Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Saber-tooth cats cut to the chase in I.M. Chait’s July 26 auction

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – Many of the world’s premier natural history collections, both private and institutional, contain prized specimens that previously passed through the doors of I.M. Chait’s Beverly Hills auction gallery. Twice a year, the family-owned company conducts a sale of fossils, minerals, gemstones and prehistoric animal skeletons. Chait’s next natural history auction, slated for Saturday, July 26, 2014, will feature select pieces from all of those categories and more. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Several private collections are represented in the July offering, including the Estate Collection of Marina Louise Schreyer of Switzerland, which features minerals, spheres and other lapidary works; and a private East Coast collection of fossils and lapidary works that includes a complete dinosaur head, ammonites and a large amethyst geode mounted as a table.

The star of the show, which is featured on cover of the auction catalog, is a display of two fully articulated Dinictis feline (saber-toothed cats), locking in mortal combat with their fearsome jaws agape. The two skeletons were recovered in 1998 and 1999 from separate private ranches in South Dakota’s White River Badlands regions.

“No comparable display specimens of the same quality and originality exist in either private or museum collections,” said Jake Chait, director of I.M. Chait’s Natural History department.

The Dinictis is one of the earliest saber-toothed cats to appear in the fossil record, 38-34 million years ago. It was a member of the Nimravidae family – the “false” saber-toothed cats – which were similar but not related to the later Felidae (true cats).

Their hyper-developed canine teeth were essentially finely serrated knives, specialized for killing or feeding. Scientists believe that elongate sabers were specialized for severing either the windpipe or jugular of a prey animal after they were brought down, allowing the cat to administer a swift ‘coup de grace’ to immobilize its prey, Chait said.

The skeletons in the display are in outstanding condition, preserved and mounted to the very highest standards. By bone count, they are 50-60% and 70-80% complete, respectively. As top lot of the sale, the three-dimensional depiction of a prehistoric catfight is expected to make $200,000-$250,000.

Other fascinating zoological entries include a very large and well-preserved Mammuthus primigenius (“Mammoth”) tusk found in Alaska and dating to the Ice Age, estimate $60,000-$70,000; a superbly mounted “flying dinosaur” posed as though in flight, estimate $110,000-$140,000; and what may be the world’s longest known example of dinosaur coprolite (fossilized dung). Measuring 3 feet 4 inches long, it could sell for $8,000-$10,000. Additionally, the sale features lapidary works of art, various investment-grade fossils, minerals and gemstones; and petrified wood from multiple American estates.

Mummy parts are intriguing and extremely hard to come by. The July 26 auction offers collectors a rare opportunity in the form of an Egyptian mummified female hand. “The hand was purchased from a museum many years ago and has since remained in a private collection,” Chait noted. Estimate: $3,000-$4,000.

Now that the United States has terminated its manned space shuttle program, auction prices on geological specimens from the moon and beyond have shot through the stratosphere. I.M. Chait’s sale includes a vial of Martian dust – not from a NASA Mars mission, since astronauts have yet to set foot on the Red Planet, but from a Martian meteorite that hit the earth millions of years ago. The meteorite was discovered in the Sahara Desert in 2009. The 1¼-inch vial is expected to reach $550-$700 at auction.

Recovered in southern Morocco in early 2012, a meteorite believed to be from the planet Mercury – the first of its kind to be identified as such – has an approximate age of 4.56 billion years. Its composition is consistent with Mercury data obtained by the Messenger spacecraft, which has been orbiting the planet closest to the sun since early 2011. “This is the type of specimen that ends up in a connoisseur’s collection,” said Chait. “It’s rare and historically very significant.” Estimate: $42,500-$46,000.

An exciting selection of meteorites and other extraterrestrial material (from the moon and Mars); and quality space memorabilia from a private Los Angeles collector add to the variety available to bidders in the 360-lot sale.

I.M. Chait’s Important Natural History Auction will take place at the Chait gallery on Saturday, July 26, 2014, commencing at 1 p.m. Pacific Time (4 p.m. Eastern). The gallery is located at 9330 Civic Center Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90210. For additional information on any item in the auction, call 1-800-775-5020 or 310-285-0182; or e-mail jake@chait.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Mounted display of two fully articulated Dinictis felina, or saber-toothed cats, engaged in combat. Origin: White River Badlands, South Dakota. Estimate: $200,000-$250,000. I.M. Chait image

Mounted display of two fully articulated Dinictis felina, or saber-toothed cats, engaged in combat. Origin: White River Badlands, South Dakota. Estimate: $200,000-$250,000. I.M. Chait image

Mummified female hand, Ptolemaic period. Origin: Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt. Estimate: $3,000-$4,000. I.M. Chait image

Mummified female hand, Ptolemaic period. Origin: Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt. Estimate: $3,000-$4,000. I.M. Chait image

Measuring 40 inches, possibly the longest known example of fossilized dinosaur dung, also known as a coprolite. Origin: Wilkes Formation, Toledo, Lewis County, Washington. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. I.M. Chait image

Measuring 40 inches, possibly the longest known example of fossilized dinosaur dung, also known as a coprolite. Origin: Wilkes Formation, Toledo, Lewis County, Washington. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. I.M. Chait image

Vial containing particles of the Martian meteorite NWA 5790, discovered in 2009 in Mauritania, in the Sahara Desert. Estimate: $550-$700. I.M. Chait image

Vial containing particles of the Martian meteorite NWA 5790, discovered in 2009 in Mauritania, in the Sahara Desert. Estimate: $550-$700. I.M. Chait image

First meteorite believed to be from the planet Mercury, found in 2012 in southern Morocco. Estimate: $42,500-$46,000. I.M. Chait image

First meteorite believed to be from the planet Mercury, found in 2012 in southern Morocco. Estimate: $42,500-$46,000. I.M. Chait image

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Saber-tooth cats cut to the chase in I.M. Chait’s July 26 auction

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – Many of the world’s premier natural history collections, both private and institutional, contain prized specimens that previously passed through the doors of I.M. Chait’s Beverly Hills auction gallery. Twice a year, the family-owned company conducts a sale of fossils, minerals, gemstones and prehistoric animal skeletons. Chait’s next natural history auction, slated for Saturday, July 26, 2014, will feature select pieces from all of those categories and more. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Several private collections are represented in the July offering, including the Estate Collection of Marina Louise Schreyer of Switzerland, which features minerals, spheres and other lapidary works; and a private East Coast collection of fossils and lapidary works that includes a complete dinosaur head, ammonites and a large amethyst geode mounted as a table.

