Former auction house owner Kruse released on bond

AUBURN, Ind. (AP) — Former auction house owner Dean V. Kruse has been released on bond after surrendering to face a theft charge out of Pennsylvania alleging that he never paid a man $38,000 for selling an antique hearse.

The Herald Republican of Angola reports Kruse was released Wednesday afternoon from the DeKalb County Jail in Auburn after posting $5,000 bond.

Kruse’s attorney, Margaret Grimm, had asked a DeKalb Superior Court judge to release Kruse on his own recognizance, calling him a “pillar of the community.” The judge agreed and set Kruse’s extradition hearing for Oct. 28.

A Pennsylvania court issued a warrant for Kruse’s arrest this week after prosecutors accused him of theft.

Last year, Indiana suspended Kruse’s auctioneer’s license and stripped his former auction house Kruse International of its license.

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Information from: Herald Republican, http://www.heraldrepublicanonline.com/

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

After the Civil War, Rogers’ scenes of army life proved popular with veterans. ‘Wounded to the Rear, One More Shot’ from 1864 offers a glimpse of courage under fire. A number of Civil Wars groups will be offered in the Sept. 10 sale at Fontaine’s Auction Gallery. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

Sculpture for the people: John Rogers 19th century genre

After the Civil War, Rogers’ scenes of army life proved popular with veterans. ‘Wounded to the Rear, One More Shot’ from 1864 offers a glimpse of courage under fire. A number of Civil Wars groups will be offered in the Sept. 10 sale at Fontaine’s Auction Gallery. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

After the Civil War, Rogers’ scenes of army life proved popular with veterans. ‘Wounded to the Rear, One More Shot’ from 1864 offers a glimpse of courage under fire. A number of Civil Wars groups will be offered in the Sept. 10 sale at Fontaine’s Auction Gallery. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

John Rogers (1829-1904) was that rarest of all phenomena, a successful artist. He sold over 80,000 sculptural compositions, mass-produced in painted plaster, during the second half of the 19th century. While only the wealthiest families could afford marble or bronze works of art, middle class households could purchase a graceful “Rogers Group” for $10 or $15.

More people became aware of fashions in home décor through the new medium of photography. Books appeared with recommendations for tasteful interior design. The accompanying photos of parlors and dining rooms always included sculpture—large or small—carefully arranged on pedestals, mantels and sideboards.

Born in Salem, Mass., Rogers’ skill as an artist emerged when he was working as a mechanic and draftsman in his twenties. He had begun modeling in clay and was further inspired by the sculpture he saw at an international exposition in 1853. Following the course of many aspiring artists, he set sail for study in Paris in 1858.

While studying abroad, he realized that neoclassicism was not his style. When he returned to the United States the following year, he began to achieve success by producing genre scenes from everyday life, a specialty he would make his own.

The genre tradition in painting had been established by artists such as William Sidney Mount and George Caleb Bingham. An excellent sculptor, Rogers was able to produce the same effect in three-dimensional figural groups. In 1863, he was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design where he often exhibited his compositions.

The New-York Historical Society has organized a traveling exhibition, “John Rogers: American Stories,” which includes many pieces from their permanent collection. The exhibition is on display at the Dixon Gallery & Gardens in Memphis through Oct. 9. The final venue will be in New York City at the newly renovated New-York Historical Society building Oct. 19, 2012 through Feb. 17, 2013.

Collectors will enjoy the wealth of information provided by the accompanying catalog, which features a timeline of the artist’s career. In the opening essay, Michael Leja writes, “The middle decades of the 19th century marked a watershed in the development of a mass market for images in the United States, and Rogers was more influential than any of his contemporaries in bringing sculpture into this new marketplace.”

“He was, in other words, a key player in the invention of a mass visual culture, and his oeuvre reveals the technical and aesthetic challenges entailed in this momentous remaking of art. To our present vantage, when the hyperproduction and instrumentalization of images continue to rise to new levels, Rogers’ career presents an illuminating historical case study.”

