American architect George D. Mason designed Detroit's Masonic Temple, which was dedicated in 1926. Image by Einar Einarsson Kvaran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Detroit’s Masonic Temple in foreclosure over taxes

American architect George D. Mason designed Detroit's Masonic Temple, which was dedicated in 1926. Image by Einar Einarsson Kvaran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

American architect George D. Mason designed Detroit’s Masonic Temple, which was dedicated in 1926. Image by Einar Einarsson Kvaran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

DETROIT (AP) – Detroit’s 14-story Masonic Temple could be sold at auction this fall after the prominent building went into foreclosure for a $152,000 tax bill, officials said.

The Masonic Temple is one of thousands of properties expected to be on the block in Wayne County’s September tax foreclosure auction, and bidding would start at $160,000, The Detroit News reported. Despite foreclosure, events at the facility continue.

David Szymanski, chief deputy treasurer, said his office hasn’t “heard from any party about this property,” so there are no plans to work out payments.

A message seeking comment from officials with the Masonic Temple was sent Thursday by The Associated Press.

The building, the largest Masonic Temple in the world, is on the National Register of Historic Places, takes up an entire block and has more than 1,000 rooms. It houses the Masonic Theater, a concert site for decades for some of the biggest acts in music, including The Who and the Rolling Stones.

The Masonic Temple now is in the hands of the county treasurer’s office. The default was triggered by unpaid 2010 property taxes, the newspaper said. Under state law, owners have time to catch up, but if they don’t, a court may order a foreclosure.

Before the building goes to auction, state, city and county governments would get a chance to buy it, Szymanski said. If there is no interest from any of the government agencies, the building would go to auction. Former owners could buy it back at auction.

Located north of downtown, the Masonic Temple is home to several masonic organizations. Construction on the Gothic structure began in 1920, and the temple was dedicated in 1926. It has ballrooms, dining rooms, a barbershop and even bowling lanes inside.

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Information from: The Detroit News, http://detnews.com/

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-25-13 1322GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


American architect George D. Mason designed Detroit's Masonic Temple, which was dedicated in 1926. Image by Einar Einarsson Kvaran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

American architect George D. Mason designed Detroit’s Masonic Temple, which was dedicated in 1926. Image by Einar Einarsson Kvaran. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Setting, Graf Zeppelin in 1928. consisting of cup, saucer and plate, Ätzgoldrand, with monogram‚ 'LZ,’ erklassig receive, marked on the bottom side, Heinrich Bavaria Selb ‚'Graf Zeppelin’ dated 1928. Gut Bernstorf image.

Gut Bernstorf marks milestone with 30th auction Apr. 27

Setting, Graf Zeppelin in 1928. consisting of cup, saucer and plate, Ätzgoldrand, with monogram‚ 'LZ,’ erklassig receive, marked on the bottom side, Heinrich Bavaria Selb ‚'Graf Zeppelin’ dated  1928. Gut Bernstorf image.

Setting, Graf Zeppelin in 1928. consisting of cup, saucer and plate, Ätzgoldrand, with monogram‚ ‘LZ,’ erklassig receive, marked on the bottom side, Heinrich Bavaria Selb ‚’Graf Zeppelin’ dated 1928. Gut Bernstorf image.

KRANZBERG, Germany – Gut Bernstorf is is celebrating a milestone with their 30th Art and Antiques auction Saturday, April 27, which starts at 1 p.m. Central European Time, 4 a.m. Pacific. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Among the highlights of this auction are a rare bracket clock from the 18th century and a highly collectible 14K pocket watch made by Paul Prüfer in Görlitz. High-quality and exclusive men’s and women’s wristwatches as well as an extensive range of valuable and elegant jewelry in mint condition will be offered for sale on behalf of a well-known jeweler, who is closing down his business.

Gut Bernstorf will offer paintings from famous names such as Heinrich von Zügel, the horse painter Hienl-Marre, Paul Hey, Julius Huether and Johann von Marées. There are many other interesting paintings representing all genres.

Lovers of good porcelain will also have ample objects to choose from. Porcelain manufactories such as Nymphenburg, Meissen, KPM and Herend are represented with a wide selection of affordable objects.