The star of the show, which is featured on cover of the auction catalog, is a display of two fully articulated Dinictis feline (saber-toothed cats), locking in mortal combat with their fearsome jaws agape. The two skeletons were recovered in 1998 and 1999 from separate private ranches in South Dakota’s White River Badlands regions.

“No comparable display specimens of the same quality and originality exist in either private or museum collections,” said Jake Chait, director of I.M. Chait’s Natural History department.

The Dinictis is one of the earliest saber-toothed cats to appear in the fossil record, 38-34 million years ago. It was a member of the Nimravidae family – the “false” saber-toothed cats – which were similar but not related to the later Felidae (true cats).

Their hyper-developed canine teeth were essentially finely serrated knives, specialized for killing or feeding. Scientists believe that elongate sabers were specialized for severing either the windpipe or jugular of a prey animal after they were brought down, allowing the cat to administer a swift ‘coup de grace’ to immobilize its prey, Chait said.

The skeletons in the display are in outstanding condition, preserved and mounted to the very highest standards. By bone count, they are 50-60% and 70-80% complete, respectively. As top lot of the sale, the three-dimensional depiction of a prehistoric catfight is expected to make $200,000-$250,000.

Other fascinating zoological entries include a very large and well-preserved Mammuthus primigenius (“Mammoth”) tusk found in Alaska and dating to the Ice Age, estimate $60,000-$70,000; a superbly mounted “flying dinosaur” posed as though in flight, estimate $110,000-$140,000; and what may be the world’s longest known example of dinosaur coprolite (fossilized dung). Measuring 3 feet 4 inches long, it could sell for $8,000-$10,000. Additionally, the sale features lapidary works of art, various investment-grade fossils, minerals and gemstones; and petrified wood from multiple American estates.

Mummy parts are intriguing and extremely hard to come by. The July 26 auction offers collectors a rare opportunity in the form of an Egyptian mummified female hand. “The hand was purchased from a museum many years ago and has since remained in a private collection,” Chait noted. Estimate: $3,000-$4,000.

Now that the United States has terminated its manned space shuttle program, auction prices on geological specimens from the moon and beyond have shot through the stratosphere. I.M. Chait’s sale includes a vial of Martian dust – not from a NASA Mars mission, since astronauts have yet to set foot on the Red Planet, but from a Martian meteorite that hit the earth millions of years ago. The meteorite was discovered in the Sahara Desert in 2009. The 1¼-inch vial is expected to reach $550-$700 at auction.

Recovered in southern Morocco in early 2012, a meteorite believed to be from the planet Mercury – the first of its kind to be identified as such – has an approximate age of 4.56 billion years. Its composition is consistent with Mercury data obtained by the Messenger spacecraft, which has been orbiting the planet closest to the sun since early 2011. “This is the type of specimen that ends up in a connoisseur’s collection,” said Chait. “It’s rare and historically very significant.” Estimate: $42,500-$46,000.

An exciting selection of meteorites and other extraterrestrial material (from the moon and Mars); and quality space memorabilia from a private Los Angeles collector add to the variety available to bidders in the 360-lot sale.

I.M. Chait’s Important Natural History Auction will take place at the Chait gallery on Saturday, July 26, 2014, commencing at 1 p.m. Pacific Time (4 p.m. Eastern). The gallery is located at 9330 Civic Center Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90210. For additional information on any item in the auction, call 1-800-775-5020 or 310-285-0182; or e-mail jake@chait.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Ice Age Mammuthus primigenius (Mammoth) tusk, 93¼ in long as measured around the curve. Origin: Alaska. Estimate: $60,000-$70,000. I.M. Chait image

Mounted display of two fully articulated Dinictis felina, or saber-toothed cats, engaged in combat. Origin: White River Badlands, South Dakota. Estimate: $200,000-$250,000. I.M. Chait image

Mounted display of two fully articulated Dinictis felina, or saber-toothed cats, engaged in combat. Origin: White River Badlands, South Dakota. Estimate: $200,000-$250,000. I.M. Chait image

Mummified female hand, Ptolemaic period. Origin: Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt. Estimate: $3,000-$4,000. I.M. Chait image

Mummified female hand, Ptolemaic period. Origin: Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt. Estimate: $3,000-$4,000. I.M. Chait image

Measuring 40 inches, possibly the longest known example of fossilized dinosaur dung, also known as a coprolite. Origin: Wilkes Formation, Toledo, Lewis County, Washington. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. I.M. Chait image

Measuring 40 inches, possibly the longest known example of fossilized dinosaur dung, also known as a coprolite. Origin: Wilkes Formation, Toledo, Lewis County, Washington. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. I.M. Chait image

Vial containing particles of the Martian meteorite NWA 5790, discovered in 2009 in Mauritania, in the Sahara Desert. Estimate: $550-$700. I.M. Chait image

Vial containing particles of the Martian meteorite NWA 5790, discovered in 2009 in Mauritania, in the Sahara Desert. Estimate: $550-$700. I.M. Chait image

First meteorite believed to be from the planet Mercury, found in 2012 in southern Morocco. Estimate: $42,500-$46,000. I.M. Chait image

First meteorite believed to be from the planet Mercury, found in 2012 in southern Morocco. Estimate: $42,500-$46,000. I.M. Chait image

Viscount Linley (right) and his chief designer Michael Noah on the Linley stand at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

London Eye: June 2014

Viscount Linley (right) and his chief designer Michael Noah on the  Linley stand at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Viscount Linley (right) and his chief designer Michael Noah on the Linley stand at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

LONDON – David Armstrong-Jones, better known as Viscount Linley, is no ordinary member of the British Royal Family. Chairman of auction house Christie’s, he is also a craftsman designer of distinction whose bespoke furniture is in keen demand among wealthy clients the world over. (Fig. 1)

Yet despite his international reputation and high-class client list, David Linley was never allowed to show his furniture at the Grosvenor House Art & Antiques Fair which, until it closed in 2009, was regarded as London’s most prestigious art fair. “I was banned from the Grosvenor House Fair,” Linley told invited visitors to his company’s stand at the Masterpiece London Fair in Chelsea this week. “The fact that we are welcomed here at Masterpiece reveals how much things have changed,” he added.