Roger’s subject matter is often sentimental or humorous, as was often the case with Victorian art works. In a popular group from 1875 – Checkers Up at the Farm – a young man laughs as he beats an older relative at the game, while a young mother and child look on. Consumers would recognize the familiar scene and take it home with a smile.

Rogers also reproduced scenes from Shakespeare and popular fiction of the day. Courtship in Sleepy Hollow: Ichabod Crane and Katrina Van Tassel dates to 1868. You are a Spirit, I Know; When did you Die? is a four-figure group from King Lear made in 1885.

The beginning of Rogers’ career coincided with the Civil War years, and the artist from the North was a staunch Abolitionist. Many of the groups simply recorded daily life on the front – The Picket Guard of 1861 or Wounded to the Rear: One More Shot from 1864 – and were popular with veterans and their families.

Other themes had more political overtones. An 1868 photo of the parlor of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s home in Galena, Ill., contains two Rogers Groups. The Council of War depicting Grant at President Lincoln’s side stands near the window. On the mantel is a family composition titled Union Refugees (1863) which shows a young couple and their child fleeing the South because of their loyalty to the Union.

Today, Rogers is particularly celebrated for his accurate and heroic depictions of African-Americans in the war years. One of the artist’s earliest groups, The Slave Market of 1859 shows a defiant black father being sold apart from his grieving family.

The most groundbreaking group, however, is Wounded Scout: A Friend in the Swamp (1864), which presents a black freedman helping a wounded soldier through difficult terrain. Modern eyes, accustomed to multicultural sculptures, such as The Soldiers by Frederick Hart at the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., may not realize how radical the Rogers’ image was in its day.

Ellen Daugherty, associate professor at the Memphis College of Art, recently lectured in conjunction with the traveling exhibition. She said, “The thing that Rogers does so well is create a little moment, a visual anecdote in time. He tells some of the story and you’re allowed as the viewer to weave the rest of it, to decide how to complete the narrative. He opens up his potential audience rather than shutting them down.”

Daugherty is an expert on the portrayal of African-Americans in 19th and early 20th century art. In discussing the Wounded Scout, she noted, “Any type of art that depicts the humanity of African-Americans at this time period is rare. This black man is kind, helpful, and someone the wounded soldier can lean on in times of trouble.”

“The thing that makes it quite powerful is the touch – the way that Rogers puts the two figures together. The black man holds the soldier’s arm so tenderly; he exhibits characteristics of nobility, humanity and concern for his fellow man.”

Collectors can still find affordable examples of Rogers’ “Sculpture for the People” for sale in the antiques marketplace. Fontaine’s Auction Gallery in Pittsfield, Mass., will offer a one-owner collection from the South of about 55 groups in their Sept. 10 sale. Among the lots offered will be Civil War themes such as The Council of War and Union Refugees, theater scenes, and depictions of home life.

Jim O’Brien at Fontaines says, “It is wonderful for us to have the opportunity to sell such a large and diverse collection. We typically only see two or three groupings in the course of a year; so to see many of the rarer groupings all at once is a treasure.”

“Rogers’ studio in New Canaan, Conn., has been designated a National Historic Landmark. John Rogers is credited with being a pioneer in the making of elastic molds for works of art. He patented many of his works, displaying the dates on the base of the sculptures.”

O’Brien adds, “Rogers’ sculptures are very popular among collectors. When looking at any given piece, you can really get a feel for what life was like in the 1800s. The realistic qualities of his works are amazing; Rogers was an expert in not only duplicating realistic features of his subjects, but he also was a master at capturing movement and intimate scenarios in everyday life.”

Starting bids on the Fontaine lots start as low as $200. Note that condition affects value for the easily damaged plaster groups. Rogers also made durable master bronzes to use as his models. Many of these are included in the New-York Historical Society exhibition, but they rarely appear on the market.

