Amy Herman will present 'The Art of Perception' on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center.

Rago’s ‘Art of Perception’ talk to benefit K9s, inmates program

Amy Herman will present 'The Art of Perception' on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center.

Amy Herman will present ‘The Art of Perception’ on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center.

LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – Rago Arts & Auction Center invites the public to a hear a talk by Amy Herman titled “The Art of Perception,” which will be presented Tuesday, July 15.

Amy Herman holds a B.A. in International Affairs from Lafayette College, a J.D. from the National Law Center, George Washington University, and an M.A. in art history from Hunter College. While working at The Frick Collection, she instituted an interactive program/class using art to help medical students improve their observation skills. After expanding the medical program to seven medical schools in New York, Herman adapted the program for law enforcement professionals across a wide range of agencies including the New York City Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Justice and the Secret Service. She calls the program she developed “The Art of Perception.”

Miriam Tucker, managing partner of Rago Arts & Auction Center, attended Herman’s presentation of “The Art of Perception” last November at the national conference of the Appraisers Association of America and found it equally entertaining and instructive.

“You’ll learn a lot about your ability to observe … or lack thereof,” says Tucker.

Herman’s talk will be given at Rago Auctions, 333 N. Main St. in Lambertville. A social hour will begin at 5:30 p.m. followed by “The Art of Perception” from 6:30-8 p.m.

The suggested donation is $100 per person.

Proceeds will benefit the Puppies Behind Bars, a 501(c)3 organization. Puppies Behind Bars trains prison inmates to raise service dogs for wounded war veterans and explosive-detection dogs for law enforcement, then places them free of charge. The puppies live in prison with their inmate raisers from the age of eight weeks to 24 months. The dogs transform the lives of the inmates who train them and the lives of those they go on to serve. For more information visit puppiesbehindbars.com .

RSVP to raac@ragoarts.com or 609-397-9374 ext. 119.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Amy Herman will present 'The Art of Perception' on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center.

Amy Herman will present ‘The Art of Perception’ on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center.

NASA portrait of astronaut Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Bunker Hill air base marks 60th year with calls for memories

NASA portrait of astronaut Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NASA portrait of astronaut Virgil I. ‘Gus’ Grissom. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

PERU, Ind. (AP) – It’s difficult to fit 60 years of history into a single building, but Jim Price is determined to make the Grissom Air Museum entirely for the people who have shaped it over the years.

That is why Price, the museum’s executive director, is hoping the community will respond by submitting their own photos and memories of the Bunker Hill Air Force Base, which is embedded in nearly every part of the culture of Bunker Hill.

To keep the museum fresh and exciting for those who frequent it, he said, there must be an effort to reach out to them to tell the stories behind the people that made it what it is today.

“The only way we’ll ever do this job well is to include everybody that had a business or family here,” he told the Kokomo Tribune. “That group is our family that we need to build relationships with, so that we can become more of an owner-operated business. We’ve got to be more shareholder-driven. It’s all about what do you want us to do and how do we tell that story?”

On Sunday, people traveled from across the state to share those stories and celebrate the 60th anniversary of the opening of the Bunker Hill Air Force Base, which is now known as the Grissom Air Reserve Base.

Air Force veterans, military enthusiasts and those who had personal connections with the base stopped in to share memories about the facility with a reception at the Grissom Air Museum.

Earl Simon, who was stationed at Grissom following basic training and tech school in Denver, Colo,, said the base still brings to life many good memories as a native of South Bend.

“That was my first station that I was assigned to,” he said. “Those were really great days for me, because I lived close to home. When I was off duty, I could go home on the weekends, so that was really neat.”

Reg Wagle, who recently retired from the Air Force after serving for 22 years, said Grissom was constantly a source of inspiration for him as a kid growing up in Mishawaka, Ind.

Wagle, who later became a fighter crew chief in the Air Force, said he used to watch planes take off from Grissom during hot days in the summer as a child and dream about someday working on them.

“I used to work on A-10s and seeing them out here was awe-inspiring,” he said. “I remember driving by before the (A-10s) got here and those were (Cessna) A-37 Dragonflies. I got to see A-10s and thought it would be neat to see those every day. Then for 22 years, I did see them every day.”

Wagle said coming to Grissom has always been a treat because of his passion for learning and examining military history.

“Military history is always something that I’ve been interested in,” he said. “It’s neat to learn and read about this stuff and I can’t stop talking about it when I’m with my parents.”