Bidding on zeppelin memorabilia will probably keep many collectors in suspense, especially when a three-piece coffee set with the monogram of Count Zeppelin from 1928 is called.

Also noteworthy is Gut Bernstorf’s selection of silver and various other categories in the sale—beautiful items and collectibles.

For details contact Michael Lehrberger; email auktion@gutbernstorf.de or phone +49-8166-993214.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Setting, Graf Zeppelin in 1928. consisting of cup, saucer and plate, Ätzgoldrand, with monogram‚ 'LZ,’ erklassig receive, marked on the bottom side, Heinrich Bavaria Selb ‚'Graf Zeppelin’ dated  1928. Gut Bernstorf image.

Setting, Graf Zeppelin in 1928. consisting of cup, saucer and plate, Ätzgoldrand, with monogram‚ ‘LZ,’ erklassig receive, marked on the bottom side, Heinrich Bavaria Selb ‚’Graf Zeppelin’ dated 1928. Gut Bernstorf image.

German bracket clock, fine finish, wood with brass applications, late 17th or early 18th century. Gut Bernstorf image.

German bracket clock, fine finish, wood with brass applications, late 17th or early 18th century. Gut Bernstorf image.

Bizer, Emil (Pforzheim 1881-1957 Badenweiler), 'Sitting, Female Nude,’ oil on paper, unsigned. Gut Bernstorf image.

Bizer, Emil (Pforzheim 1881-1957 Badenweiler), ‘Sitting, Female Nude,’ oil on paper, unsigned. Gut Bernstorf image.

Old Masters, 'Anna and Mary with Jesus,’ oil on wood, probably Italy, early 18th century. Gut Bernstorf image.

Old Masters, ‘Anna and Mary with Jesus,’ oil on wood, probably Italy, early 18th century. Gut Bernstorf image.

Coffee service for 10, Meissen, neuzeitilich (after 1934). Gut Bernstorf image.

Coffee service for 10, Meissen, neuzeitilich (after 1934). Gut Bernstorf image.

Dorner II, Johann Jakob (1775-1852) 'Romantic Riverside,' oil on wood. Gut Bernstorf image.

Dorner II, Johann Jakob (1775-1852) ‘Romantic Riverside,’ oil on wood. Gut Bernstorf image.

Selection of fine art glass including Tiffany, Quezal, Mueller, Baccarat and Schneider. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Hess Fine Auctions spring sale online event May 4

Selection of fine art glass including Tiffany, Quezal, Mueller, Baccarat and Schneider. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Selection of fine art glass including Tiffany, Quezal, Mueller, Baccarat and Schneider. Hess Fine Auctions image.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Hess Fine Auctions, the estate services division of Hess Fine Art Inc., has announced their Spring 2013 Estate Fine Arts & Design Auction will be held live online as a real time bidding event on LiveAuctioneers.com on Saturday, May 4, beginning at noon EDT, 9 a.m. Pacific.

The sale features noted collections of European Impressionist paintings, modern and contemporary works on paper by various artists from the estate of American artist and USF Professor Bradley Nickels, American and European Art Glass from an important New Jersey collection, original cartoon strip comic art from the estate of illustrator Bob Cordray sold on behalf of the Shasta Wildlife Rescue Foundation of California, Asian works of art and Orientalia, American antiques, Continental decorative arts and much more.

Highlights include a 19th century French salon portrait of a young woman with roses by Etienne-Aldolphe Piot and a pair of doré bronze cabinet sculptures from the Barbedienne foundry by Jean-Baptiste Auguste Clésinger. There are several Carder-era large examples of Steuben art glass as well as Tiffany, Baccarat, Imperial, Quezal, Schneider, Muller Freres, Legras, Salviati and Mary Gregory.

Among the Arts and Crafts Movement offerings are art pottery selections by Fulper and Rookwood together with a number of plein air oils by California artists. European Impressionism is represented by over 40 Scandinavian canvases from a central Florida collection.

Hot on the heels of their marathon two-session January Orientalia auctions, the gallery has been continually receiving additional Chinese and Japanese consignments including jade, ivory and ceramics that will be included in the auction.

The sale opens with an avant garde acrylic on paper by Wade Chandler from the collection of late American painter, printmaker and USF professor Bradley Nickels, one of many postwar examples from his private collection.