Certain groups were copied by 19th-century English potteries in Parian porcelain. These were apparently not authorized by Rogers, but they are attractive and often bring four-figure prices at auction.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


‘Wounded Scout, A Friend in the Swamp’ from 1863 was one of the first representations of a common humanity which transcends racial divisions. The bronze sculpture is on the catalog cover of ‘John Rogers: American Stories,’ a traveling exhibition organized by the New-York Historical Society. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

‘Wounded Scout, A Friend in the Swamp’ from 1863 was one of the first representations of a common humanity which transcends racial divisions. The bronze sculpture is on the catalog cover of ‘John Rogers: American Stories,’ a traveling exhibition organized by the New-York Historical Society. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

Rogers was well-known for his gently humorous genre scenes from daily life. Two of his best-selling groups were ‘Checkers Up at the Farm’ (1875) and the two men playing ‘Chess’ (1889) shown here. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

Rogers was well-known for his gently humorous genre scenes from daily life. Two of his best-selling groups were ‘Checkers Up at the Farm’ (1875) and the two men playing ‘Chess’ (1889) shown here. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

‘The Council of War,’ an 1868 group with President Lincoln flanked by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, was a popular subject. Rogers produced multiple plaster editions from a master bronze. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society. Courtesy New-York Historical Society.

‘The Council of War,’ an 1868 group with President Lincoln flanked by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, was a popular subject. Rogers produced multiple plaster editions from a master bronze. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society. Courtesy New-York Historical Society.

‘Uncle Ned’s School,’ designed in 1866, depicts a black workman and young relatives learning to read, a skill denied to slaves before emancipation. An edition of this design is part of the collection offered at Fontaine’s. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

‘Uncle Ned’s School,’ designed in 1866, depicts a black workman and young relatives learning to read, a skill denied to slaves before emancipation. An edition of this design is part of the collection offered at Fontaine’s. Image courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

Painting by Atbat, one of the three members of the Art Official Flavor crew. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

Reading the Streets: Keeley Gallery pop-up show

Painting by Atbat, one of the three members of the Art Official Flavor crew. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

Painting by Atbat, one of the three members of the Art Official Flavor crew. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

NEW YORK – It was only a one-night event, but Auction Central News didn’t want you to miss the results of the Art Official Flavor’s pop-up show at the Keeley Gallery in the Bowery. On Friday, from 7-11pm, people dropped by the space to check out new visuals by Gouch, Atbat, and Bucket, otherwise known as Art Official Flavor—three Brooklynites whose projects integrate the mediums of web, signage, street and fine art. The increasingly popular phenomenon of the “Pop-up” show pairs especially well with the genre, as it reflects the same impermanent temperament of street art in its original habitat—the urban outdoors, where a tag might last one night or indefinitely. The pieces included in the show were brightly colored and cleanly executed, with several light-hearted collages that incorporated everything from a newspaper clipping of Patrick Swayze to a rubber chicken.

Ryan Keeley, the owner of the gallery, also uses the shows he hosts to his own advantage. A fine and commercial artist who has done marketing campaigns for clients like Red Bull, Ryan’s gallery adjoins his own workspace. The pop-up show gives him exposure—his work is visible, albeit restricted, through a door blocked off by a police barrier. Ryan says the gallery gives him a welcome excuse to mingle with the artistic community and that hanging other artists so near his own studio provides him with inspiration.

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Gouch’s “My Fame is” pieces. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

Gouch’s “My Fame is” pieces. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

A police barrier doesn’t keep us from viewing Ryan Keeley’s recent projects. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

A police barrier doesn’t keep us from viewing Ryan Keeley’s recent projects. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

All three members of Art Official Flavor contributed to this collage. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

All three members of Art Official Flavor contributed to this collage. Photo by Kelsey Savage Hays.

 

Night shot of the architectural model of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Image courtesy of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Read more: https://www.liveauctioneers.com/news/index.php/component/content/article/55-museums/5162-walmart-donates-20m-to-crystal-bridges-museum-to-sponsor-admission#ixzz1Wcn1mZij

Crystal Bridges art museum to host job fair

Night shot of the architectural model of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Image courtesy of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Read more: https://www.liveauctioneers.com/news/index.php/component/content/article/55-museums/5162-walmart-donates-20m-to-crystal-bridges-museum-to-sponsor-admission#ixzz1Wcn1mZij

Night shot of the architectural model of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Image courtesy of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Read more: https://www.liveauctioneers.com/news/index.php/component/content/article/55-museums/5162-walmart-donates-20m-to-crystal-bridges-museum-to-sponsor-admission#ixzz1Wcn1mZij

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is hosting a job fair in advance of its scheduled November opening in Bentonville.

