'Zero' by Peter Max measures 67 inches square. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

Ro Gallery’s May 13 auction to feature Peter Max ‘Zero’

'Zero' by Peter Max measures 67 inches square. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

‘Zero’ by Peter Max measures 67 inches square. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. – A large Peter Max painting titled Zero is one of the prize pieces of modern and contemporary art at Ro Gallery’s auction Wednesday, May 13. The acrylic on canvas painting done in 1989 is expected to sell for $40,000-$50,000. It measures 60 by 60 inches. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

An Andy Warhol screenprint of Mick Jagger (FS II.138) has a $30,000-$35,000. The 1975 portrait was printed by Alexander Heinrici, New York, and published by Seabird Editions, London. The print, on Arches Aquarelle paper, measures 43 1/2 by 29 inches. It is signed and numbered in pen.

Jazz musician Miles Davis is the subject of a portrait by Raymond Howell (American, 1931-2002). The oil on canvas painting, 34 by 28 inches carries a $20,000-$25,000 estimate.

The musical theme continues with a bronze figure of The Bandoneon Player by Thierry Ligismond (American, 1950- ). The figure of a sailor playing the concertina-type instrument measures 26 by 27 by 14 inches. Created in 2005, the work carries a $30,000-$50,000 estimate.

Also, Mark Kostabi’s 1989 painting titled Lypsinka is estimated at $20,000-$25,000. The monochromatic oil on canvas painting measures 64 by 84 inches.

The public is invited to preview artworks through May 12t at Ro Gallery, 47-15 36th St., Long Island City. The Gallery is by appointment only; phone 800-8881063 or 718-937-0901. The 330-lot auction will begin Wednesday at noon Eastern.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Ro Gallery’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


An Andy Warhol screenprint of Mick Jagger is expected to reach $30,000-$35,000. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

An Andy Warhol screenprint of Mick Jagger is expected to reach $30,000-$35,000. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

Thierry Ligismond's 'The Bandoneon Player' is inscribed with the edition number: 1 of 8.

Thierry Ligismond’s ‘The Bandoneon Player’ is inscribed with the edition number: 1 of 8.

Mark Kostabi's 1989 painting 'Lypsinka' is 84 inches wide by 64 inches high. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

Mark Kostabi’s 1989 painting ‘Lypsinka’ is 84 inches wide by 64 inches high. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

Raymond Howell painted jazz great Miles Davis about 1980. Image courtesy Ro Gallery. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

Raymond Howell painted jazz great Miles Davis about 1980. Image courtesy Ro Gallery. Image courtesy Ro Gallery.

Israeli police bust Palestinians with ancient text

JERUSALEM (AP) – Undercover Israeli officers foiled an attempt by two Palestinian men to sell an ancient, valuable papyrus document on the black market, police said Wednesday.

The men were arrested at a Jerusalem hotel Tuesday after a sting operation lasting several weeks, police said. The 1,900-year-old Hebrew document, previously unknown and valued at millions of dollars, was rescued, and police showed it to reporters.

It was unclear where the two men obtained it, police and archaeologists said. Similar documents have been found in caves in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, where they have been preserved over the centuries by the dry climate, they said.

The most famous of those are the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient holy books and apocalyptic treatises thought to have been collected by an ascetic Jewish sect two millennia ago.

 

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Unrelated to a similar example stolen from Ed's Museum in Wykoff, Minn., this tinplate wind-up Merrymakers mouse band was produced by Marx around 1931. Photo courtesy LiveAuctioneers Archive and Old Barn Auction.

Antique toys stolen from Wykoff museum in Minnesota

Unrelated to a similar example stolen from Ed's Museum in Wykoff, Minn., this tinplate wind-up Merrymakers mouse band was produced by Marx around 1931. Photo courtesy LiveAuctioneers Archive and Old Barn Auction.

Unrelated to a similar example stolen from Ed’s Museum in Wykoff, Minn., this tinplate wind-up Merrymakers mouse band was produced by Marx around 1931. Photo courtesy LiveAuctioneers Archive and Old Barn Auction.

WYKOFF, Minn. (AP) – Several metal antique toys were stolen from Ed’s Museum in Wykoff, including a rare tin wind-up toy of a band of four mice.

The Fillmore County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the burglary, which happened sometime between April 28 and May 4.

The most valuable item was a Marx Merrymakers set in its original box. It was made in the late 1920s and consists of a band of four mice with a piano and two chairs. It’s worth about $1,000.

The museum houses thousands of antiques, from movie posters to grocery products such as Jack Sprat Gloss Starch from the 1950s.

Museum tour guide Esther Evers said she believes the stolen antiques might be sold through Internet sites and hopes people will also look for them at antique shows.