From the time it opened as the Bunker Hill Naval Air Station in 1942 until it transitioned through realignment to the Grissom Reserve Air Force Base in 1994, volunteer and 40-year Air Force veteran John Ensign said the base has seen many changes.

“I saw a lot of changes here at the base,” he said. “The biggest change, I think, since I’m now out and looking has been the rebuilt base for the reserves and the changes that have come over there.”

The site reopened as an Air Force base June 22, 1954, as the 4433rd Air Base Squadron and the 323rd Fighter-Bomber Wing called Bunker Hill Air Force Base home.

The base was renamed on May 12, 1968, after Lt. Col. Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom, a native of Mitchell, Ind., who was one of the original seven astronauts. Grissom was killed during a fire in his Apollo capsule while still on the launching pad at Cape Kennedy, Fla.

In 1978, a second Air Force Reserve unit joined the scene. At the height of its operations, the base was home to one active duty wing and two Air Force Reserve units. Due to changes in the Air Force mission, two units (one reserve, one active duty) were deactivated in 1994.

Grissom was realigned as an Air Force Reserve facility. Today it is home to the 434th Air Refueling Wing and is one of only four Air Reserve Command Bases in the nation.

That’s a short history of the base, but Price wants the history of the base to come alive through the people.

“We’re not the Smithsonian, so we don’t have tunnels underneath here for storage,” he said. “I think people will be pleased by the fact that you’re going to rotate displays. I think everybody is going to have that opportunity, but you can’t have everybody’s personal stuff in here. But I think you can find ways to incorporate it into here.”

If you have stories, photos or memorabilia you would like to share related to the air base, contact Price at 574-398-1451.

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Information from: Kokomo Tribune, http://www.ktonline.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-23-14 1435GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


NASA portrait of astronaut Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NASA portrait of astronaut Virgil I. ‘Gus’ Grissom. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

A first edition of 'Gone With the Wind.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive.

Author’s letters shed light on ‘Gone with the Wind’ outcome

A first edition of 'Gone With the Wind.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive.

A first edition of ‘Gone With the Wind.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive.

WASHINGTON (AFP) – It’s not that Margaret Mitchell didn’t give a damn whether Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler would ever get back together again in Gone with the Wind.

She simply didn’t know, according to letters to fans from the celebrated 20th century American novelist that have come up for auction in the United States this week.

“About the ending of the book and whether or not Rhett came back to his wife – well, you have me out on a limb,” wrote Mitchell five months after her best-seller was published in 1936.

“You see, I do not know myself. I honestly never thought about what happened to the characters after the book ended,” she explained.

“You asked if I planned this to be a book when I began it,” added Mitchell.

“Yes, I had every detail in my head before I set a single word on paper.”

The single-page, signed letters from November 1936 through August 1938 give insight into the creative process that resulted in one of American literature’s best-known books – and one of Hollywood’s greatest screen hits.

Massachusetts-based RR Auctions listed the correspondence as part of its latest online auction of Hollywood memorabilia that ends Thursday. On Monday, bidding had surpassed $3,300.

The lot also includes an informational booklet about Mitchell and her book, with a notation in her hand on the front cover, and a scrapbook “meticulously compiled” by an admirer.

Former journalist Mitchell was in her mid-20s when she started writing the Civil War epic that won her a Pulitzer fiction prize as well as a National Book Award.

She died in 1949 when she was fatally struck by a car in downtown Atlanta, Ga., on her way to the movies. She was 48.

 

 

Signed Georgia O'Keeffe 'Black Place III' offset lithograph, an original exhibition poster for the Santa Fe Music Festival. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rare Posters.

Artists want to protect Georgia O’Keeffe’s ‘Black Place’

Signed Georgia O'Keeffe 'Black Place III' offset lithograph, an original exhibition poster for the Santa Fe Music Festival. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rare Posters.

Signed Georgia O’Keeffe ‘Black Place III’ offset lithograph, an original exhibition poster for the Santa Fe Music Festival. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rare Posters.

NAGEEZI, N.M. (AP) – There is a concern on the part of some artists and environmentalists that oil and gas drilling is encroaching on the black, white and gray hills in northwestern New Mexico made famous in Georgia O’Keeffe’s drawings and paintings.

While the “Black Place” itself remains untouched, The New Mexican newspaper reports that there dozens of drilling tanks 500 yards from the site and it’s surrounded by rigs and a maze of dusty dirt roads traveled by oilfield workers.

The head of the O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, Robert Kret, says he had a preliminary discussion with state preservation officials and another meeting is planned. But state officials say it’s too early to say what could be done to protect the Black Place.