The event is set for Thursday, with two sessions. One is from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and the other is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The fair will be held at the Shewmaker Center for Workforce Technologies at Northwest Arkansas Community College on southeast Eagle Way.

The museum, which is projected to be a major tourism draw for northwest Arkansas, is seeking applicants for security, restaurant and guest services positions.

The new museum, set to open Nov. 11, is looking to recruit applicants for security, restaurant and guest services positions.

No advance registration is necessary to take part in the job fair.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-30-11 0905GMT

 

Logo for Mallard Fillmore by cartoonist Bruce Tinsley. Mallard Fillmore if one of the comic strips whose creators will be participating in a special 9/11 tribute. Fair use of a copyrighted logo for which no free equivalent exists; used to illustrate an article directly related to Mallard Fillmore, among other comic strips. Title panel taken from a Sunday strip posted at Seattle-Post Intelligencer's website, saved on hard drive, cropped using MS Paint, and saved again as a GIF file. The image is placed in the infobox at the top of the article discussing Mallard Fillmore, a subject of public interest.

Cartoonists plan Sept. 11 anniversary tribute

Logo for Mallard Fillmore by cartoonist Bruce Tinsley. Mallard Fillmore if one of the comic strips whose creators will be participating in a special 9/11 tribute. Fair use of a copyrighted logo for which no free equivalent exists; used to illustrate an article directly related to Mallard Fillmore, among other comic strips. Title panel taken from a Sunday strip posted at Seattle-Post Intelligencer's website, saved on hard drive, cropped using MS Paint, and saved again as a GIF file. The image is placed in the infobox at the top of the article discussing Mallard Fillmore, a subject of public interest.

Logo for Mallard Fillmore by cartoonist Bruce Tinsley. Mallard Fillmore if one of the comic strips whose creators will be participating in a special 9/11 tribute. Fair use of a copyrighted logo for which no free equivalent exists; used to illustrate an article directly related to Mallard Fillmore, among other comic strips. Title panel taken from a Sunday strip posted at Seattle-Post Intelligencer’s website, saved on hard drive, cropped using MS Paint, and saved again as a GIF file. The image is placed in the infobox at the top of the article discussing Mallard Fillmore, a subject of public interest.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Sept. 11 is etched in the memories of millions, and as the 10th anniversary nears, cartoonists are etching their thoughts and emotions about 9/11 into comic strips.

With the anniversary falling on a Sunday, more than 90 cartoonists with five different syndicates have banded together to dedicate their strips on Sept. 11 to those whose lives were lost in the attacks. Sept. 11-themed strips will appear from the writers and artists of “Family Circus,” ”Mallard Fillmore,” “Candorville,” “Doonesbury” and “Pluggers,” among others.

Jeff Keane, who co-authors “The Family Circus,” was immediately sold on the idea when approached by King Features, his syndicate.

“I knew that it was something that I think would work for ‘Family Circus’ if I could find the approach for it,” he told The Associated Press. “Because ‘Family Circus’ is more of a realistic look at family, and I don’t necessarily have a cartoon that is a ‘joke a day,’ but more sentimental and more emotional, it was easier for me to look at it that way.”

Jim Borgman, the co-creator of “Zits” with Jerry Scott, about a permanent teenager and his parents, called the upcoming anniversary something that cannot be ignored.

“As a cartoonist we would have all been wondering ‘Is it OK to deal with this topic in our work?’ Of course you can, but there is something comforting about the thought that a bunch of us are going to be struggling to say something on that day,” he said. “My colleagues — cartoonists — are an astonishingly varied and talented group of people. I fully expect we’ll see a broad range of approaches that day.”

