Tag Archive for: Charizard

1990s kids are grown-ups now, bidding on childhood faves

A 1999 Pokemon shadowless holographic uncut proof sheet containing seven Charizard cards achieved $234,171 including the buyer’s premium in June 2021. Image courtesy of Hake’s Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

A 1999 Pokemon shadowless holographic uncut proof sheet containing seven Charizard cards achieved $234,171 including the buyer’s premium in June 2021. Image courtesy of Hake’s Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK  — The 1990s was a heady decade: the Internet became available to the public, Nelson Mandela was elected president of South Africa, Prince Charles and Princess Diana divorced and several nations joined forces to wage war in the Persian Gulf. In the realm of pop culture, Nirvana conquered the music charts with their anthem Smells Like Teen SpiritFriends debuted on TV, and the first Harry Potter book was published. Like every decade, the 1990s had its share of now-iconic toys, which ’90s kids — now adults — want to buy back. And that’s why 1990s toys are hot now.

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Marvel Comics’ Fantastic Four #1, est. $15,000-$20,000

Fantastic Four, Pokemon enliven Bruneau’s Sept. 25 auction

Marvel Comics’ Fantastic Four #1, est. $15,000-$20,000

Marvel Comics’ Fantastic Four #1, est. $15,000-$20,000

CRANSTON, R.I. – Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers’ Comic, TCG & Toy auction slated for Saturday, September 25, is shaping up as one of the firm’s best ones yet. It’s bursting with more than 450 lots of Pop Culture treasures, pulled from prominent collections across the United States. Absentee and Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

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Gallery Report: 18th-century redware charger claims $36,900 at Pook & Pook

ATLANTA – At the beginning of every month, ACN columnist Ken Hall delivers top auction highlights from around the United States and the world at large. Here’s his August 2021 edition of Gallery Report. All prices include the buyer’s premium, except where noted.

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Pokemon First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box, $384,000

Pokemon 1999 first-edition booster box is ‘caught’ for $384K

Pokemon First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box, $384,000

Pokemon First-edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box, $384,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

DALLAS – A Pokemon First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box (Wizards of the Coast, 1999) drew 115 bids before it sold for $384,000 to lead Heritage Auctions’ Trading Card Games Auction to $3,473,102 in total sales July 24-25. The event was the first of its kind, and exceeded pre-auction expectations, with perfect sell-through rates of 100% by value and by lots sold, and with 1,445 bidders from around the globe.

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Vintage comic books and Pokemon cards triumph at Bruneau

Marvel Comics Avengers #1 (Sept. 1963), graded CGC 8.0, which sold for $23,125


Marvel Comics Avengers #1 (Sept. 1963), graded CGC 8.0, featuring the debut of the Avengers, which sold for $23,125

CRANSTON, R.I. – A copy of Marvel Comics’ Avengers #1 from September 1963 sold for $23,125, a copy of Marvel Comics’ Amazing Spider-Man #14 from July 1964 brought $17,500, and a first-edition, factory-sealed booster box of Wizards of the Coast Pokemon Gym Challenge from 2000 made $17,500 at a pop culture auction held July 10 by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers.

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Gotta catch ’em all! Collecting Pokemon cards

Charizard, a fire Pokemon, has widespread appeal. This first edition card fetched $31,000 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021 at Heritage Auctions.

This first-edition Charizard card sold for $31,000 plus the buyer’s premium in April 2021 at Heritage Auctions.

NEW YORK — At any point in time, just about anything that is wildly popular with the younger generation can and does become collectible. Pokemon is said to be the biggest media franchise of all time, and its trading cards are one of the top-growing collector categories. With more than 800 Pokemon characters, the hugely popular cards are intended for use in a game where players battle against each other with the character-monsters shown on their cards. “Pokemon” translates to “pocket monsters,” and in the United States, the Pokemon franchise is advertised with the now-famous phrase, “Gotta catch ’em all!”

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