The area is located on federal land just east of a Navajo community.

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Information from: The Santa Fe New Mexican, http://www.sfnewmexican.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-22-14 1813GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Signed Georgia O'Keeffe 'Black Place III' offset lithograph, an original exhibition poster for the Santa Fe Music Festival. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rare Posters.

Signed Georgia O’Keeffe ‘Black Place III’ offset lithograph, an original exhibition poster for the Santa Fe Music Festival. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rare Posters.

One of the most popular pieces in the National Palace Museum collection is the 'Jadeite Cabbage'. Image by peellden. This file is licensed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Taiwan art exhibit in Japan salvaged by name fix, apology

One of the most popular pieces in the National Palace Museum collection is the 'Jadeite Cabbage'. Image by peellden. This file is licensed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

One of the most popular pieces in the National Palace Museum collection is the ‘Jadeite Cabbage’. Image by peellden. This file is licensed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

TOKYO (AP) – An exhibition of Chinese art from Taiwan has opened as planned after the Tokyo National Museum revised promotional materials that had omitted the word “National” from references to Taipei’s National Palace Museum.

Taiwan is sensitive to how other governments portray it, and last week its first lady, Christine Chou, canceled a trip to Tokyo for the exhibition.

But on Monday, the Taiwanese museum’s director accepted an apology from the Tokyo museum’s curator at an opening ceremony for the exhibition, whose centerpiece is a lustrous white and green cabbage carved of jadeite.

“I believe this will suffice to restore the positive sentiment toward Japan among the Taiwan people,” said the Taiwan museum’s director, Feng Ming-chu. She said the past two or three days had been “regrettable,” but added that once the problem with the name was fixed the exhibition could proceed.

“The most important thing is trust, sincerity and mutual respect,” she said.

The National Palace Museum houses many treasures taken to Taiwan when the Nationalists fled there from mainland China during a civil war in 1949. China still claims Taiwan as its own territory.

Japan formally recognizes mainland China but also has close ties with Taiwan, which has full diplomatic relations with only 23 countries, most of them in Latin America, Africa, and the south Pacific.

“The upcoming exhibition in Japan of some of Taiwan’s most treasured collections of antiques would have been a perfect example of cultural exchange if not for a row over the name of the Taipei-based museum that owns the items,” the Taiwan newspaper The China Post said in an editorial.

It noted that the word “national” in the Taipei museum’s name indicates it is a government-run museum.

“We are disappointed at the Tokyo museum,” it said.

Staff at the Tokyo museum would not give a reason for the original incorrect references in the posters for the exhibit.

Masami Zeniya, executive director of the Tokyo museum, acknowledged having “upset” the Taiwanese with the misnaming. “We take this matter very seriously and made the corrections immediately,” he said. “We would like to apologize for causing trouble.”

The exhibition opens to the public on Tuesday. The jadeite cabbage will return to Taiwan in two weeks, as planned, but 200 other items will be on display until the exhibition moves in September to the Kyushu National Museum on the island of Kyushu.

___

Associated Press writers Miki Toda and Koji Ueda contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-23-14 0935GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


One of the most popular pieces in the National Palace Museum collection is the 'Jadeite Cabbage'. Image by peellden. This file is licensed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

One of the most popular pieces in the National Palace Museum collection is the ‘Jadeite Cabbage’. Image by peellden. This file is licensed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Clayton Moore, famed for his TV depiction of The Lone Ranger, wore this outfit to public appearances after his retirement from the TV role that brought him fame. The outfit sold to a Texas bidder for $195,000 at A & S Auctions on July 12, 2014. Image courtesy of A & S Auctions

Hi-yo, Silver! Clayton Moore’s Lone Ranger outfit heads to auction

The Lone Ranger outfit that Clayton Moore wore to public appearances after retiring from his acting career. A & S Auctions image

The Lone Ranger outfit that Clayton Moore wore to public appearances after retiring from his acting career. A & S Auctions image

WACO, Texas – “From out of the west with the speed of light and a hearty ‘Hi-yo, Silver!” was a phrase that captivated youngsters of the 1950s and could spur them into furious action. Each week, those words were the verbal cue for kids to adjust the rabbit ears, huddle in front of the family TV and wait anxiously for the next big adventure starring their favorite hero on horseback, The Lone Ranger.

Since The Lone Ranger’s radio introduction to American audiences in 1933, many actors have voiced or played the lead role, across various media. None, however, captured the public’s imagination quite like Clayton Moore, who portrayed the masked lawman of the Old West on the ABC-TV series The Lone Ranger, which ran from 1949 through 1957.

