The main gate at the former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. Aug. 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon a k a Lito Sheppard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Poland earmarks funds for Auschwitz memorial

The main gate at the former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. Aug. 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon a k a Lito Sheppard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

The main gate at the former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. Aug. 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon a k a Lito Sheppard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

WARSAW, Poland (AP) – Poland’s government has earmarked funds to improve accessibility to the Auschwitz Nazi death camp memorial for visitors and to develop educational programs about the notorious Holocaust site.

At a session on Tuesday, the government of Prime Minister Donald Tusk pledged almost 34 million zlotys ($12 million) to local authorities to be spent between 2012 and 2015 on developing access roads leading to the museum and other infrastructure.

The money also would be spent on teaching undergraduate students about human rights, international relations and peace initiatives.

Nazi Germans who occupied Poland during World War II killed more than 1 million people in 1940-45 at Auschwitz and nearby Birkenau. Most of the victims were Jewish.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The main gate at the former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. Aug. 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon a k a Lito Sheppard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

The main gate at the former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. Aug. 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon a k a Lito Sheppard, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Naked performance art on Wall Street ends in arrests

NEW YORK (AP) — Some artists got naked on Wall Street during a performance art piece — and then they got arrested.

The two men and a woman were arrested on charges of disorderly conduct Monday morning outside the New York Stock Exchange.

Manhattan artist Zefrey Throwell organized the 5-minute social critique of Wall Street with dozens of volunteers acting like people at work. He says he didn’t intend to provoke police and his target was U.S. and world financial institutions.

Among those arrested was Brooklyn personal trainer and performance artist Eric Clinton Anderson, who played a naked janitor outside the stock exchange’s heavily guarded front door. He jokes, “Somebody needs to clean up Wall Street.”

Arrested with Anderson were another Brooklyn man and a Queens woman. Police say they created a public disturbance.

On the Net:

Artist Zefrey Throwell: http://www.zefrey.com/

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

The state seal of Mississippi. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

20-star U.S. flag to be restored for Miss. bicentennial

The state seal of Mississippi. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The state seal of Mississippi. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – An effort is under way to raise $50,000 to preserve a historic U.S. flag that marked Mississippi’s entrance into the nation.

Officials with the Mississippi Department of Archives and History say the flag flew over the young country only in 1818, the year after Mississippi became the 20th state.

MDAH officials say the rare 20-star flag is one of only a handful known to exist.

Officials say the flag was discovered in an antique shop in Massachusetts and acquired by MDAH in 2001. The flag was owned by a Captain Weston of Marshfield, Mass., and flew on one of his ships.

Once restored, the flag will travel for Mississippi’s bicentennial celebration and the opening of the new Museum of Mississippi History, where it will be on permanent display.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-02-11 0804GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The state seal of Mississippi. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The state seal of Mississippi. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters logo. PRNewsFoto/International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Washington, DC.

Sotheby’s picketers issue statement

International Brotherhood of Teamsters logo. PRNewsFoto/International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Washington, DC.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters logo. PRNewsFoto/International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Washington, DC.

NEW YORK (PRNewswire-USNewswire) – Members of Teamsters Local 814, the union that has been picketing Sotheby’s since the auction company’s lock-out of more than 40 union art handlers, are speaking out about what they view as an injustice.

In a press release issued by Teamsters Local 814, the union cites Sotheby’s “wildly successful year with gross profits topping $680 million” and says that in spite of it all, the company “[demanded] they take major concessions.”

“In place of the experienced staff of Teamsters Local 814 members, Sotheby’s will have temporary replacement workers handling the valuable paintings and sculptures of some of the wealthiest collectors in the world,” the release goes on to say.

“It’s hard to believe,” said shop steward David Martinez. “We contributed to the company’s success, and now they want to slash full-time jobs and replace us with non-union, temporary positions.”

“It seems to me that they are putting the whole operation at risk,” said Local 814 President Jason Ide. “Putting multimillion-dollar works in the hands of a temporary crew is not a good idea.”