Masterpiece London, founded in 2010, was established not only to fill the art market vacuum created by the demise of the Grosvenor House event, but also to satisfy the booming demand among the world’s wealthiest individuals for a range of ‘conspicuous consumption’ goods such as Maserati motor cars, contemporary jewellery, and gold-plated sculptures of Kate Moss by the likes of Marc Quinn.

The gold-plated bronze sculpture of supermodel Kate Moss in  contorted pose by Marc Quinn, brought to Masterpiece London by Modern  British dealers Osborne Samuel. Image Auction Central News.

The gold-plated bronze sculpture of supermodel Kate Moss in contorted pose by Marc Quinn, brought to Masterpiece London by Modern British dealers Osborne Samuel. Image Auction Central News.

Masterpieces of hand-crafted furniture also fit comfortably within that broad mix. One of Linley’s specially-commissioned ‘tailor-made’ four-fold screens in dark oak with rose-gold inlaid details will set you back in the region of £100,000 ($170,365).

Michael Noah, chief designer at Linley, shows visitors a unique four- fold screen on the company’s stand at Masterpiece London. Price in the region  of £100,000 ($170,365). Image Auction Central News.

Michael Noah, chief designer at Linley, shows visitors a unique four- fold screen on the company’s stand at Masterpiece London. Price in the region of £100,000 ($170,365). Image Auction Central News.

Now in its fifth year, Masterpiece London is smaller and thus more manageable than the enormous European Fine Art Fair that takes place annually in Maastricht in March. The broad consensus among the Masterpiece exhibitors we spoke to was that the fair had matured and finally found its own level. It was also attracting its fair share of art world personalities. We spotted über-collector Charles Saatchi strolling the aisles

Collector Charles Saatchi stops to chat to friends at Masterpiece  London. Image Auction Central News.

Collector Charles Saatchi stops to chat to friends at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Even White Cube boss Jay Jopling, normally more at home at uncompromisingly contemporary events such as Frieze or Art Basel, dropped by to take a look.
Contemporary art dealer Jay Jopling visits the Masterpiece London  art fair on June 26. Image Auction Central News.

Contemporary art dealer Jay Jopling visits the Masterpiece London art fair on June 26. Image Auction Central News.

Abby Hignell, long-serving manager at London’s Bowman Sculpture gallery, told Auction Central News that she sensed the fair had “come into its own,” adding that, “the atmosphere felt more positive and relaxed than in previous years.”

Abby Hignell of Bowman Sculpture with works by Helaine Blumenfeld  at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Abby Hignell of Bowman Sculpture with works by Helaine Blumenfeld at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Ms Hignell was encouraged by having successfully sold a very fine bronze cast of The Abduction of Hippodamie by leading French romantic sculptor Albert-Ernest Carrier Belleuse to the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. The work was modelled in 1871 when Auguste Rodin was in the employ of Carrier-Belleuse, making it all the more academically interesting.
An “exceptional cast” of ‘The Abduction of Hippodamie’, dated 1871,  modelled by Auguste Rodin while in the employ of Albert-Ernest Carrier  Belleuse. Sold by Bowman Sculpture to the Art Gallery of Ontario at  Masterpiece London. Image courtesy of Bowman Sculpture.

An “exceptional cast” of ‘The Abduction of Hippodamie’, dated 1871, modelled by Auguste Rodin while in the employ of Albert-Ernest Carrier Belleuse. Sold by Bowman Sculpture to the Art Gallery of Ontario at Masterpiece London. Image courtesy of Bowman Sculpture.

Robert Bowman is among the leading dealers in Rodin’s work and he and Ms Hignell have also helped organise an important symposium on the artist’s work to be held at the Victoria and Albert Museum on July 12, celebrating the centenary of Rodin’s significant gift of 18 works to the V&A in 1914.

Sculpture was generally well-represented at this year’s Masterpiece. With dramatic bravado Gerry Farrell, of Sladmore Gallery, transplanted the entire studio of sculptor Nic Fiddian-Green onto the Sladmore stand at Masterpiece.

Gerry Farrell of London’s Sladmore Gallery, who transplanted, in its  entirety, the studio of equine sculptor Nic Fiddian-Green into Masterpiece  London. They won the fair’s ‘Best Stand Award’. Image Auction Central News.

Gerry Farrell of London’s Sladmore Gallery, who transplanted, in its entirety, the studio of equine sculptor Nic Fiddian-Green into Masterpiece London. They won the fair’s ‘Best Stand Award’. Image Auction Central News.

The installation included every minuscule detail of the artist’s Surrey hill-top studio, including plaster dust, welding gear, maquettes and drawings…and even a crumpled Coca Cola can. “Nic’s work is all about the handmade, the craft of sculpture,” said Mr Farrell. “We wanted to communicate that approach and also do something authentic and different.” His efforts paid off, winning the Best Stand Award at this year’s fair.

Art fairs are steadily replacing the traditional bricks and mortar gallery-based way of doing business. When dealers like Sladmore take a risk with their stand it not only makes for good publicity, it also enhances the visitor experience for these sprawling marquee events can be exhausting things to attend. Thankfully there is often a sculpture park to relax in afterwards, weather permitting. This year’s outdoor display in Ranelagh Gardens in the Royal Hospital, Chelsea was devoted to the work of Philip King, the veteran British exponent of coloured sculpture, who celebrates his 80th birthday this year.

The work of veteran British sculptor Philip King on display in  Ranelagh Gardens adjacent to Masterpiece London, in cooperation with  Thomas Dane Gallery. Image Auction Central News.

The work of veteran British sculptor Philip King on display in Ranelagh Gardens adjacent to Masterpiece London, in cooperation with Thomas Dane Gallery. Image Auction Central News.

Needless to say, strolling aisle upon aisle of blue-chip luxury goods can be tough on the strongest of legs, so the Masterpiece organisers charitably provide golf buggies to ferry visitors from the Royal Hospital Garden gates to the fair marquee.