Hess Fine Auctions garnered considerable attention with their sale of animation art from the USF Mahan collection in December and the auction house’s relationship with the USF university community continues with the privately held Nickels Collection.

The gallery will be adding lots until sale time. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


 

French salon oil painting by Adolphe Piot (French, 1850-1910). Hess Fine Auctions image.

French salon oil painting by Adolphe Piot (French, 1850-1910). Hess Fine Auctions image.

Wade Chandler original, part of USF professor Bradley Nickels collection. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Wade Chandler original, part of USF professor Bradley Nickels collection. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Large Hugo Wilfred Pedersen beach seascape. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Large Hugo Wilfred Pedersen beach seascape. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Original cartoon comic art from the estate of Bob Cordray sold to benefit Shasta Wildlife Rescue of California. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Original cartoon comic art from the estate of Bob Cordray sold to benefit Shasta Wildlife Rescue of California. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Hand-carved jadeite Buddha relief amulet pendant from a selection of a selection of estate Orientalia. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Hand-carved jadeite Buddha relief amulet pendant from a selection of a selection of estate Orientalia. Hess Fine Auctions image.

Young emperor Kangxi of China at about age 20, before 1722. Painted by an unknown court painter. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Coimmons.

Historic Chinese silk scroll up for auction in France

Young emperor Kangxi of China at about age 20, before 1722. Painted by an unknown court painter. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Coimmons.

Young emperor Kangxi of China at about age 20, before 1722. Painted by an unknown court painter. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Coimmons.

BORDEAUX, France (AFP) — A section of a silk handscroll depicting a historically important trip by China’s longest-serving emperor is to go up for auction in France on Saturday.

Two other Chinese pieces from private French collections will also go under the hammer on that day as part of a sale hosted by auctioneers Alain Briscadieu.

The section of scroll on offer is part of the sixth in a celebrated series of 12 painted by the artist Wang Hui (1632-1717) to record a tour of inspection of southern China by the Emperor Kangxi.

Kangxi ruled from 1661-1722 and his trips to the south are seen as having helped consolidate Beijing’s rule over all of what constitutes modern China.

The fragment on sale here depicts landscapes, crowds, horsemen and boats and measures 2.5m x 0.68m. It is expected to sell for up to 200,000 euros ($260,000).

Chinese art expert Philippe Delalande said such handscrolls were often split up in the 1930s or ’40s after being imported by European merchants. At that time they were not nearly as sought-after as they are today, when a complete scroll would be likely to fetch up to 15 million euros.

Delalande said he was aware of two other sections of the scroll, one owned by a Chinese collector and one by another enthusiast in Phoenix, Ariz. “The whereabouts of the other pieces is a mystery,” he told AFP. “Everyone needs to have a good look through their attics.”

The other two prized items on sale are a Doucai porcelain plate from the Qianlong period (1736-1795) of the Qing dynasty which has the emperor’s stamp. “It is an exceptionally fine and large (50.7-cm-diameter) example of the period,” added Delalande. It is expected to sell for between 50,000 and 70,000 euros.

The third piece is a gilt bronze of a Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. It has been estimated at between 20,000 and 30,000 euros but could, according to Delalande, go for more than three times as much if there is significant interest from Chinese collectors.

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Edvard Munch, ‘Madonna,’ 1895 (printed 1912/1913), color lithograph and woodcut on golden japan paper. Image: 60.3 x 44 cm (23 3/4 x 17 5/16 in.), sheet: 66.2 x 50.4 cm (26 1/16 x 19 13/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Epstein Family Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Museum pays 150th birthday tribute to Edvard Munch

Edvard Munch, ‘Madonna,’ 1895 (printed 1912/1913), color lithograph and woodcut on golden japan paper. Image: 60.3 x 44 cm (23 3/4 x 17 5/16 in.), sheet: 66.2 x 50.4 cm (26 1/16 x 19 13/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Epstein Family Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Edvard Munch, ‘Madonna,’ 1895 (printed 1912/1913), color lithograph and woodcut on golden japan paper. Image: 60.3 x 44 cm (23 3/4 x 17 5/16 in.), sheet: 66.2 x 50.4 cm (26 1/16 x 19 13/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Epstein Family Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

WASHINGTON – The National Gallery of Art marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Edvard Munch, Norway’s most famed painter and printmaker, with an exhibition of more than 20 renowned works from the Gallery’s collection. On view from May 19 through July 28, on the ground floor of the West Building, “Edvard Munch: A 150th Anniversary Tribute” includes Geschrei (The Scream) (1895), The Madonna (1895), and a unique series of six variant impressions, Two Women on the Shore (1898).