For many years after retiring from television, Moore made public appearances “in character” as The Lone Ranger. He was a striking figure in his powder-blue shirt and pants, red kerchief and Stetson hat. The outfit – designed by the famed Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors of North Hollywood, California – came to life with the addition of black Nudie’s cowboy boots, a hand-tooled and studded buscadero gun rig made by Hollywood’s “silversmith to the stars” Edward H. Bohlin; and custom-made Colt pistols factory-engraved with the serial numbers “LR-1” and “LR-2,” and “Clayton Moore – The Lone Ranger.” The guns are accompanied by an original Colt factory letter certifying they were a special order made specifically for Clayton Moore.

Moore passed away in 1999, but a head-turning Lone Ranger costume he wore to countless state fairs, parades and even mall openings, is back in the spotlight. After more than a decade in the private collection of Texas businessman the late Bob Davis, the outfit will be offered to bidders in four separate lots on July 12th at A & S Auction Co., in Waco, Texas.

In a method known as “sold on the whole bid,” each of the four lots will be hammered individually and in consecutive order. Then, the auctioneer will reopen bidding for the entire outfit with a starting bid that equals the total of the four previous “winning” bids plus 10 percent.

“If there are no bids at that point, then each of the four individual lots will be considered sold to the four bidders for whatever the hammer prices were. Otherwise, the bidding will continue in normal auction fashion for the whole kit and caboodle. It’s a way of enabling the outfit to remain intact, if possible,” said Scott Franks, owner and auctioneer at A & S Auction.

Visit www.asauctions.com for additional information. Tel. 254-799-6004.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


The Lone Ranger outfit that Clayton Moore wore to public appearances after retiring from his acting career. A & S Auctions image

The Lone Ranger outfit that Clayton Moore wore to public appearances after retiring from his acting career. A & S Auctions image

The inside liner of the ornately hand-tooled leather gun belt is marked ‘Bohlin’ in four places and bears an inscription to Clayton Moore from Bohlin’s then-owner Danny Lang Jr and Moore’s good friend Jim Hoiby. A & S Auctions image

The inside liner of the ornately hand-tooled leather gun belt is marked ‘Bohlin’ in four places and bears an inscription to Clayton Moore from Bohlin’s then-owner Danny Lang Jr and Moore’s good friend Jim Hoiby. A & S Auctions image

One of a pair of Colt single-action revolvers made especially for Clayton Moore/The Lone Ranger, shown in its holster. The hand-tooled black leather buscadero gun rig was made by Hollywood’s ‘silversmith to the stars,’ Edward H. Bohlin. A & S Auctions image

One of a pair of Colt single-action revolvers made especially for Clayton Moore/The Lone Ranger, shown in its holster. The hand-tooled black leather buscadero gun rig was made by Hollywood’s ‘silversmith to the stars,’ Edward H. Bohlin. A & S Auctions image

Closeup of ‘silver’ bullets in cartridge loops, each impressed with the words: ‘Lone Ranger 45.’ A & S Auctions image

Closeup of ‘silver’ bullets in cartridge loops, each impressed with the words: ‘Lone Ranger 45.’ A & S Auctions image

Engraved on the back strap on both of the Colt gun handles is the personalization: ‘Clayton Moore The Lone Ranger.’ A & S Auctions image

Engraved on the back strap on both of the Colt gun handles is the personalization: ‘Clayton Moore The Lone Ranger.’ A & S Auctions image

The Lone Ranger guns are engraved with the distinctive factory-engraved Colt serial numbers ‘LR-1’ and ‘LR-2,’ offered with an original Colt factory letter showing them as a special order for Clayton Moore. A & S Auctions image

The Lone Ranger guns are engraved with the distinctive factory-engraved Colt serial numbers ‘LR-1’ and ‘LR-2,’ offered with an original Colt factory letter showing them as a special order for Clayton Moore. A & S Auctions image

 

Art Smith, 'Patina' Necklace, circa 1959, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.2.

Art Smith modernist jewelry on display at Dallas museum

Art Smith, 'Patina' Necklace, circa 1959, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.2.

Art Smith, ‘Patina’ Necklace, circa 1959, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.2.

DALLAS – “From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith,” at the Dallas Museum of Art through Dec. 7, examines the work of jewelry maker Arthur Smith (1917-1982) through a collection acquired by the Brooklyn Museum of Art from the estate of the artist.