It’s not the first time that cartoonists have banded together. Previous efforts have included topics like Earth Day or breast cancer awareness. But the scope of this endeavor is unprecedented, with five syndicates and the newspapers they serve participating: King Features, Creators Syndicate, Tribune Media Services, Universal Press Syndicate and Washington Post Writers Group — and the strips they provide to newspapers participating. The artists produce the strips independently.

The comics, each produced independently by the artists, will be featured in a separate, full-color pullout section and online the same day at www.cartoonistsremember911.com. Afterward, exhibits on the strips are planned for the Newseum in Washington, San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum, the Toonseum in Pittsburgh and the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art in New York.

The tone of the strips are varied, said Brendan Burford, comics editor at King Features Syndicate, with some taking a sentimental tack, while others may try to make a reader laugh.

“After 9/11, the cartoonists organized and did a series of message strips around Thanksgiving Weekend … but it was also reflective and sympathetic to everyone who suffered,” he said.

“So 10 years later, a good number of those cartoonists already understood what the message needed to be,” Burford said. “Some are taking the ‘it’s OK to laugh,’ and others are taking the “it’s OK to heal” path.

And it being Sunday, that gives the 93 cartoonists ample space to write, draw and be read.

Borgman and Scott said their strip will look at the anniversary through teenager Jeremy’s eyes.

“Jerry Scott and I tried to think about what Sept. 11, 2001, would mean to a person who is now 16 years old — put aside the fact that Jeremy has been 15 or 16 for 13 years now,” he said.

Tony Rubino, who writes “Daddy’s Home,” was living in Washington on Sept. 11 and has been involved with Jeremy’s Heroes, a charity founded on behalf of Jeremy Glick, one of the passengers killed aboard Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa.

His strip for Sept. 11, which is drawn by Gary Markstein, drew inspiration from the passengers of Flight 93, whose actions helped bring the United Airlines flight down in a Pennsylvania field instead of its likely target, the White House or the U.S. Capitol.

“I went by their example and rather than reflect on something that was negative in the past, I thought ‘What is the future? What I’ve done, my particular strip for 9/11 this year, is a look forward rather than a look back,” he said.

Rubino said that the cartoonists’ efforts are bound to be noticed, even among the din of anniversary coverage and programming.

“The comics are different. I think it’s a chance for people to see a perspective on this anniversary that they wouldn’t see otherwise,” he said. “They’re going to get a million television programs, but this is a unique way of looking at it.”

Matt Moore can be followed on Twitter by searching (at)MattMooreAP.

On the Net:

bit.ly/ocaPXP

Chinese bronze standing Buddha, 24 1/4 inches: $102,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Cowan’s inaugural Asian art auction totals $1.1M

Chinese bronze standing Buddha, 24 1/4 inches: $102,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Chinese bronze standing Buddha, 24 1/4 inches: $102,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s first auction dedicated solely to Asian art was a huge success with sales totaling $1.1 million for the two-day sale Aug. 26-27.

President and principal auctioneer Wes Cowan and staff could not be happier.

“We are delighted with the results of our first Asian art auction. It validated for us the strength of the market for quality Asian antiques. This was a learning experience and believe me, we learned a lot,” said Cowan.

The auction was featured 796 lots. Over the two days 2,115 bidders participated from 15 countries. Of the winning bidders, 73 percent bid online and 11 percent bid on the floor in Cowan’s salesroom; the percentage of absentee and phone winning-bidders tied at 8 percent each.  Of the lots sold, 37.5 percent sold over estimate. The top lot was a Chinese bronze standing Buddha that came in at a whopping $102,000 (with buyer’s premium).

Graydon Sikes, specialist of Fine Art at Cowan’s, commented, “There were lots of surprises—big expensive ones.”

The sale included a wide selection of ivory, jade and porcelain, prints, Chinese furniture, scroll paintings, and reference material. Highlights of the sale included a Sino-Tibetan bronze Buddha, a pair of Chinese white jade pendants, a Chinese Republic period ivory wrist rest with carved polychrome insects, a Chinese carved jade duck seated on a lotus flower, a Japanese cloisonné vase, Chinese carved ivory vases on stands and a gilt bronze Buddha.