Sheriff’s deputies are investigating.

___

Information from: Post-Bulletin, http://www.postbulletin.com

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-05-07-09 1407EDT 

This cup and saucer by Royal Winton in the Marguerite pattern was sold recently by Columbia River Treasures at Rubylane.com for $35.

Kovels – Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 11, 2009

This cup and saucer by Royal Winton in the Marguerite pattern was sold recently by Columbia River Treasures at Rubylane.com for $35.

This cup and saucer by Royal Winton in the Marguerite pattern was sold recently by Columbia River Treasures at Rubylane.com for $35.

It’s spring, and the flowers are blooming. The fashion magazines say that overall-flower prints are the thing to wear this year. So why not “dress” your table in vintage flower-decorated dishes? From the 1920s to the late 1950s, chintz pattern dishes were the rage. Manufacturers made overall patterns featuring flowers of many colors. English porcelain companies like Carlton, Crown Devon, Crown Ducal, Royal Albert, Royal Winton and Shelley made most of the chintz. Tea sets, including plates, and luncheon sets were popular. Chintz patterns were meant for a garden party. They went out of style when the monotone decorating schemes of the mid-1950s came into fashion and plates were solid-colored or had minimal decoration. It was not until the 1990s that the chintz look came back. Flowery dishes were made again by English firms and some Asian factories. Original chintz is expensive today. A Royal Albert Rose cup and saucer costs $55, and an Old Cottage tray by Royal Winton sells for $65. Read more

From 1952, the earliest known Mickey Mantle game-used New York Yankees home jersey finished at the top of prices realized, earning $188,318.40.

Ruth, Mantle are MVPs in Grey Flannel’s $1.4 million sale

From 1952, the earliest known Mickey Mantle game-used New York Yankees home jersey finished at the top of prices realized, earning $188,318.40.

From 1952, the earliest known Mickey Mantle game-used New York Yankees home jersey finished at the top of prices realized, earning $188,318.40.

WESTHAMPTON BEACH, N.Y. – Fierce competition for unique and iconic professional sports memorabilia in Grey Flannel’s April 29 Summer Games auction kept phone lines and the Internet buzzing till the final bid was lodged around 5 a.m. the following day. “We were swamped,” said Grey Flannel president Richard E. Russek. “We knew we were going to have a good sale three days before it closed, because of all the inquiries and signups, and of course because there were some fantastic items offered.”

The final tally for the 854-lot auction was $1,418,046 (all prices quoted are inclusive of 20 percent buyer’s premium). As predicted, the two most highly publicized lots finished at the top of prices realized.

The earliest known Mickey Mantle game-used autographed home jersey, worn by the young Oklahoma phenom in his first years with the Yankees, took the blue ribbon with a closing bid of $188,318.40. Not far behind was a Babe Ruth bat from the 1926-1929 period, into which the legendary slugger had carved 11 notches to represent 11 home runs.

Babe Ruth's bat from the 1926-1929 period, into which he carved with 11notches to represent 11 home runs, slammed in a winning bid of $155,628.

Babe Ruth’s bat from the 1926-1929 period, into which he carved with 11notches to represent 11 home runs, slammed in a winning bid of $155,628.

Accompanied by painstakingly researched provenance, the bat crossed home plate at $155,628. Both the Mantle jersey and Ruth bat sold to private collectors.

A great surprise, said Russek, was the number of underbidders who had never before participated in a Grey Flannel auction. “There were many extremely important items in this sale, and they drew the true collectors out of the woodwork.” Read more

Dan Morphy, image courtesy Morphy Auctions LLC.

Dan Morphy buys back operating assets of Morphy Auctions

Dan Morphy, image courtesy Morphy Auctions LLC.

Dan Morphy, image courtesy Morphy Auctions LLC.

DENVER, Pa. (ACNI) – Four and a half years after selling the auction company he co-founded, Dan Morphy has come full circle and bought back the operating assets of Morphy Auctions from Geppi’s Entertainment. The Geppi family of companies is headed by Baltimore businessman Stephen A. Geppi. 

In a deal finalized on May 8, 2009, Dan Morphy assumes sole ownership of the company he established in 2004. The new firm will be known as Dan Morphy Auctions, LLC, with all current staff retained. 

The purchase package also includes the Adamstown Antique Gallery, the multi-dealer retail venue that serves as Morphy Auctions’ headquarters; and the semiannual event known as Morphy’s York Antique Toy Show. Both properties were part of the original sale to the Geppi companies in 2005.  
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Walter Johnson and George Sisler were among the first players inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

DuMouchelles presents all-star auction series May 15-17

Walter Johnson and George Sisler were among the first players inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Walter Johnson and George Sisler were among the first players inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

DETROIT – A weekend series of auctions beginning May 15 at DuMouchelles will lead off with a collection of baseball-related autographs, including a ball signed by Hall of Famers at the first induction ceremony in 1939. Additional autographs to be sold on the opening day include the Beatles and former U.S. presidents. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding. The auction will start Friday at 6:30 p.m.