“In recent decades the National Gallery of Art has presented three major exhibitions of Munch’s work, the last in 2010,” said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art. “We are pleased to bring together these stellar prints and drawings to celebrate this milestone.”

The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington. It is made possible by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Edvard Munch (Dec. 12, 1863–Jan. 23, 1944) both absorbed and influenced the work of innumerable artists throughout the world. He is today revered for his passionate visual expression of intense human experiences: “Art is your heart’s blood,” he said. His most famous image—a screaming figure, its eyes wide with horror—is an icon of anxiety, alienation and anguish. Attraction, love, jealousy and death were also recurring themes. His continual reworking of these subjects is commonly linked to Munch’s personal struggles. He made many telling portraits: tender visions of women and sensitive studies of lovers, children and adolescents. However, the real power of his art lies in his ability to extrapolate universal human experiences from his own life.

Raised in Oslo (then called Christiania), Munch studied at the Royal School of Design before a state scholarship enabled him to study in Paris in 1889. Printmaking was an essential component of Munch’s art for 50 years following his introduction to the graphic media in Berlin in 1894. With the capacity to produce multiple works from a single plate, stone, or woodblock, printmaking served to expand the accessibility of the artist’s themes to the general public and to provide income. Like his repeated revisions in paintings, prints also enabled him to experiment with his imagery; by altering color, line, texture and composition, Munch drastically changed the appearance and emotional impact of a given subject. Thus a woman kissing a man could appear amorous in one print and predatory in another. In many cases Munch continued to print impressions of his graphic works years after the creation of the original matrix.

The exhibition curator is Andrew Robison, Andrew W. Mellon senior curator of prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Edvard Munch, ‘Madonna,’ 1895 (printed 1912/1913), color lithograph and woodcut on golden japan paper. Image: 60.3 x 44 cm (23 3/4 x 17 5/16 in.), sheet: 66.2 x 50.4 cm (26 1/16 x 19 13/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Epstein Family Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Edvard Munch, ‘Madonna,’ 1895 (printed 1912/1913), color lithograph and woodcut on golden japan paper. Image: 60.3 x 44 cm (23 3/4 x 17 5/16 in.), sheet: 66.2 x 50.4 cm (26 1/16 x 19 13/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Epstein Family Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Edvard Munch, ‘Two Women on the Shore,’ 1898 (printed 1906/1907), color woodcut and color linoleum block. Image (irregular): 40.3 x 51.9 cm (15 7/8 x 20 7/16 in.), sheet: 47.4 x 59 cm (18 11/16 x 23 1/4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Print Purchase Fund (Rosenwald Collection) and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Edvard Munch, ‘Two Women on the Shore,’ 1898 (printed 1906/1907), color woodcut and color linoleum block. Image (irregular): 40.3 x 51.9 cm (15 7/8 x 20 7/16 in.), sheet: 47.4 x 59 cm (18 11/16 x 23 1/4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Print Purchase Fund (Rosenwald Collection) and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Edvard Munch, ‘Self-Portrait with Skeleton Arm,’ 1895, lithograph. Sheet: 45.6 x 31.5 cm (17 15/16 x 12 3/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

Edvard Munch, ‘Self-Portrait with Skeleton Arm,’ 1895, lithograph. Sheet: 45.6 x 31.5 cm (17 15/16 x 12 3/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection. © Munch Museum/Munch Ellingsen Group/ARS, NY 2013.

'The Hunters Enter the Woods (from the Unicorn Tapestries),' 1495–1505, South Netherlandish. Wool warp, wool, silk, silver, and gilt wefts. The yellow flowers, lanceolate leaves, and narrow seedpods of the wallflower are realistically depicted in the flowering meadow of this tapestry. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.1).

