Alexander, Scala, Impression, PC Mary’s, Anjolique, Alfred Sung, Allure and Cinderella. Sizes range from 2 to 14, with one size 16.

For more information visit www.mortonkuehnert.com or call 713-827-7835.

 

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Maggie Sottero, style name/number 5053, size 12, retail price: $1,359. Estimate: $350-$700. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Maggie Sottero, style name/number 5053, size 12, retail price: $1,359. Estimate: $350-$700. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Emerald Bridal, style name/number 9126, size 8, retail price $870. Estimate: $200-$400. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Emerald Bridal, style name/number 9126, size 8, retail price $870. Estimate: $200-$400. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Emerald Bridal, style name/number 9126, size 8, retail price $1,070. Estimate: $250-$500. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

Emerald Bridal, style name/number 9126, size 8, retail price $1,070. Estimate: $250-$500. Image courtesy of Morton Kuehnert.

According to a friend, Ai Weiwei has been ordered to pay $1.9 million in back taxes and fines by the Chinese government. Image coutesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Sculptor Kapoor dedicates work to jailed Chinese artist

Ai Weiwei in a June 2007 photo by Benutzer. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Germany license.

Ai Weiwei in a June 2007 photo by Benutzer. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Germany license.

PARIS – (AFP) – British sculptor Anish Kapoor on Tuesday dedicated his new monumental art installation in Paris to the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who is in custody in Beijing accused of unspecified crimes.

“I wish to dedicate my new work, Leviathan at the Grand Palais, Paris, to my colleague Ai Weiwei. His arrest, disappearance and alleged torture are unacceptable,” the Indian-born Kapoor said in a statement sent to AFP.

“When governments silence artists it bears witness to their barbarity.”

Kapoor’s installation goes on display at Paris’s Grand Palais from May 11 to June 23.

The exhibition’s organizers describe it as a vast red sculpture which the visitor will be able to walk inside, as if into the belly of a monster.

Ai, 53, was taken into custody in Beijing on April 3 as he tried to board a flight to Hong Kong, and is under investigation for unspecified “economic crimes”. His relatives say they do not know where he is.

Ai repeatedly challenged Chinese authorities, investigating school collapses in the 2008 quake in the southwestern province of Sichuan, and launching a “citizen’s probe” into a Shanghai fire that killed 58 people in November.

His detention – part of a major government crackdown on dissent, which follows online calls for demonstrations in China to emulate the “Jasmine” protests that have rocked the Arab world – has sparked an outcry in the West.

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Covered teapot recovered from the famous Ca Mau shipwreck off the southern coast of Vietnam, 4 3/8 inches tall, est. $500-$700. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Robert Cornell to auction Asian art collection for charity, May 8

Covered teapot recovered from the famous Ca Mau shipwreck off the southern coast of Vietnam, 4 3/8 inches tall, est. $500-$700. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Covered teapot recovered from the famous Ca Mau shipwreck off the southern coast of Vietnam, 4 3/8 inches tall, est. $500-$700. Asian Antiques Gallery.

HADLEY, Mass. – After 42 years of studying and acquiring Asian art, Robert Cornell of Springfield, Mass., has chosen to sell his collection, with additional quality selections from other consignors, in a series of live online auctions facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com. The first of the series of sales, which operate under the banner of Asian Antiques Gallery, will be held on May 8, 2011, commencing at 6 p.m. Eastern Time. There will not be in-house live bidding for the sale; all bids will be received through LiveAuctioneers.com, using a traditional auction protocol.

The auction will serve as a charitable fundraiser. All profits will be donated to the World Peace Foundation of Hadley, Massachusetts.

“All of the articles to be auctioned have been thoroughly researched, and the auction descriptions are particularly complete, with considerable historical information added to many of the entries,” said Cornell.

The auction inventory includes a wide variety of porcelains – including many pieces recovered from shipwrecks – as well as jades, bronzes, beads, Buddhist items, wood sculptures and tribal silver. Many Southeast Asian nations are represented in the offering, but most of the antiques originated in China prior to the 1911 fall of the Qing Dynasty.

Those who wish to preview the auction material in person may do so at Robert Cornell’s gallery located at 299 Russell St. (Route 9), Hadley, MA 01035. The gallery is 7 minutes east of I-91 exit 19.

Questions regarding any item in the sale may be directed to Robert Cornell by calling 413-582-0032 or e-mailing antiqasia88@yahoo.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet on auction day at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Java bronze-cast rhino, 15th-18th century B.C., 4 3/8 inches long, original hard patina, est. $700-$1,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Java bronze-cast rhino, 15th-18th century B.C., 4 3/8 inches long, original hard patina, est. $700-$1,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Early mosaic bead collection comprised of Roman, Phoenician, Asian beads, est. $3,700-$4,500. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Early mosaic bead collection comprised of Roman, Phoenician, Asian beads, est. $3,700-$4,500. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Three cut-out low-gold figures of 8 3/4-inch Liao Princess and spiritual attendants, est. $5,000-$6,500. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Three cut-out low-gold figures of 8 3/4-inch Liao Princess and spiritual attendants, est. $5,000-$6,500. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Deeply embossed copper tomb art of Buddhist Lion-Protector and other significant figures, 6 1/2 inches wide by 2 inches tall, est. $3,000-$5,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Deeply embossed copper tomb art of Buddhist Lion-Protector and other significant figures, 6 1/2 inches wide by 2 inches tall, est. $3,000-$5,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Gilt-bronze Tibetan Sakyamuni "touching the Earth," 18th-19th century, 6 7/8 inches tall, est. $6,500-$8,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Gilt-bronze Tibetan Sakyamuni "touching the Earth," 18th-19th century, 6 7/8 inches tall, est. $6,500-$8,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Nubian figure, possibly a ball player, Tang Dynasty, 8th-9th century A.D., est. $18,000-$25,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.

Nubian figure, possibly a ball player, Tang Dynasty, 8th-9th century A.D., est. $18,000-$25,000. Asian Antiques Gallery.