One of the leading modernist jewelers of the mid-20th century, Smith was inspired by surrealism, biomorphism and primitivism, and a deep awareness of the female form. As a result, his jewelry is dynamic in its size and shape, but remains lightweight and wearable.

The exhibition features 26 pieces including silver and gold jewelry created by the celebrated African American artist, and more than 30 pieces by his contemporaries, including Frank Rebajes, Else Freund, Marion Anderson Noyes and Ed Wiener. Archival material from Smith’s estate—sketches, the original shop sign and period photographs of models wearing the jewelry—enhances the presentation. The jewelry, dating from the late 1940s to the 1970s, includes his most famous pieces: the “Lava” bracelet, or cuff, which extends over the entire lower arm in undulating and overlapping forms; the “Patina” necklace, inspired by the mobiles of Alexander Calder; and a massive ring with three semi-precious stones that stretches over three fingers. Accompanying the exhibition will be a presentation of Smith’s tools in the museum’s Center for Creative Connections on Level 1.

In 1946 Art Smith opened his jewelry studio in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village. He soon caught the attention of buyers in Boston, San Francisco and Chicago. In the early 1950s, magazine coverage of his designs in Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue led to his establishing business relationships with boutiques and department stores nationwide. One of those was the Black Tulip in Dallas.

“Art Smith’s boldly wrought jewelry captures the spirit of progressive design in the mid-20th century by transforming precious and common metals into wearable sculpture. Artists, notably Alexander Calder, provided inspiration for a generation of designers, but Smith’s creations reflect an especially rich and perceptive approach to the iconography of modernism, the handmade object and the human form,” said Kevin W. Tucker, senior curator of Decorative Arts and Design at the Dallas Museum of Art.

While Smith’s early work was executed primarily in copper and brass, for affordability, his growing recognition led to special commissions for custom design, and the production of more work in silver. He received a prestigious commission from the Peekskill, N.Y., chapter of the NAACP to design a brooch for Eleanor Roosevelt, and was commissioned to design a pair of cufflinks for Duke Ellington, whose music he often listened to while working. Smith was an active supporter of black and gay civil rights, an avid jazz enthusiast, and a patron of black modern dance groups. It was his keen interest in the latter that influenced his mature work and is reflected in its grander scale.

“From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith” is organized by the Brooklyn Museum.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Art Smith, 'Patina' Necklace, circa 1959, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.2.

Art Smith, ‘Patina’ Necklace, circa 1959, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.2.

Art Smith, 'Lava' Bracelet, designed circa 1946, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.16.

Art Smith, ‘Lava’ Bracelet, designed circa 1946, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.16.

Art Smith, 'Modern Cuff' Bracelet, designed circa 1948, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.15.

Art Smith, ‘Modern Cuff’ Bracelet, designed circa 1948, silver, Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Charles L. Russell, 2007.61.15.

This group of six sailors' woolwork pictures, each in its original maple frame, was discovered during a house call to an old forester's cabin in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. They were sold by Mitchells auctioneers in Cockermouth.

Miscellaneana: Pictures without paint

This group of six sailors' woolwork pictures, each in its original maple frame, was discovered during a house call to an old forester's cabin in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. They were sold by Mitchells auctioneers in Cockermouth.

This group of six sailors’ woolwork pictures, each in its original maple frame, was discovered during a house call to an old forester’s cabin in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. They were sold by Mitchells auctioneers in Cockermouth.

LONDON – It was a monthly, village-hall auction and we were there on the off chance of picking up a bargain. You know the kind of sale I mean: the auctioneer rents the room on the Friday and all the local dealers take along their junk for the sale the following day. It’s where we caught the collecting bug and where we made some of our best buys.

In the end, it looked like being a blank day and all we finished up buying was a handful of old pictures, useful only for the frames. Or so we thought. There was just one picture that stood out from the rest. It was an embroidery of a sailing ship done in a naive, rough-and-ready but nevertheless clever fashion that transpired to be the work of a 12-year-old boy.

How can you possibly know that? I hear you ask. Simple. The picture needed reframing. When we removed it from its original frame, there on the back was the following inscription written in black ink: “Worked by Algernon R. Baker, aged 12 years. In loving memory from Muzzer.”

Who Muzzer was is anyone’s guess. But mine is that Algernon was a young midshipman who worked the embroidery to while away the hours during a long voyage. Too romantic perhaps, but the embroidery has pride of place in our small collection of pictures without paint. Its cost is hard to say, but we paid £6 for the job lot of frames. Its value to us is immeasurable.