Masterpiece London kindly provided courtesy golf buggies to ferry  visitors from the gates of the Royal Hospital grounds to the fair marquee.  Image Auction Central News.

Masterpiece London kindly provided courtesy golf buggies to ferry visitors from the gates of the Royal Hospital grounds to the fair marquee. Image Auction Central News.

There is now an art fair of some kind in London most months of the year. Masterpiece arrived just a fortnight or so after Art Antiques London closed in Kensington Gardens. Quite how long art fairs can continue to proliferate before the market collapses from over-nourishment remains to be seen. Art Antiques London delivered a host of significant sales, however, so it seems that, for the present at least, the demand is there to meet the seemingly endless supply.

London ceramics dealers Bazaart sold this rare terracotta vase from  the Wonderland Pottery, Bombay School of Art, circa 1880, for £15,000  ($25,500) at Art Antiques London in mid-June. Image courtesy Bazaart and  Art Antiques London.

London ceramics dealers Bazaart sold this rare terracotta vase from the Wonderland Pottery, Bombay School of Art, circa 1880, for £15,000 ($25,500) at Art Antiques London in mid-June. Image courtesy Bazaart and Art Antiques London.

It perhaps goes without saying that art fairs like Art Antiques London and Masterpiece benefit significantly from the capital’s status as a leading financial centre. Middle-class Asian and Russian private investors are pumping the capital’s property boom, but they are also driving prices in the art market. The Financial Times recently quoted property group Jones Lang Lasalle predicting that, “Russian capital flight could quadruple year-on-year,” so the market seems likely to remain buoyant for the immediate future. This may also have been a factor in the success of specialist Russian art auction house MacDougall’s recent sale in London where a private collector secured Pavel Kuznetsov’s avant-garde masterpiece of 1912 entitled ‘Eastern City, Bukhara’, for a new auction record for the artist at £2,367,600 ($4,030,000).

Pavel Kuznetsov’s ‘Eastern City, Bukhara’, which set a new auction  record for the artist at £2,367,600 ($4,030,000) at MacDougall’s sale of  Russian art on 4 June. Image courtesy of MacDougall’s.

Pavel Kuznetsov’s ‘Eastern City, Bukhara’, which set a new auction record for the artist at £2,367,600 ($4,030,000) at MacDougall’s sale of Russian art on 4 June. Image courtesy of MacDougall’s.

Away from the fairs circuit, independent curators and art historians continue to excavate seams of creativity from earlier periods, offering a reminder that the current obsession with contemporary art is not the only show in town. The tiny Nunnery Gallery in Bow in the East End currently has an exhibition of work by the all too long-neglected East London Group of artists. One of the group’s claims to what little fame it enjoyed was that the great Walter Richard Sickert was among its visiting instructors. But this sparkling little gem of a show reveals that there was much more to the group than a famous teacher. Although by no means household names, the group’s members nevertheless had an unerring facility for capturing the very particular ambience of the East London urban scene. Some of the works have an appealing noir quality reminiscent of Edward Hopper: lonely buildings, deserted streets, decommissioned industrial structures — many of which have since been replaced by flyovers and other developments. All, however, are rendered with a touching intimacy. This is one of those rare, ‘must-see’ exhibitions that makes the trip out to the distant East End a most worthwhile safari.

‘Bow Bridge’ by Walter J. Steggles of the East London Group at  Nunnery Gallery in Bow. Image courtesy of the Nunnery Gallery.

‘Bow Bridge’ by Walter J. Steggles of the East London Group at Nunnery Gallery in Bow. Image courtesy of the Nunnery Gallery.

‘Demolition of Bow Brewery’ by Elwin Hawthorne, in East London  Group show at Nunnery Gallery, Bow. Image courtesy of Clive Boutle and  Nunnery Gallery, Bow.

‘Demolition of Bow Brewery’ by Elwin Hawthorne, in East London Group show at Nunnery Gallery, Bow. Image courtesy of Clive Boutle and Nunnery Gallery, Bow.

#   #   #

Viscount Linley (right) and his chief designer Michael Noah on the Linley stand at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

London Eye: June 2014

Viscount Linley (right) and his chief designer Michael Noah on the  Linley stand at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Viscount Linley (right) and his chief designer Michael Noah on the Linley stand at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

LONDON – David Armstrong-Jones, better known as Viscount Linley, is no ordinary member of the British Royal Family. Chairman of auction house Christie’s, he is also a craftsman designer of distinction whose bespoke furniture is in keen demand among wealthy clients the world over. (Fig. 1)

Yet despite his international reputation and high-class client list, David Linley was never allowed to show his furniture at the Grosvenor House Art & Antiques Fair which, until it closed in 2009, was regarded as London’s most prestigious art fair. “I was banned from the Grosvenor House Fair,” Linley told invited visitors to his company’s stand at the Masterpiece London Fair in Chelsea this week. “The fact that we are welcomed here at Masterpiece reveals how much things have changed,” he added.

Masterpiece London, founded in 2010, was established not only to fill the art market vacuum created by the demise of the Grosvenor House event, but also to satisfy the booming demand among the world’s wealthiest individuals for a range of ‘conspicuous consumption’ goods such as Maserati motor cars, contemporary jewellery, and gold-plated sculptures of Kate Moss by the likes of Marc Quinn.

The gold-plated bronze sculpture of supermodel Kate Moss in  contorted pose by Marc Quinn, brought to Masterpiece London by Modern  British dealers Osborne Samuel. Image Auction Central News.

The gold-plated bronze sculpture of supermodel Kate Moss in contorted pose by Marc Quinn, brought to Masterpiece London by Modern British dealers Osborne Samuel. Image Auction Central News.

Masterpieces of hand-crafted furniture also fit comfortably within that broad mix. One of Linley’s specially-commissioned ‘tailor-made’ four-fold screens in dark oak with rose-gold inlaid details will set you back in the region of £100,000 ($170,365).

Michael Noah, chief designer at Linley, shows visitors a unique four- fold screen on the company’s stand at Masterpiece London. Price in the region  of £100,000 ($170,365). Image Auction Central News.

Michael Noah, chief designer at Linley, shows visitors a unique four- fold screen on the company’s stand at Masterpiece London. Price in the region of £100,000 ($170,365). Image Auction Central News.