While elections for the Baseball Hall of Fame began in 1936, the first induction at Cooperstown, N.Y., was not held until 1939. The living members of the Hall of Fame inaugural class consisting of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Cy Young, Walter Johnson, Tris Speaker, Eddie Collins, Larry Lajoie, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Connie Mack and George Sisler all signed the “Official Centennial League 1839-1939” baseball. It is dated June 12, 1939. DuMouchelles has set the estimate at $10,000-$15,000, however, a photograph of the inaugural class of Hall of Famers autographed by all but Cobb, sold at Sotheby’s in 1999 for $63,000.

Babe Ruth’s iconic autograph is on another team-signed baseball in the sale. This one commemorates the 1934 American League All-Star Team’s tour of Japan. Among the signatures on the “Davega Sports Liberty League” baseball is that of backup catcher Moe Berg, who was also a spy for the U.S. government. The ball has a $3,000-$5,000 estimate.

Baseballs autographed by presidents include one by John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy and another by Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. The Kennedy ball has an $800-$1,200 estimate, while the Clinton ball has a $200-$300 estimate. A baseball autographed by all four members of the Beatles carries a $1,000-$1,500 estimate.

The Beatles’ “White Album,” autographed by each member of the group above his picture on the inside cover has generated much interest. The lot, which also includes unsigned publicity prints of the band and both records, has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate.

Saturday’s sale will begin at 11 a.m. and include an 18th-century American highboy, probably New Hampshire. Standing 65 inches high and 39 inches wide, the two-piece maple highboy has a $12,000-$14,000 estimate.

Antiquarian books, art and decorative arts from several prominent Detroit area estates will cross the auction block Sunday, May 17, which begins at noon.

The auction will be conducted at the DuMouchelles galleries 409 E. Jefferson Ave. in Detroit. For information phone 313-963-6255. To view the fully illustrated catalogs for the DuMouchelles auction, or to sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet, click here:

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

 

Click here to view DuMouchelle’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Probably from New Hampshire, this two-piece highboy stands 65 inches high. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Probably from New Hampshire, this two-piece highboy stands 65 inches high. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Although Babe Ruth had played his last game with the New York Yankees, he created a sensation among Japanese baseball fans while playing on an all-star team in November 1934. Ruth and 17 teammates signed this ball. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Although Babe Ruth had played his last game with the New York Yankees, he created a sensation among Japanese baseball fans while playing on an all-star team in November 1934. Ruth and 17 teammates signed this ball. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

WJohn, Paul, George and Ringo all autographed the inside cover of the Beatles' ‘White Album' above their pictures. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

John, Paul, George and Ringo all autographed the inside cover of the Beatles’ ‘White Album’ above their pictures. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Hills Bros. promoted coffee sales with this early 1900s store display automaton. The 29-inch figure, which originally poured coffee from the pot to the cup, has a $2,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Hills Bros. promoted coffee sales with this early 1900s store display automaton. The 29-inch figure, which originally poured coffee from the pot to the cup, has a $2,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Lalique's  crystal ‘Paradoxe' figural group stands 20 inches high. It has a $13,000-$20,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

Lalique’s crystal ‘Paradoxe’ figural group stands 20 inches high. It has a $13,000-$20,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

This French marbletop commode is crafted in kingwood and mahogany and has a $3,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

This French marbletop commode is crafted in kingwood and mahogany and has a $3,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy DuMouchelles.

This drop-front oak desk is the famous Chautauqua model from Larkin. It was made around 1903.

Furniture Specific: The Family Story

This drop-front oak desk is the famous Chautauqua model from Larkin. It was made around 1903.

This drop-front oak desk is the famous Chautauqua model from Larkin. It was made around 1903.

When I was in junior high school, the hard-case English teacher who took pleasure in terrorizing all eight graders assigned us the daunting task of writing our autobiography. She provided an outline that dictated the construct of the document and she regularly checked on our individual progress to make sure we weren’t procrastinating on the job.

Early in the outline was the requirement to recite some family history – who we were and where and from whom we came. Easy enough. Just ask Mom and Dad since we had no other nearby relatives and long distance telephone calls were a luxury then. One of my parents had little to say on the subject and that was that. The other one told me the wonderful story of how my surname ancestors had been among the first settlers in Georgia, having been released from debtor’s prison in England to help colonize the New World in the expedition led by James Oglethorpe in the 1730s. Since there had been many generations of illiterate farmers in the family history there was little or no written family history so the story was all I had to go on and it suited me just fine to know that I was not some Johnny come lately just off the boat.