The press release said workers “were surprised to receive letters on Friday, July 29, telling them not to come to work on Monday, especially since Sotheby’s had made statements in the media promising to spend ‘as much time as necessary’ at the bargaining table to reach a fair agreement…Of course, not everyone at Sotheby’s is being asked to take a pay cut. CEO William Ruprecht’s compensation more than doubled in 2010, reaching almost $6 million.”

Sotheby’s chief rival, Christie’s, signed a four-year contract with Teamsters Local 814 in April that added full-time jobs.

Click here to read Auction Central News‘ previous coverage of this subject, which includes comment from Sotheby’s: http://acn.liveauctioneers.com/index.php/features/auction-houses/5181-art-handlers-picket-sothebys-over-contract-dispute

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Bruce Lee on a French poster for a 1982 rerelease of ‘Enter the Dragon.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Stephen Bennett Auctions.

Bruce Lee items to be sold at Hong Kong auction

Bruce Lee on a French poster for a 1982 rerelease of ‘Enter the Dragon.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Stephen Bennett Auctions.

Bruce Lee on a French poster for a 1982 rerelease of ‘Enter the Dragon.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Stephen Bennett Auctions.

HONG KONG (AFP) – Thirteen items belonging to the late kung fu legend Bruce Lee, including a 1966 letter he wrote and a fur-lined coat will go under the hammer in a Hong Kong auction Saturday, Aug. 6.

The sale, which could raise up to $112,900, is believed to be the largest-scale auction of his memorabilia in the southern Chinese city, where Lee was raised before moving to the United States in his late teens.

Items to be sold from his estate include a letter he wrote 45 years ago to a friend in which the martial arts specialist talked about the television series The Green Hornet, in which he played Kato, a confidant of the superhero.

“The item is meaningful in the sense that it can allow us to understand more about Bruce Lee’s views and what he thought about his work at that time,” Wong Yiu-keung, the Bruce Lee Fan Club chairman told the South China Morning Post.

Other items to be sold at the Aug. 6 auction include a dark-blue fur-lined coat which was made around 1973 for Lee’s film Game of Death, a membership card for his kung fu institute, and a name card of Lee.

The sale is jointly organized by auction houses America’s Kelleher Auctions and Phila China of Hong Kong. Bruce Lee Fan Club and Phila China could not be reached for immediate comment last weekend.

The Hong Kong government said last month that it has shelved a plan to turn Lee’s old home in the southern Chinese city—which which later became a rundown love hotel—into a museum, citing differences with the property owner.

Fans of the icon, who died in 1973 at the age of 32, have long called for a museum dedicated to Lee in the city.

Lee—credited with catapulting the martial arts film genre into the mainstream with films including Fists of Fury and the posthumously released Enter the Dragon—died after a severe reaction to medication.

 

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in January 2010. Image by Bob Doran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Schwarzenegger museum opens in his hometown

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in January 2010. Image by Bob Doran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in January 2010. Image by Bob Doran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

VIENNA (AFP) – The world’s first museum dedicated to former “Governator” and Mister Universe Arnold Schwarzenegger opened its doors Saturday in his birthplace of Thal in southern Austria.

The “Styrian Oak” himself was absent for the event, timed to coincide with Arnie’s 64th birthday, but will attend a grander opening at a later date, according to organizers.

Visitors, mostly locals, gathered for a first look at the two-story light yellow house in Thal in southern Styria, restored to look as it did when Schwarzenegger first came into the world on July 30, 1947.

Among the 1,000 objects and photos on display are his very first weights, with which the future champion bodybuilder started training, as well as the desk behind which he sat as California governor.

Monitors also recall Schwarzenegger’s Hollywood career, with trailers from his various films, while a life-size model of his “Terminator” stands in a corner.

When the man himself will visit his first home for the grand opening was still unclear but he was expected to bring with him a 10-foot-high bronze statue he commissioned from a U.S. artist to adorn the outside of the museum.