Now in its fifth year, Masterpiece London is smaller and thus more manageable than the enormous European Fine Art Fair that takes place annually in Maastricht in March. The broad consensus among the Masterpiece exhibitors we spoke to was that the fair had matured and finally found its own level. It was also attracting its fair share of art world personalities. We spotted über-collector Charles Saatchi strolling the aisles

Collector Charles Saatchi stops to chat to friends at Masterpiece  London. Image Auction Central News.

Collector Charles Saatchi stops to chat to friends at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Even White Cube boss Jay Jopling, normally more at home at uncompromisingly contemporary events such as Frieze or Art Basel, dropped by to take a look.
Contemporary art dealer Jay Jopling visits the Masterpiece London  art fair on June 26. Image Auction Central News.

Contemporary art dealer Jay Jopling visits the Masterpiece London art fair on June 26. Image Auction Central News.

Abby Hignell, long-serving manager at London’s Bowman Sculpture gallery, told Auction Central News that she sensed the fair had “come into its own,” adding that, “the atmosphere felt more positive and relaxed than in previous years.”

Abby Hignell of Bowman Sculpture with works by Helaine Blumenfeld  at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Abby Hignell of Bowman Sculpture with works by Helaine Blumenfeld at Masterpiece London. Image Auction Central News.

Ms Hignell was encouraged by having successfully sold a very fine bronze cast of The Abduction of Hippodamie by leading French romantic sculptor Albert-Ernest Carrier Belleuse to the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. The work was modelled in 1871 when Auguste Rodin was in the employ of Carrier-Belleuse, making it all the more academically interesting.
An “exceptional cast” of ‘The Abduction of Hippodamie’, dated 1871,  modelled by Auguste Rodin while in the employ of Albert-Ernest Carrier  Belleuse. Sold by Bowman Sculpture to the Art Gallery of Ontario at  Masterpiece London. Image courtesy of Bowman Sculpture.

An “exceptional cast” of ‘The Abduction of Hippodamie’, dated 1871, modelled by Auguste Rodin while in the employ of Albert-Ernest Carrier Belleuse. Sold by Bowman Sculpture to the Art Gallery of Ontario at Masterpiece London. Image courtesy of Bowman Sculpture.

Robert Bowman is among the leading dealers in Rodin’s work and he and Ms Hignell have also helped organise an important symposium on the artist’s work to be held at the Victoria and Albert Museum on July 12, celebrating the centenary of Rodin’s significant gift of 18 works to the V&A in 1914.

Sculpture was generally well-represented at this year’s Masterpiece. With dramatic bravado Gerry Farrell, of Sladmore Gallery, transplanted the entire studio of sculptor Nic Fiddian-Green onto the Sladmore stand at Masterpiece.

Gerry Farrell of London’s Sladmore Gallery, who transplanted, in its  entirety, the studio of equine sculptor Nic Fiddian-Green into Masterpiece  London. They won the fair’s ‘Best Stand Award’. Image Auction Central News.

Gerry Farrell of London’s Sladmore Gallery, who transplanted, in its entirety, the studio of equine sculptor Nic Fiddian-Green into Masterpiece London. They won the fair’s ‘Best Stand Award’. Image Auction Central News.

The installation included every minuscule detail of the artist’s Surrey hill-top studio, including plaster dust, welding gear, maquettes and drawings…and even a crumpled Coca Cola can. “Nic’s work is all about the handmade, the craft of sculpture,” said Mr Farrell. “We wanted to communicate that approach and also do something authentic and different.” His efforts paid off, winning the Best Stand Award at this year’s fair.

Art fairs are steadily replacing the traditional bricks and mortar gallery-based way of doing business. When dealers like Sladmore take a risk with their stand it not only makes for good publicity, it also enhances the visitor experience for these sprawling marquee events can be exhausting things to attend. Thankfully there is often a sculpture park to relax in afterwards, weather permitting. This year’s outdoor display in Ranelagh Gardens in the Royal Hospital, Chelsea was devoted to the work of Philip King, the veteran British exponent of coloured sculpture, who celebrates his 80th birthday this year.

The work of veteran British sculptor Philip King on display in  Ranelagh Gardens adjacent to Masterpiece London, in cooperation with  Thomas Dane Gallery. Image Auction Central News.

The work of veteran British sculptor Philip King on display in Ranelagh Gardens adjacent to Masterpiece London, in cooperation with Thomas Dane Gallery. Image Auction Central News.

Needless to say, strolling aisle upon aisle of blue-chip luxury goods can be tough on the strongest of legs, so the Masterpiece organisers charitably provide golf buggies to ferry visitors from the Royal Hospital Garden gates to the fair marquee.

Masterpiece London kindly provided courtesy golf buggies to ferry  visitors from the gates of the Royal Hospital grounds to the fair marquee.  Image Auction Central News.

Masterpiece London kindly provided courtesy golf buggies to ferry visitors from the gates of the Royal Hospital grounds to the fair marquee. Image Auction Central News.

There is now an art fair of some kind in London most months of the year. Masterpiece arrived just a fortnight or so after Art Antiques London closed in Kensington Gardens. Quite how long art fairs can continue to proliferate before the market collapses from over-nourishment remains to be seen. Art Antiques London delivered a host of significant sales, however, so it seems that, for the present at least, the demand is there to meet the seemingly endless supply.

London ceramics dealers Bazaart sold this rare terracotta vase from  the Wonderland Pottery, Bombay School of Art, circa 1880, for £15,000  ($25,500) at Art Antiques London in mid-June. Image courtesy Bazaart and  Art Antiques London.

London ceramics dealers Bazaart sold this rare terracotta vase from the Wonderland Pottery, Bombay School of Art, circa 1880, for £15,000 ($25,500) at Art Antiques London in mid-June. Image courtesy Bazaart and Art Antiques London.

It perhaps goes without saying that art fairs like Art Antiques London and Masterpiece benefit significantly from the capital’s status as a leading financial centre. Middle-class Asian and Russian private investors are pumping the capital’s property boom, but they are also driving prices in the art market. The Financial Times recently quoted property group Jones Lang Lasalle predicting that, “Russian capital flight could quadruple year-on-year,” so the market seems likely to remain buoyant for the immediate future. This may also have been a factor in the success of specialist Russian art auction house MacDougall’s recent sale in London where a private collector secured Pavel Kuznetsov’s avant-garde masterpiece of 1912 entitled ‘Eastern City, Bukhara’, for a new auction record for the artist at £2,367,600 ($4,030,000).