The sale’s highest selling lot was a Chinese bronze standing Buddha, which brought $102,000, sixty-eight times its estimate of $1,000/$1,500. It is a bronze of a Buddha, with traces of gilt and dark red paint, standing on a lotus flower.

A Chinese Republic Period ivory wrist rest with polychrome insects sold for $47,000, over twice its estimate of $15,000/$20,000. This carved double wrist rest, when closed, takes the form of a bamboo shaft.

Two Chinese white jade pendants realized $49,938, over an estimate of $300/$500. The lot comprised two carved white jade pendants; the first a rectangular pendant with one side carved with a horse with two riders talking to two men in a cart, and the other side with calligraphy. The other pendant is carved with a bird and flowers in a basket.

A Sino-Tibetan bronze Buddha sold for $54,000—more than 13 times its estimate of $2,000/$4,000. Of Sino-Tibetan origin, this is a finely cast bronze Buddha with red and blue decoration, atop a lotus base.

A Chinese carved jade duck seated on a lotus flower hammered down at $46,800, 78 times its estimate of $400/$600. Of the 20th-century or earlier, this is a finely carved jade of a duck sitting on top of a transparent and thinly carved lotus flower.

A Japanese cloisonné vase brought $19,200, over 38 times its estimate of $300/$500. Of the early 20th century, this cloisonné vase has pink and white floral decoration on a blue background, with a one-character mark stamped on the bottom, along with a U.S. Customs sticker.

A lot of Chinese carved ivory vases on stands realized $8,400, over 33 times its estimate of $150/$250. The carved ivory vases on stands each show a dragon relief carving.

A gilt bronze Buddha hammered down at $20,400, 29 times its estimate of $500/$700. Sino-Tibetan, this gilt bronze Buddha is seated in dhyanasana on a double lotus flower, his hair in tight curls covering the domed ushnisha above, with an urna on the forehead and long pierced earlobes.

To learn more about Cowan’s visit the company’s website at www.cowans.com or call 513-871-1670.

 

 

altClick here to view the fully illustrated catalogs for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Chinese Republic Period ivory double wrist rest with carved polychrome insects inside, placed together sides for a bamboo shaft, 10 1/2 inches overall: $47,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Chinese Republic Period ivory double wrist rest with carved polychrome insects inside, placed together sides for a bamboo shaft, 10 1/2 inches overall: $47,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

 

Two Chinese white jade pendants, the larger 2 inches long: $49,937.50. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Two Chinese white jade pendants, the larger 2 inches long: $49,937.50. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

 

Sino-Tibetan bronze Buddha, 15 1/2 inches:  $54,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Sino-Tibetan bronze Buddha, 15 1/2 inches: $54,000. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

 

Chinese carved jade duck seated on a lotus flower, 4 3/4 inches long: $46,800. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Chinese carved jade duck seated on a lotus flower, 4 3/4 inches long: $46,800. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

 

Japanese cloisonné vase, 16 inches: $19,200. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Japanese cloisonné vase, 16 inches: $19,200. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

 

Pair of Chinese carved ivory vases on stands, each 7 inches including stands: $8,400. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Pair of Chinese carved ivory vases on stands, each 7 inches including stands: $8,400. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

 

Sino-Tibetan gilt bronze Buddha, 6 1/2 inches: $20,400. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

Sino-Tibetan gilt bronze Buddha, 6 1/2 inches: $20,400. Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions.

River arts crawl to showcase downtown Granite Falls

GRANITE FALLS, Minn. (AP) – A new event showcasing downtown Granite Falls will kick off the eighth annual Meander Upper Minnesota River Arts Crawl.

The event aims to highlight Granite Falls as a gateway to the Upper Minnesota River Valley. It will be held Friday, Sept. 30, from 4-8 p.m.

The meander is a self-guided tour of 33 artist studios in western Minnesota. The weekend routinely draws thousands of visitors.

Event coordinator Nicole Zempel says Granite Falls has four arts studios and two others close to town.