Years later, after a casual meeting with a distant relative who planted some tantalizing seeds of doubt, I became interested in my genealogy and learned how to do some serious research. Boy was I surprised! Turns out my surname was not that of my ancestors. It was an adopted named introduced into the family only a couple of generations earlier. My real ancestors did not help settle Georgia. In fact that side of the family only made it to Georgia in the 20th century. On the other hand they were among the earliest settlers in other parts of the country and the real story of the family history was at least as interesting and informative as the old family tale.

That has turned out to be true many times since then in encounters with readers and customers who have a piece of family furniture that has an interesting family history that proves the worth, sentimental, monetary or both, of the family treasure. Read more

The tag on this 1940s aloha shirt reads: 'Made in Hawaii.' Image courtesy Dirk Soulis Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Say ‘aloha’ to Hawaiian shirts again

The tag on this 1940s aloha shirt reads: 'Made in Hawaii.' Image courtesy Dirk Soulis Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

The tag on this 1940s aloha shirt reads: ‘Made in Hawaii.’ Image courtesy Dirk Soulis Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) – Spring is here, and that means the season has arrived for tropical print camp shirts, better known as Hawaiian shirts.

After a harsh winter, a change of attire can spark a change of attitude.

“The minute you put them on, you feel a little more relaxed,” said Doug Wood, chief operating officer of Seattle-based Tommy Bahama, one of the nation’s top sellers of upscale versions of Hawaiian shirts.

Hawaiian shirts have been riding one of their periodic waves of popularity in recent years, thanks to the influence of surfer chic. Despite their humble 1930s origins and iconoclastic image, Hawaiian shirts are a serious business and subject of academic study. And they are popular everywhere, said Linda Arthur, a textile professor at Washington State University in Pullman who has written several books about Aloha shirts, the preferred name among aficionados.

“The Aloha shirt has covered the globe,” Arthur said.

Aloha shirts were invented in the 1930s, when mom-and-pop tailors in Hawaii began making Western-style garments out of a common material, colorful Japanese kimono fabric. The shirts at first were sold to tourists, but eventually caught on with locals. Read more

Knickerbocker, known for its Raggedy Ann cloth dolls, made this famous Minnie Mouse. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.

Minnie Mouse is big cheese at Government Auction.com sale May 10

Knickerbocker, known for its Raggedy Ann cloth dolls, made this famous Minnie Mouse. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.

Knickerbocker, known for its Raggedy Ann cloth dolls, made this famous Minnie Mouse. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.

TEHACHAPI, Calif. – Antiques, fine art, estate jewelry and gold coins abound in an auction to be conducted Sunday, May 10, by GovernmentAuction.com. And anyone interested in investing in the American Dream, there are many parcels of land, the category that put GovernmentAuction.com, a private company, on the map. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

A scarce stuffed toy Minnie Mouse by Knickerbocker is expected to be among to top lots in the collectibles category. Except for staining on the face this 1930s cloth doll is in good condition and has a $3,000-$6,000 estimate. It has an old button pinned to one ear, but it has been there for a long time and may be removed.

Another valuable 1930s doll is a Topsy by the Gem Co. The dress contains the Topsy/Gem label. This black doll is in excellent condition, but missing one of her shoes.

Antiques will include a large Black Forest mantel clock that has its original movement. A stag tops the finely carved wooden case, which is 25 inches high. The clock has an estimate of $8,250-$16,500.

High interest gold coins include an 1868-S $2.5 U.S. Liberty Head-type, which has a $465-$930 estimate.

A 12.98-carat ruby and diamond ring in 14-karat gold is a stunner. GovernmentAuction.com uses retail replacement value appraisals for jewelry lots, and this ring has an estimate of $24,000-$48,400.

The auction will begin Sunday at 9 a.m. Pacific.

View the entire online catalog at LiveAuctioneers.com. For information call GovernmentAuction.com at 661-823-1543.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view GovernmentAuction.com’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Complete with original works, this Black Forest mantel clock stands 25 inches high. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.[/caption]
This ruby and diamond ring has a total carat weight of 12.98 carats. It is set in 14-karat gold. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.

This ruby and diamond ring has a total carat weight of 12.98 carats. It is set in 14-karat gold. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.

From the gold rush era comes this 1868-S $2.5 U.S. Liberty Head-type coin. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.

From the gold rush era comes this 1868-S $2.5 U.S. Liberty Head-type coin. Image courtesy GovernmentAuction.com.