The only other sailor’s woolwork picture we own was altogether more expensive. I spotted it in an online auction, and couldn’t resist having a go. It shows a pilot boat leading a clipper in full sail past a headland with a lighthouse on it — clearly a tricky place for shipping — still in its original frame and in perfect condition. If memory serves, it cost something north of £300 but it’s 10 times the size of Algernon’s effort, although the stitching technique is identical.

None of the so-called pictures without paint is more inventive or fascinating than those made by sailors, who must surely have been subjected to the mind-numbing boredom whiling away the hours on the dog watch. What better way to pass the time than by embroidering a picture of the ship on which you serve?

In fact, some pictures were done in such accurate detail, it is often possible to date and even identify the vessels concerned. Naturally, this has a dramatic affect on values, potentially doubling those of the best.

The pictures are quite obviously the work of a male hand. Usually they were embroidered on sailcloth or some other coarse material stretched over a frame knocked together from any wood that happened to be available. Wool was the most commonly used for the pictures, in a crude longstitch, although in rare examples, cotton and linen are seen.

Highly detailed rigging is another feature, usually in spidery black or brown thread. The same thread is sometimes used to work dates and names into the pictures.

The ship pictures were highly popular between about 1840-1880. Nowadays they are a popular addition to sales of naive and primitive antiques and works of art. Prices vary according to size and detail. Earlier examples tend to be the most expensive, while later, less carefully worked pictures lose their quality and appeal. Expect to pay £400-600 for one worth hanging on the wall; £500-800 for a good one and twice, or even three times that for the exceptional.

One of the most esoteric in this area of collecting are sand pictures, which started life centuries ago as ceremonial or ritualistic exercises intended to be transient and temporary. None were more temporary than those created by the German artist Benjamin Zobel (1762-1831) for his employer, the mad King George III.

Zobel, the son of a German confectioner, became a “table decker,” creating pictures of colored sand, marble dust, powdered glass, sugar and even bread crumbs to replace tablecloths at banquets. The work probably made the Bavarian artist mad too. Each day, just a little more insane, the king would view Zobel’s latest masterpieces and then ruffle them up and make him start all over again.

It was enough to start a craze, albeit a brief one. Bored Regency and Victorian ladies spent hours making sand pictures, not on the tops of tables, but on canvas which they framed and hung on the wall. And before you ask, the sand they used was mixed with glue. That way their work didn’t end up on the floor like Zobel’s.

Sand pictures find a ready market when they turn up in the saleroom, as do other pictures without paint, the list of which is extensive. Perhaps the best known is the cut-out paper portrait, the silhouette, so named after the French Controller General of Finances, Ettienne de Silhouette. The term came to mean “a man reduced to his simplest form” which is just what you were when you paid your taxes.

Other types of paper pictures include elaborate and intricate cut-out designs, not unlike doilies, that first appeared in about 1840. Cut-outs were favoured by artistic young ladies and gentlemen who produced work of the most amazing delicacy. The less artistic, however, chose to make tinsel pictures, mainly because they took less skill and talent.

Colored and shiny paper was cut to form pictures of fruit, flowers and landscapes in the pastime that first became popular towards the end of the 18th century. It had largely died out by about 1850.

Those lacking the ability to create their own pictures probably spent their spare time with one of the many kits available to produce pinprick pictures: basically pictures made from holes. Complete instructions and designs were to be found in books and magazines at the height of their popularity from 1820-1840. Pictures were made using a range of different-sized pins and often also involving the cut-out technique. Other pictures that never saw an artist’s brush were fashioned from all manner of raw materials: seaweed, cork, wax, even human hair.

The First World War was another opportunity for men to try their hands at sewing and embroidery. Traditionally, soldiers had always dabbled with embroidering their regimental badges on to handkerchiefs to send home to sweethearts and the 1914-18 war saw the habit grow into an art form.

Often quite large pictures contained a photograph of the soldier, surrounded by flags of the Allies, laurel leaves, poppies and patriotic inscriptions. The good ones, worked in colored silks, can only appreciate in value, but don’t be fooled by manufactured versions that soldiers who were all thumbs purchased to send home to their loved ones.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


This group of six sailors' woolwork pictures, each in its original maple frame, was discovered during a house call to an old forester's cabin in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. They were sold by Mitchells auctioneers in Cockermouth.

This group of six sailors’ woolwork pictures, each in its original maple frame, was discovered during a house call to an old forester’s cabin in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. They were sold by Mitchells auctioneers in Cockermouth.