Activities include a walking tour of downtown Granite Falls led by members of the town’s Historical Society. Musicians will be playing on main street throughout the evening, and a ceremony will be held at the Historic Foot Bridge that spans the Minnesota River.

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Online:

www.cureriver.org

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-30-11 0904GMT

 

Arrest warrant issued for former auctioneer Dean Kruse

AUBURN, Ind. (AP) — Northeastern Indiana officials have issued an arrest warrant for embattled former auction house owner Dean V. Kruse, who’s faced years of legal battles over his business practices.

DeKalb County officials tell The Journal Gazette of Fort Wayne they’re looking for the 69-year-old auctioneer.

The newspaper reports Pennsylvania court records show Kruse was charged Monday with felony theft by failure to make required disposition of funds received.

Indiana suspended Kruse’s auctioneer’s license last year and he’s been sued repeatedly in recent years for business practices that include not releasing funds to vehicle consignors or vehicle titles to purchasers.

Kruse’s former Auburn-based auction house Kruse International was stripped of its license last year by the Indiana Auctioneer Commission.

A message seeking comment was left Tuesday for the DeKalb County sheriff.

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Information from: The Journal Gazette, http://www.journalgazette.net

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Stuart Ashman, former Secretary New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Image courtesy of New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.

Ex-NM cabinet secretary named to art museum post

Stuart Ashman, former Secretary New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Image courtesy of New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.

Stuart Ashman, former Secretary New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Image courtesy of New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) – Former New Mexico Cultural Affairs Secretary Stuart Ashman has been named to the top post at an art museum in California.

The Museum of Latin American Art announced Ashman’s appointment last week as president and CEO. The museum is in Long Beach, Calif.

Ashman was cabinet secretary for the Cultural Affairs Department during former Gov. Bill Richardson’s administration, and ran the state’s network of museum and monuments.

Before becoming the department’s top administrator, Ashman directed the New Mexico Museum of Art, founded and directed the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and served as director and curator of the Governor’s Gallery in the state Capitol.

After leaving state government when the Richardson administration ended last year, Ashman was a Peace Corps adviser on arts-related initiatives in Latin American counties.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-29-11 0904GMT

 

18K Breguet Type XX Transatlantique Chronograph. Estimate $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Leighton Galleries to auction jewelry collection Sept. 15

18K Breguet Type XX Transatlantique Chronograph. Estimate $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

18K Breguet Type XX Transatlantique Chronograph. Estimate $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

UPPER SADDLE RIVER, N.J. – Leighton’s Sept. 15 auction will feature one of the finest jewelry collections they’ve ever assembled, with a real emphasis on quality. Immediately following their Premier Book Auction that starts at 5 p.m. Leighton will launch right into the 123 lots of fine jewels and timepieces at about 6:30 p.m. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.com.

The sale offers an exciting assortment of men’s and women’s timepieces, rings, brooches, pendants, necklaces and bracelets set in diamonds, rubies, emeralds and sapphires, as well as semiprecious jewels, natural pearls, heavy gold pieces and more, all from local estates and all for sale to the highest bidder.

Featured timepieces include an 18K Breguet Type XX Transatlantique Chronograph (est. $10,000-$15,000), rare Corum Bubble XL Jolly Roger Chronograph (est. $5,000-$7,000), Corum Bubble wristwatch (est. $4,000-$6,000), Audemars Piquet 18K and stainless Chronograph (est. $3,000-$4,000), 18K Corum Symbiose Ventrella wristwatch (est. $3,000-$5,000), Panerai Monte Carlo 01 Limited Edition Luminor Marina automatic watch (est. $4,000-$6,000), lady’s diamond Bucherer Pathos Square Midi wristwatch (est. $2,500-$3,500), Corum automatic Admirals Cup Chronograph watch (est. $1,500-$2,000), Corum automatic 18K man’s stainless wristwatch (est. $1,500-$2,000), man’s Rolex Oyster perpetual watch (est. $1,000-$1,500) and more.