The former bodybuilder, actor and politician has sought to revive his film career since leaving the California governor’s office earlier this year, but has mostly made headlines lately over his divorce from Maria Shriver after admitting in May that he had fathered a child with the couple’s former housekeeper.

Barnes Foundation building in Lower Merion Township (Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, icensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Pa. judge hears arguments over moving Barnes Foundation

Barnes Foundation building in Lower Merion Township (Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, icensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Barnes Foundation building in Lower Merion Township (Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, icensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) — The Barnes Foundation’s new home is well under construction in Philadelphia but a long and bitter fight continues over whether the world-famous art collection should stay in its longtime suburban home.

Montgomery County Orphans’ Court Judge Stanley Ott presided over a packed two-hour hearing Monday afternoon on the ongoing Barnes saga. He approved the proceeding after a request from a citizens group that argued he didn’t have all the evidence when he approved the relocation in 2004.

The Friends of the Barnes Foundation, a group trying to halt the multibillion-dollar collection’s 5-mile move from suburban Lower Merion, said Ott was misled by the actions of the attorney general’s office, which has oversight over charitable trusts.

Samuel Stretton, an attorney representing the group, argued that then-Attorney General Mike Fisher, now a federal appeals judge, failed to serve as a neutral party and instead was “essentially a cheerleader” in facilitating the collection’s move by undermining and pressuring the Barnes’ controlling board of trustees to go along with the relocation.

Barnes Foundation attorney Ralph Wellington said Ott had determined years ago that the citizens group has no legal standing in the case. He also said their understanding of the attorney general’s responsibility in such legal matters is incorrect because Fisher’s role was not to be neutral but to act in Pennsylvanians’ best interest, which meant preventing the cash-strapped organization from closing or selling off its collection.

“It is baseless factually and filed by people who have no right to do so,” Wellington said of the opponents’ petition.

Dr. Albert C. Barnes, a pharmaceutical magnate, amassed a collection regarded as one of the world’s greatest private holdings of contemporary art, which includes 181 Renoirs, 69 Cezannes, 60 Matisses, 44 Picassos and thousands of other objects.

He established the Barnes Foundation in 1922 to teach populist methods of appreciating and evaluating art. He tightly grouped his paintings with antique ironwork, furniture and African sculpture to illustrate universal aesthetic themes.

The trust of Barnes, a self-made millionaire who died in a 1951 car crash at age 78, stipulated that his trove of 800 impressionist and postimpressionist masterpieces “remain in exactly the places they are” after his death and gave control of his foundation to Lincoln University, a historically black school in nearby Chester County.

Barnes Foundation officials first asked Ott’s permission in 2002 to relocate near Philadelphia’s museums and cultural attractions. The foundation said its endowment was exhausted and it would go bankrupt if required to remain in Lower Merion, where it was subject to restrictive township zoning regulations severely limiting the number of visitors.

The Pew Charitable Trusts, The Lenfest Foundation and The Annenberg Foundation promised to help the Barnes raise $150 million for a new gallery and an endowment when the relocation to Philadelphia was approved. In exchange, Lincoln University ceded control of the foundation’s board of trustees and permitted its new benefactors to appoint their own members.

The Barnes galleries closed in July. The new building is scheduled to open next year on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, near the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rodin Museum.

Ott did not say when he would issue a ruling on the latest petition, but attorneys said they expect it could take about a month.

On the Net:

Barnes Foundation: www.barnesfoundation.org

Friends of the Barnes: www.www.barnesfriends.org

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Barnes Foundation building in Lower Merion Township (Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, icensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Barnes Foundation building in Lower Merion Township (Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, icensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Church of the Saviour, one of many grand landmarks in Saint Petersburg. July 4, 2007 photo by Dionysus, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NY design firm wins Saint Petersburg island project

The Church of the Saviour, one of many grand landmarks in Saint Petersburg. July 4, 2007 photo by Dionysus, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Church of the Saviour, one of many grand landmarks in Saint Petersburg. July 4, 2007 photo by Dionysus, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

SAINT PETERSBURG, Russia (AFP) – A New York-based architectural firm was awarded a prestigious contract today from billionaire Roman Abramovich to design an island in Russia’s imperial capital Saint Petersburg.