Pavel Kuznetsov’s ‘Eastern City, Bukhara’, which set a new auction  record for the artist at £2,367,600 ($4,030,000) at MacDougall’s sale of  Russian art on 4 June. Image courtesy of MacDougall’s.

Pavel Kuznetsov’s ‘Eastern City, Bukhara’, which set a new auction record for the artist at £2,367,600 ($4,030,000) at MacDougall’s sale of Russian art on 4 June. Image courtesy of MacDougall’s.

Away from the fairs circuit, independent curators and art historians continue to excavate seams of creativity from earlier periods, offering a reminder that the current obsession with contemporary art is not the only show in town. The tiny Nunnery Gallery in Bow in the East End currently has an exhibition of work by the all too long-neglected East London Group of artists. One of the group’s claims to what little fame it enjoyed was that the great Walter Richard Sickert was among its visiting instructors. But this sparkling little gem of a show reveals that there was much more to the group than a famous teacher. Although by no means household names, the group’s members nevertheless had an unerring facility for capturing the very particular ambience of the East London urban scene. Some of the works have an appealing noir quality reminiscent of Edward Hopper: lonely buildings, deserted streets, decommissioned industrial structures — many of which have since been replaced by flyovers and other developments. All, however, are rendered with a touching intimacy. This is one of those rare, ‘must-see’ exhibitions that makes the trip out to the distant East End a most worthwhile safari.

‘Bow Bridge’ by Walter J. Steggles of the East London Group at  Nunnery Gallery in Bow. Image courtesy of the Nunnery Gallery.

‘Bow Bridge’ by Walter J. Steggles of the East London Group at Nunnery Gallery in Bow. Image courtesy of the Nunnery Gallery.

‘Demolition of Bow Brewery’ by Elwin Hawthorne, in East London  Group show at Nunnery Gallery, Bow. Image courtesy of Clive Boutle and  Nunnery Gallery, Bow.

‘Demolition of Bow Brewery’ by Elwin Hawthorne, in East London Group show at Nunnery Gallery, Bow. Image courtesy of Clive Boutle and Nunnery Gallery, Bow.

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Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Fendi unveils suspended walkway over Rome’s Trevi fountain

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

ROME (AFP) – Fashion house Fendi kicked off the restoration of Rome’s famed Trevi Fountain Monday, unveiling a transparent suspended walkway which will give tourists a whole new vantage point of the historic monument.

Though the fountain has been drained for the renovation, a small basin has been set up at the rim so that visitors can continue the tradition of throwing a coin into the waters with their back turned — a custom which is said to bring good luck.

“The restoration works are invasive and will be disruptive for the thousands of tourists who come every day, but we thought the walkway would be the best way to show off the fountain,” Fendi’s CEO Pietro Beccari told AFP.

The plexiglass bridge “is a way to show people the fountain from a position no one has been in before,” he said.

While much of the elaborate Baroque facade is now hidden under scaffolding, tourists crossing the basin on the walkway will be able to get a close look at the restoration as it takes place.

The 2.18 million euro ($2.98 million) repairs on the nearly 300-year-old fountain will take 18 months, Beccari said.

While some tourists said they were curious to try out the bridge, others complained about finding one of the most iconic monuments in Italy under wraps.

“We were very surprised because we thought we were just going to throw a penny in the fountain. But I’m kind of excited to see what is going on here,” said American tourist Pat, while Coco from Hong Kong said he was “really quite disappointed” to find the basin empty of water.

There had been concern about the state of the Trevi Fountain, which is visited by millions of tourists every year, particularly after bits of its elaborate cornice began falling off in 2012 following a particularly harsh winter.

“Patronage is essential in maintaining and restoring our marvelous works of architecture, archaeology and art,” Rome’s mayor Ignazio Marino said, as he chucked a coin over his shoulder into the temporary basin.

Fendi, founded as a leather goods business in Rome in the 1920s and now part of French luxury giant LVMH, will also be funding the restoration of the Quattro Fontane, late Renaissance fountains which grace each corner of a busy intersection in the capital.

It is not the only fashion house to fund the renovation of the eternal city’s monuments: luxury jeweler Bulgari announced earlier this year that it would help clean up the city’s famous Spanish Steps, while shoemaker Tod’s is financing works at the Colosseum.

Under the deal with Rome city authorities, Fendi’s logo can be displayed on building site signs during the repairs and the company can hang a plaque near the monuments for four years after completion.

The Trevi Fountain, commissioned by Pope Clement XII in 1730, is the end point of one of the aqueducts that supplied ancient Rome with water.

It famously featured in a scene of Federico Fellini’s iconic film “La Dolce Vita” in which Marcello Mastroianni and co-star Anita Ekberg share a kiss while wading through its pristine waters.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Fendi unveils suspended walkway over Rome’s Trevi fountain

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

ROME (AFP) – Fashion house Fendi kicked off the restoration of Rome’s famed Trevi Fountain Monday, unveiling a transparent suspended walkway which will give tourists a whole new vantage point of the historic monument.

Though the fountain has been drained for the renovation, a small basin has been set up at the rim so that visitors can continue the tradition of throwing a coin into the waters with their back turned — a custom which is said to bring good luck.

“The restoration works are invasive and will be disruptive for the thousands of tourists who come every day, but we thought the walkway would be the best way to show off the fountain,” Fendi’s CEO Pietro Beccari told AFP.

The plexiglass bridge “is a way to show people the fountain from a position no one has been in before,” he said.

While much of the elaborate Baroque facade is now hidden under scaffolding, tourists crossing the basin on the walkway will be able to get a close look at the restoration as it takes place.

The 2.18 million euro ($2.98 million) repairs on the nearly 300-year-old fountain will take 18 months, Beccari said.

While some tourists said they were curious to try out the bridge, others complained about finding one of the most iconic monuments in Italy under wraps.

“We were very surprised because we thought we were just going to throw a penny in the fountain. But I’m kind of excited to see what is going on here,” said American tourist Pat, while Coco from Hong Kong said he was “really quite disappointed” to find the basin empty of water.