Elegant jewels highlights include a diamond tennis bracelet and earring set, 14.4CTW (est. $7,000-$9,000), pearl and yellow diamond bracelet by Arthur King, 3.2CTW, (est. $5,000-$7,000), yellow and white diamond pendant, 6.5CTW (est. $5,000-$7,000), pair of diamond cluster earrings, 6.7CTW (est. $4,000-$6,000), emerald and diamond ring, 9.7CTW (est. $3,000-$5,000), diamond and ruby bangle, 6.0CTW (est. $2,500-$3,500), sapphire and a man’s diamond ring, 2.6CTW (est. $2,000-$3,000), alexandrite and diamond ring, 2.2CTW (est. $1,500-$2,500), diamond cocktail ring, 1.6CTW (est. $800-$1,200), man’s diamond, 1.8CTW (est. $800-$1,200).

More affordable examples include a ruby and diamond cocktail ring (est. $500-$700), diamond and sapphire cocktail ring (est. $400-600), free-form pearl and sapphire brooch (est. $300-$400), dinner ring with citrine-colored stone (est. $500-$700), rose-form pin with ruby accents, retro dinner ring with amethyst-color stone (est. $300-$350), emerald and seed pearl ring (est. $200-$250), marquise dinner ring with topaz-color stone (est. $200-$300), and a ring with large amethyst-color stone, ruby-accented floral pin (est. $200-$300).

For lovers of heavy gold pieces, the sale will offer an Italian yellow and white gold fancy link necklace (est. $1,700-$1,900), anchor link necklace and bracelet set (est. $1,600-$1,700), wide link bracelet (est. $1,500-$1,700), fancy link necklace (est. $1,200-$1,500), fancy link bracelet (est. $1,200-$1,400), two Italian chain link necklaces (est. $1,000-$1,200 each), and a charm bracelet (est. $400-$500).

Rounding out the jewelry lots for the evening, Leighton will also offer a large opal and diamond pendant, 1.20CTW (est. $2,000-$3,000), diamond and platinum ring, 2.25CTW (est. $1,800-$2,400), diamond engagement ring, 1.25CT (est. $1,800-$2,400), a gem-set 14K gold link wristwatch (est. $1,500-$2,000), 10K heavy gold wide mesh bracelet (est. $1,100-$1,300), diamond and seed pearl bangle, .80CTW (est. $800-$1,000), diamond loop-design hinged bangle, 1.50CTW (est. $800-$1,200), sapphire flower brooch by Tiffany (est. $500-$700), and a French gold and enameled portrait brooch (est. $500-$700).

The auction is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 15 at 5 p.m. It will be held at the Knights of Columbus Banquet Hall at 79 Pascack Road, Washington Township (Bergen County), N.J. Previews are scheduled for Wednesday, Sept.14, from 5-8 p.m., and on Thursday, Sept. 15, from 1-4 p.m. An illustrated web-based catalog is available at www.LeightonGalleries.com. For details email info@Leightongalleries.com or call 201-327-8800.

 

altView the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Rare Corum Bubble XL Jolly Roger Chronograph. Estimate $5,000-$7,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Rare Corum Bubble XL Jolly Roger Chronograph. Estimate $5,000-$7,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Pearl and Yellow Diamond Bracelet, by Arthur King. Estimate $5,000-$7,000.

Pearl and Yellow Diamond Bracelet, by Arthur King. Estimate $5,000-$7,000.

Diamond Tennis Bracelet and Earring Set, 14.44CTW. Estimate $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Diamond Tennis Bracelet and Earring Set, 14.44CTW. Estimate $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Emerald and Diamond Ring, 9.76CTW. Estimate $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Emerald and Diamond Ring, 9.76CTW. Estimate $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Audemars Piguet 18k & Stainless Chronograph Watch. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Audemars Piguet 18k & Stainless Chronograph Watch. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Diamond And Platinum Ring, 2.25CTW. Estimate $1,800-$2,400. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.

Diamond And Platinum Ring, 2.25CTW. Estimate $1,800-$2,400. Image courtesy of Leighton Galleries.