The WORKac firm was announced the winner in a private tender organized by the Millhouse investment firm of the billionaire businessman that oversees the design of the New Holland project.

The 7.6-hectare (18.7-acre) New Holland island comprises prime land in the heart of Saint Petersburg and is only a short stroll from the famed Mariinsky opera and ballet theatre and the Neva River.

The island is cut off by the city’s rivers and canals. The disused site currently houses warehouses largely built by the navy in the 18th century.

New Holland Development said WORKac promised to develop the site into public park “whose topography transforms New Holland Island into an outdoor amphitheatre and performance space.”

It gave no time frame of when the project may be completed or the costs involved.

The Russian media spotted Abramovich and his partner Daria Zhukova on the island last month amid speculation that the couple planned to turn the site into Russia’s next chic celebrity nightspot.

Zhukova owns a gallery in Moscow and is one of the country’s most closely-watched trendsetters.

WORKac has been involved in various projects around New York City and in 2009 was honored at the White House as Finalist for a National Design Award.

New Holland was to have been rebuilt by British architect Sir Norman Foster in 2006, but his vision of a touristic and cultural complex was thwarted when the first consortium that won the tender went bankrupt.

The island was created in the 18th century through the construction of two canals and gains it name from its resemblance to areas in the similarly canal-filled Netherlands city of Amsterdam.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Church of the Saviour, one of many grand landmarks in Saint Petersburg. July 4, 2007 photo by Dionysus, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Church of the Saviour, one of many grand landmarks in Saint Petersburg. July 4, 2007 photo by Dionysus, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

This pair of wishbone chairs by Hans Wegner will be a highlight of the Modernism furniture offerings. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Clars to sell fine art, antiques, classic cars, Aug. 6-7

This pair of wishbone chairs by Hans Wegner will be a highlight of the Modernism furniture offerings. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

This pair of wishbone chairs by Hans Wegner will be a highlight of the Modernism furniture offerings. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

OAKLAND, Calif. – Following on the heels of Clars’ largest July sale in their history, the California company’s August auction is shaping up to be quite an impressive event, as well. The sale to be held Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 6-7, features an extensive selection of investment quality fine art, furnishings and decorative items and three exciting special collections.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Adding to the richness of this sale, a special classic car auction will be held at 10 a.m. Pacific on Sunday. The special classic car auction is the continuation of the first session of this sale that was conducted July 12. In this Part II, approximately 50 fine antique and classic cars will be offered. This special session will feature marvels of motordom to include a 1929 Cadillac Series 341-B Roadster, a 1924 Locomobile, a cool 1936 Auburn Speedster Replicar and a sleek red 1975 Corvette to name a few.

Also entering Part II, the continuation of the bankruptcy liquidation sale of a fine jewelry store in St. Helena, Calif., will be held during the Saturday session. Exceptional timepieces including a Patek Phillipe watch plus diamond and gem-laden gold, sterling and platinum jewelry will be offered.

Special collections that will be offered over the weekend is a wonderful treasury of Disney memorabilia, an interesting collection of early American stamps ranging from 1847 to 1939 and a large collection of John Wayne memorabilia. Proceeds from the John Wayne collection will go to the University of California in his honor.

The fine art category finds once again an exceptional selection of works by noted California painters. Paul Lauritz’s (California, 1899-1975) beautiful oil on board titled Afternoon Shadows will be offered, as will Family Dinner, a large oil on canvas by A.D.M Cooper (California, 1856-1924). George Bickerstaff (California, 1893-1954) will be represented by his oil on canvas Monterey Coast, as will Percy Gray (California, 1869-1952) with his watercolor on paper titled California Oak. And, classic to San Francisco style will be Imogen Cunningham’s (California, 1883-1976) 1967 gelatin silver print Posters on Haight Street, San Francisco.