There had been concern about the state of the Trevi Fountain, which is visited by millions of tourists every year, particularly after bits of its elaborate cornice began falling off in 2012 following a particularly harsh winter.

“Patronage is essential in maintaining and restoring our marvelous works of architecture, archaeology and art,” Rome’s mayor Ignazio Marino said, as he chucked a coin over his shoulder into the temporary basin.

Fendi, founded as a leather goods business in Rome in the 1920s and now part of French luxury giant LVMH, will also be funding the restoration of the Quattro Fontane, late Renaissance fountains which grace each corner of a busy intersection in the capital.

It is not the only fashion house to fund the renovation of the eternal city’s monuments: luxury jeweler Bulgari announced earlier this year that it would help clean up the city’s famous Spanish Steps, while shoemaker Tod’s is financing works at the Colosseum.

Under the deal with Rome city authorities, Fendi’s logo can be displayed on building site signs during the repairs and the company can hang a plaque near the monuments for four years after completion.

The Trevi Fountain, commissioned by Pope Clement XII in 1730, is the end point of one of the aqueducts that supplied ancient Rome with water.

It famously featured in a scene of Federico Fellini’s iconic film “La Dolce Vita” in which Marcello Mastroianni and co-star Anita Ekberg share a kiss while wading through its pristine waters.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Trevi Fountain in Rome. May 2007 photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising 'Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Expert relates little-known history of breweries in Joliet, Ill.

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising 'Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising ‘Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

JOLIET, Ill. — Like many people in a 1970s, John Bittermann of Joliet collected splash cans.

But when a crony offering Bittermann a mop that a Fred Sehring Brewing Company in Joliet expelled in 1906, a dumbfounded Bittermann asked, “There were breweries in Joliet?”

Bittermann afterwards embarked on a decades-long mindfulness with Joliet’s brewery history, one that has constructed an endless collection of beer-related outfit and a extensive demeanour during an attention that helped figure Joliet, as good as a whole country, he said.

“Everyone can describe to beer. Unlike wine, it’s a common man’s drink, a operative man’s drink,” Bittermann said. “Adams was a brewer; Washington was a brewer; Jefferson was a brewer. It goes behind to a Mayflower; we can demeanour it adult – ‘our spread being many spent, generally a beere.’ The Pilgrims headed toward a seashore given they were out of food and beer.”

On Jul 17, Bittermann will conduct a presentation at the Joliet Area Historical Museum on “The Architectural History of Joliet Brewery Buildings.” Bittermann will plead a layouts and skeleton of a brewery buildings; a expansion of a brewery buildings via a years; when a breweries were built, by who, and during what cost; what happened to a brewery buildings after they closed; and what exists during a locations today.

Why was beer so appealing to Joliet residents of a 19th and early 20th? Generally fascinating as a beverage, it was also used to forestall disease and cholera, consequences of infested water, Bittermann said.

“It was served during cooking to children,” Bittermann said. “People had complicated stouts during breakfast to uphold them. Nursing mothers were speedy to splash it. Breweries were among a initial industries to be set up, not only in Joliet, though in a nation. Just about any place we had H2O and could grow grain, we could make beer.”

And in Joliet, people did. Porter’s ale, stouts and porters were favored by the Irish, Bittermann said, while Joliet’s German and Slavic populations were fans of Fred Sehring beer. Prohibition was indeed profitable to Joliet breweries.

“We were only distant adequate of out Chicago to be ignored,” Bittermann said, “but not so distant that we could send things and not be noticed.”

Most of Bittermann’s information about Joliet’s brewing story came from aged internal newspapers archived during a Joliet Public Library, he said.

“I would go there any Monday night for 3 to 4 hours, only scrolling by microfilm,” Bittermann said. “I have review by 70 percent of them.”

An 1862 announcement for Porter Ale promotes a thought that his batch ale – delivered in two, 3 and 5 gallon demijohns – is specifically for family use and guaranteed to be kept “fresh and nice.”

In a second announcement – from Aug. 30, 1862 – Porter betrothed to compensate a top cost for primary barley delivered to his Bluff Street Brewery. One poser brewer, famous as G. Simpson Phoenix, has no residence solely a Joliet P.O. box, Bittermann said.

Yet, Bittermann deduced, that association advertised home smoothness in a Joliet newspaper, so it apparently was a Joliet brewery. In a days before refrigeration and pasteurization, splash was a rarely perishable product, so many brewers were located within a few blocks of their business and delivered their splash uninformed any day, he said.

“All we know is a name, a P.O. box and a fact he done deliveries in Joliet,” Bittermann said. “The rest is mislaid to time.”

Like many of today’s businesses, Joliet brewers promoted their business by giveaway merchandise. Bittermann’s Joliet brewery collection is full with these items: mugs, eyeglasses with etched logos, calendars, signs, tappers, cigar cutters, change purses, matchboxes with grooves for distinguished matches, and timber cases that hold both pencils and combs. Bittermann also collects splash barrels, timber boxes for shipping beer.

“They’re cool, aged pieces that paint a time and an attention that is prolonged given gone,” Bittermann said.

When celebration beer, Bittermann prefers heavy, dim beer. With a assistance of friends, Bittermann has done splash as a home brewer. He attends beer-related uncover and events, as good as beer-tasting festivals.

Bittermann pronounced a vendors he meets during those events are a friendliest people in a world, peaceful to speak to anybody, anytime. Of course, Bittermann mostly is one of those vendors.

“I move things to sell,” Bittermann pronounced with a smile, “so we have income to buy some-more stuff.”

Source: The (Joliet) Herald-News

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising 'Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising ‘Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising 'Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Expert relates little-known history of breweries in Joliet, Ill.

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising 'Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising ‘Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

JOLIET, Ill. — Like many people in a 1970s, John Bittermann of Joliet collected splash cans.

But when a crony offering Bittermann a mop that a Fred Sehring Brewing Company in Joliet expelled in 1906, a dumbfounded Bittermann asked, “There were breweries in Joliet?”

Bittermann afterwards embarked on a decades-long mindfulness with Joliet’s brewery history, one that has constructed an endless collection of beer-related outfit and a extensive demeanour during an attention that helped figure Joliet, as good as a whole country, he said.