A 19th century handworked sailor's woolwork, a three-masted vessel with variety of flags and with smaller two-masted vessel to front. 17 in x 26 in, in maple frame, circa 1860. Sold for £650

A 19th century handworked sailor’s woolwork, a three-masted vessel with variety of flags and with smaller two-masted vessel to front. 17 in x 26 in, in maple frame, circa 1860. Sold for £650

A 19th-century handworked sailor's woolwork, HMS Endymion, with crown and Union Jack above and further flags to left and right, signed 'T. Maxted July 1869.' 16 in x 24 in, in gilt slip with maple frame. Sold for £260

A 19th-century handworked sailor’s woolwork, HMS Endymion, with crown and Union Jack above and further flags to left and right, signed ‘T. Maxted July 1869.’ 16 in x 24 in, in gilt slip with maple frame. Sold for £260

A 19th-century handworked sailor's woolwork, three-masted sailing vessel with ensign and gulls behind, circa 1870. 16 in x 23 in, in maple frame. Sold for £750

A 19th-century handworked sailor’s woolwork, three-masted sailing vessel with ensign and gulls behind, circa 1870. 16 in x 23 in, in maple frame. Sold for £750

A 19th-century handworked sailor's woolwork, three-masted sailing vessel in full rig in choppy sea with figures on land to right hand corner, circa 1870. 16 in x 21 in, in maple frame. Sold for £380

A 19th-century handworked sailor’s woolwork, three-masted sailing vessel in full rig in choppy sea with figures on land to right hand corner, circa 1870. 16 in x 21 in, in maple frame. Sold for £380

A 19th-century handworked sailor's woolwork, two vessels in stormy sea. 12 in x 23 in, circa 1870, in maple frame. Sold for £420

A 19th-century handworked sailor’s woolwork, two vessels in stormy sea. 12 in x 23 in, circa 1870, in maple frame. Sold for £420

A 19th-century handworked sailor's woolwork, steam and three-masted sailing vessel 'City of Paris.' 11 in x 16 in, framed, signed 'T. Maxted,' in maple frame. Sold for £520

A 19th-century handworked sailor’s woolwork, steam and three-masted sailing vessel ‘City of Paris.’ 11 in x 16 in, framed, signed ‘T. Maxted,’ in maple frame. Sold for £520

This delightful silhouette by the highly sought-after Francis Torond dates from 1784 and depicts James and Florence Lowther playing cards at their home, Wellwood Manor, in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. Its detail helped it sell for a record £9,400.

This delightful silhouette by the highly sought-after Francis Torond dates from 1784 and depicts James and Florence Lowther playing cards at their home, Wellwood Manor, in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. Its detail helped it sell for a record £9,400.

An early 19th-century sand picture, in the manner of Benjamin Zobel. Sold for £1,125. (Photo: Bonhams)

An early 19th-century sand picture, in the manner of Benjamin Zobel. Sold for £1,125. (Photo: Bonhams)

Fine Northwest Coast Indian basket. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Treasures from around the globe chosen for Jenack sale June 29

Fine Northwest Coast Indian basket. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Fine Northwest Coast Indian basket. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

CHESTER, N.Y. – On Sunday, June 29, William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers will conduct a fine art and antiques auction at the Jenack gallery, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com. The sale will commence at 11 a.m. Eastern

This eclectic sale encompasses African, American Indian, antiquities, ancient coins, Japanese woodblocks, 19th and 20th century furniture, Russian icons and watches.

Leading artwork is an unsigned 18th century portrait of a regal young woman much in the manner of Gainsborough, a painting of an Arab by Augusto Camino, two works by illustrative artist Clark Hulings, one of which is a humorous work with four startled women and the other of a Marilyn Monroe lookalike with red hair. Also to be sold is an oil on canvas by Russian-American artist David Burliuk of two figures in a winter landscape. With recent record prices being paid for his work Jenack is hopeful this work does well also.

In the ethnographic area Jenack will be offering several lots of American Indian including several fine examples of Northwest Coast baskets, Southwest pottery, an Eastern Woodlands mask and a Pacific Northwest mask. African items will include a Senufo maternity figure, a Pangwe mask, a Kaka ancestor figure, a Songye figural comb and a Luluwa figural ceremonial spoon. There will also be many other offerings from this category.