Works by a number of other noted American and European artists will also be offered including etchings by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro and Louis Appian and several fine bronzes by Claudius Marioton and Russian sculpture Evgeni Evgenevich Lanceray.

Fine furnishing offerings will span the 19th and 20th centuries.

In the Modernism category will be a pair of Hans Wegner wishbone chairs and a Charles Eames-style six- panel screen.

From the Art Nouveau period will be an 1890 relief-carved banquet table, and from 1930s French design will be three stunning oak and stained glass doors.

Turning to Hollywood in the 1930s, a stunning Hollywood Regency mirrored suite including console and side table will be offered. Hollywood Regency furniture was a favorite of celebrities ranging from Joan Crawford to Nancy Reagan.

The decoratives category is impressive as well. Lalique art glass offerings will include The Mask and from Sevres, a beautiful porcelain centerpiece, circa 1860, will be offered. Pottery will include examples by Rookwood and studio art including Viola Frey.

Finally, the Asian category will again bring unexpected prices. Of particular note in this sale is a Chinese polychrome enameled porcelain plaque titled Immortal and Attendant, late Qing/Republic Period. In addition, a fine selection of Chinese ivory figural carvings and a selection of jade carvings and toggles will be offered.

Clars’ August Fine Art and Antiques Sale will be held on will be held Saturday, Aug. 6 starting at 9:30 a.m. and Sunday, Aug. 7, at 10 a.m. Previews for this sale will be Friday, Aug. 5, from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. and 9 a.m. each auction day and by special appointment. Bidding for Clars auctions is available in person, by phone, absentee and live online through www.liveauctioneers.com.

For details visit Clars’ website at www.clars.com or phone 888-339-7600.

Clars Auction Gallery is located at 5644 Telegraph Ave., Oakland, CA 94609.

For information on previewing the special classic car auction, please call Clars for locations and times.

 

altView the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This 1929 Cadillac Series 341-B Roadster will be one of the headliners at Clars Classic Car Auction on Sunday, Aug. 7. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

This 1929 Cadillac Series 341-B Roadster will be one of the headliners at Clars Classic Car Auction on Sunday, Aug. 7. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Afternoon Shadows by Paul Lauritz (California, 1899-1975) will be among the works by noted California artists to be offered. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Afternoon Shadows by Paul Lauritz (California, 1899-1975) will be among the works by noted California artists to be offered. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

A favorite of celebrities in the 1930s, this stunning Hollywood Regency mirrored suite epitomizes the style of that era. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

A favorite of celebrities in the 1930s, this stunning Hollywood Regency mirrored suite epitomizes the style of that era. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

This lovely plaque by Lalique titled ‘The Mask’ will be offered at Clars on Sunday, Aug. 7. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

This lovely plaque by Lalique titled ‘The Mask’ will be offered at Clars on Sunday, Aug. 7. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Of particular note in this sale is a Chinese polychrome enameled porcelain plaque titled ‘Immortal and Attendant,’ late Qing/Republic Period. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Of particular note in this sale is a Chinese polychrome enameled porcelain plaque titled ‘Immortal and Attendant,’ late Qing/Republic Period. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

The Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Vladsinger, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Philadelphia philanthropist Ruth Perelman dies at 90

The Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Vladsinger, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Vladsinger, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Ruth Perelman, who along with her philanthropist husband was a major donor to institutions in the city of Philadelphia, has died. She was 90.

Perelman died Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Her husband, Raymond Perelman, told The Associated Press that the couple had been married for 70 years after they met in Greensboro, N.C., where she was going to college and he was running a plant for his father.

In May, the University of Pennsylvania announced that the School of Medicine would be named after the couple following their donation of $225 million. The Ivy League university described the gift as the largest in its history.

The Perelmans have also given millions to other Philadelphia institutions such as the Kimmel Center and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.