“Everyone can describe to beer. Unlike wine, it’s a common man’s drink, a operative man’s drink,” Bittermann said. “Adams was a brewer; Washington was a brewer; Jefferson was a brewer. It goes behind to a Mayflower; we can demeanour it adult – ‘our spread being many spent, generally a beere.’ The Pilgrims headed toward a seashore given they were out of food and beer.”

On Jul 17, Bittermann will conduct a presentation at the Joliet Area Historical Museum on “The Architectural History of Joliet Brewery Buildings.” Bittermann will plead a layouts and skeleton of a brewery buildings; a expansion of a brewery buildings via a years; when a breweries were built, by who, and during what cost; what happened to a brewery buildings after they closed; and what exists during a locations today.

Why was beer so appealing to Joliet residents of a 19th and early 20th? Generally fascinating as a beverage, it was also used to forestall disease and cholera, consequences of infested water, Bittermann said.

“It was served during cooking to children,” Bittermann said. “People had complicated stouts during breakfast to uphold them. Nursing mothers were speedy to splash it. Breweries were among a initial industries to be set up, not only in Joliet, though in a nation. Just about any place we had H2O and could grow grain, we could make beer.”

And in Joliet, people did. Porter’s ale, stouts and porters were favored by the Irish, Bittermann said, while Joliet’s German and Slavic populations were fans of Fred Sehring beer. Prohibition was indeed profitable to Joliet breweries.

“We were only distant adequate of out Chicago to be ignored,” Bittermann said, “but not so distant that we could send things and not be noticed.”

Most of Bittermann’s information about Joliet’s brewing story came from aged internal newspapers archived during a Joliet Public Library, he said.

“I would go there any Monday night for 3 to 4 hours, only scrolling by microfilm,” Bittermann said. “I have review by 70 percent of them.”

An 1862 announcement for Porter Ale promotes a thought that his batch ale – delivered in two, 3 and 5 gallon demijohns – is specifically for family use and guaranteed to be kept “fresh and nice.”

In a second announcement – from Aug. 30, 1862 – Porter betrothed to compensate a top cost for primary barley delivered to his Bluff Street Brewery. One poser brewer, famous as G. Simpson Phoenix, has no residence solely a Joliet P.O. box, Bittermann said.

Yet, Bittermann deduced, that association advertised home smoothness in a Joliet newspaper, so it apparently was a Joliet brewery. In a days before refrigeration and pasteurization, splash was a rarely perishable product, so many brewers were located within a few blocks of their business and delivered their splash uninformed any day, he said.

“All we know is a name, a P.O. box and a fact he done deliveries in Joliet,” Bittermann said. “The rest is mislaid to time.”

Like many of today’s businesses, Joliet brewers promoted their business by giveaway merchandise. Bittermann’s Joliet brewery collection is full with these items: mugs, eyeglasses with etched logos, calendars, signs, tappers, cigar cutters, change purses, matchboxes with grooves for distinguished matches, and timber cases that hold both pencils and combs. Bittermann also collects splash barrels, timber boxes for shipping beer.

“They’re cool, aged pieces that paint a time and an attention that is prolonged given gone,” Bittermann said.

When celebration beer, Bittermann prefers heavy, dim beer. With a assistance of friends, Bittermann has done splash as a home brewer. He attends beer-related uncover and events, as good as beer-tasting festivals.

Bittermann pronounced a vendors he meets during those events are a friendliest people in a world, peaceful to speak to anybody, anytime. Of course, Bittermann mostly is one of those vendors.

“I move things to sell,” Bittermann pronounced with a smile, “so we have income to buy some-more stuff.”

Source: The (Joliet) Herald-News

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising 'Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Serving tray for Fred Sehring Brewing Co., Joliet, Ill., advertising ‘Standard Pale and Muenchener bottle Beer.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Victorian Casino Antiques

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Transportation museum builds Frank Lloyd Wright gas station

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

BUFFALO, New York (AP) – Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1927 vision of a proper gas station had two fireplaces, a second-floor observation room, eye-catching copper spires and separate restrooms for the comfort of travelers increasingly hitting the road rather than rails.

The architect never saw his idea leave the drawing board after demanding an architectural fee equal to the cost of building it.

But on Friday, the Buffalo Transportation/Pierce-Arrow Museum cut the ribbon on the Wright-designed station it built from the plans, with Wright’s own convertible parked out front.

“In 1927, you had a gas pump and an outhouse,” museum founder James Sandoro said, contrasting the filling stations of the times with the luxury version Wright designed for a nearby Buffalo intersection.

The non-working station was built inside an addition to the museum to protect it and its visitors from the elements.

In his writings, Wright called his station “an ornament to the pavement,” said Sandoro, who acquired the rights to build it 11 years ago from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation in Arizona.

Eventually, Wright would design and help build one working gas station, in Minnesota. The station, opened in 1958 with a glass-walled observation lounge and copper canopy similar to what Wright envisioned 30 years earlier, remains open today.

Wright died in 1959.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Transportation museum builds Frank Lloyd Wright gas station

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

BUFFALO, New York (AP) – Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1927 vision of a proper gas station had two fireplaces, a second-floor observation room, eye-catching copper spires and separate restrooms for the comfort of travelers increasingly hitting the road rather than rails.

The architect never saw his idea leave the drawing board after demanding an architectural fee equal to the cost of building it.

But on Friday, the Buffalo Transportation/Pierce-Arrow Museum cut the ribbon on the Wright-designed station it built from the plans, with Wright’s own convertible parked out front.

“In 1927, you had a gas pump and an outhouse,” museum founder James Sandoro said, contrasting the filling stations of the times with the luxury version Wright designed for a nearby Buffalo intersection.

The non-working station was built inside an addition to the museum to protect it and its visitors from the elements.

In his writings, Wright called his station “an ornament to the pavement,” said Sandoro, who acquired the rights to build it 11 years ago from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation in Arizona.

Eventually, Wright would design and help build one working gas station, in Minnesota. The station, opened in 1958 with a glass-walled observation lounge and copper canopy similar to what Wright envisioned 30 years earlier, remains open today.

Wright died in 1959.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lindholm Oil Company service station located at 202 Cloquet Ave., in Cloquet, Minnesota. It was built in 1958 and is still in use. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Library of Congress Image