Ancient coins and antiquities will include an Indonesian carved volcanic stone fragment, a fine Indian carved sandstone figure of a deity, a Southeast Asian gray schist carved head of Vishnu, an Egyptian Roman basalt fragment of a lion, a Khmer Baphuon-style sandstone figure of Uma of the Angkor Period (11th century), a Bronze Age pottery wine pitcher and a Neo Babylonian cuneiform clay tablet of Aug. 5, 423 B.C. Coins include Imperial Rome Trajan gold, Baktrian Kingdom Eukratides Tetradachm, Heliokles Tetradachm, Menander Tetradachm, Parthian Kingdom Phraates IV Drachm and many more.

Furniture highlights include a Continental wrought iron base table with copper top and brass studding, a Moorish design low table with tile inset top, a Herman Roggeman welded steel table with glass top and Sheraton mahogany card table.

Rounding out the sale will be a collection of Japanese woodblocks, Sometsuke porcelain, kimonos, watches, rugs, carpets, glass, jewelry, garden statuary, fountain, wrought iron gates and sculpture.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Fine Northwest Coast Indian basket. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Fine Northwest Coast Indian basket. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Philippine Bulul spirit figure. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Philippine Bulul spirit figure. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Java volcanic stone fragment. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Java volcanic stone fragment. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

David Burliuk oil on canvas. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

David Burliuk oil on canvas. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Collection of ancient coins to be sold at the June 29 auction. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Collection of ancient coins to be sold at the June 29 auction. William Jenack Estate Appraisers and Auctioneers image.

Redwood with a large burl in Humboldt Redwoods State Park south of Eureka, California. The park contains the Rockefeller Forest, the world's largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coastal redwoods. Photo by WolfmanSF, Creative Commons by ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Redwood poaching spreads to national forests of Ore., northern Calif.

Redwood with a large burl in Humboldt Redwoods State Park south of Eureka, California. The park contains the Rockefeller Forest, the world's largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coastal redwoods. Photo by WolfmanSF, Creative Commons by ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Redwood with a large burl in Humboldt Redwoods State Park south of Eureka, California. The park contains the Rockefeller Forest, the world’s largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coastal redwoods. Photo by WolfmanSF, Creative Commons by ShareAlike 3.0 License.

GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — The poaching of knobby growths on ancient redwood trees has spread to national forests in northern California and Oregon.

The growths, known as burls, appear at the base of redwood trees, where they send out sprouts. Their intricate grain is prized for furniture and decorations.

The poaching has been a problem in northern California’s Redwood National and State Parks for years. Two men recently were convicted in a case there after rangers tracked slabs cut from a tree by chain saw to a redwood burl shop.

Wendell Wood of the conservation group Oregon Wild says he was out hiking recently and found two redwood trees with burls cut off.

One was along the South Fork of the Smith River on the Six Rivers National Forest near Crescent City, California. The other was along the Winchuck River on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest near Brookings, Oregon, in a stand that represents the northernmost reach of coast redwoods.

“I just casually stumbled into them,” Wood said.

Each scar was about 2 feet square or less, he said. At the Oregon site, the poachers cut down nearby trees so they could turn their vehicle around on the narrow road.

Oregon Wild wants the forests to close old logging roads that poachers drive to reach the remote trees. Besides protecting the trees, it would stop people from dumping garbage on the roads, which are barely passable, even by four-wheel-drive vehicles, Wood said.

He noted that with few rangers to patrol for poachers, the National Park Service imposed a nighttime closure on a road running by the most recent poaching discovery on the park.

“We are not telling the Forest Service how they should best protect it,” Wood said. “But we want them to recognize that the national park is clamping down on this and managing their resources more strategically. This problem has moved into Oregon and onto the national forest. So the forest needs to be looking at it.”

The U.S. Forest Service had no comment on whether it might close roads, but said it is investigating.

“We take damage to natural resources on national forest system lands very seriously and are investigating the theft of the burls,” regional spokesman Tom Knappenberger said in an email. “This potentially is a felony violation.”

A redwood tree can survive a burl being cut off, but the legacy of an organism that could be 1,000 years old is threatened, because the burl is where it sprouts a clone before dying. Sprouting from burls is the prevalent method of redwood propagation.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Redwood with a large burl in Humboldt Redwoods State Park south of Eureka, California. The park contains the Rockefeller Forest, the world's largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coastal redwoods. Photo by WolfmanSF, Creative Commons by ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Redwood with a large burl in Humboldt Redwoods State Park south of Eureka, California. The park contains the Rockefeller Forest, the world’s largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coastal redwoods. Photo by WolfmanSF, Creative Commons by ShareAlike 3.0 License.