Met Museum, the Cloisters offer same-week ticket deal

'The Hunters Enter the Woods (from the Unicorn Tapestries),' 1495–1505, South Netherlandish. Wool warp, wool, silk, silver, and gilt wefts. The yellow flowers, lanceolate leaves, and narrow seedpods of the wallflower are realistically depicted in the flowering meadow of this tapestry. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.1).

‘The Hunters Enter the Woods (from the Unicorn Tapestries),’ 1495–1505, South Netherlandish. Wool warp, wool, silk, silver, and gilt wefts. The yellow flowers, lanceolate leaves, and narrow seedpods of the wallflower are realistically depicted in the flowering meadow of this tapestry. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.1).

NEW YORK – Beginning May 1, in celebration of the 75th-anniversary year of the Cloisters museum and gardens, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will offer same-week admission to The Cloisters for members of the public who visit the Metropolitan Museum’s main building first. Same-week combined admission is an enhancement and expansion of the same-day admission policy that has been in effect between the buildings for decades. A visitor with an admissions receipt from the Metropolitan Museum’s main building will be entitled to one additional admissions button to the Cloisters for up to seven days. The Cloisters—the Metropolitan’s branch museum dedicated to the art and architecture of the Middle Ages—is located in Fort Tryon Park, in northern Manhattan.

Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum, commented: “The Cloisters is an extraordinary place, just a quick subway, bus, or taxi ride away from midtown Manhattan. But we recognize that visiting the Met’s main building and The Cloisters in one day is ambitious; now our millions of visitors can enjoy both experiences in the course of a week and join in the celebration of this important anniversary year.”

The Cloisters museum and gardens features renowned works from the Metropolitan Museum’s world-famous collection of medieval art, including the famed Unicorn Tapestries and hundreds of examples of exquisite stained glass, metalwork, enamels, ivories, and paintings, all in a magnificent architectural setting along the Hudson River that evokes the Middle Ages. An integral part of the Cloisters and among its major attractions when it opened in 1938 and today, the gardens are planted in reconstructed Romanesque and Gothic cloisters.

Special offerings will include the exhibitions “Search for the Unicorn: An Exhibition in Honor of The Cloisters’ 75th Anniversary,” a presentation of unicorn imagery in various media (on view May 15–Aug. 18); “Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet,” a sound installation of the Tudor composition “Spem in alium” by Thomas Tallis in the Cloisters’ Fuentidueña Chapel with its 12th-century apse (Sept. 10–Dec. 8); and Canterbury Stained Glass, a display of Romanesque stained-glass panels from England’s Canterbury Cathedral (Feb. 25–May 18, 2014). Education programs include free regularly scheduled tours of the galleries and gardens, family programs on weekends, and a garden day in the summer. A highlight is the popular series of subscription concerts of medieval and Renaissance music in the spring and winter.

The Medieval Garden Enclosed, a regularly updated blog about the gardens at the Cloisters, has been featured on the website of the Metropolitan Museum since 2008 (http://blog.metmuseum.org/cloistersgardens/).

More information about the Cloisters and it 75-year history is available on the museum’s website at www.metmuseum.org/cloisters.

Follow the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Facebook.com/metmuseum, Twitter.com/metmuseum, and Instagram.com/metmuseum to join the conversation about the anniversary. Use #Cloisters75 on Twitter and Instagram.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


'The Hunters Enter the Woods (from the Unicorn Tapestries),' 1495–1505, South Netherlandish. Wool warp, wool, silk, silver, and gilt wefts. The yellow flowers, lanceolate leaves, and narrow seedpods of the wallflower are realistically depicted in the flowering meadow of this tapestry. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.1).

‘The Hunters Enter the Woods (from the Unicorn Tapestries),’ 1495–1505, South Netherlandish. Wool warp, wool, silk, silver, and gilt wefts. The yellow flowers, lanceolate leaves, and narrow seedpods of the wallflower are realistically depicted in the flowering meadow of this tapestry. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.1).

Salvador Dali masterpiece 'Persistence of Memory,' signed and numbered lithograph. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Wittlin & Serfer Auctioneers.

Salvador Dali restrospective moves on to Madrid

Salvador Dali masterpiece 'Persistence of Memory,' signed and numbered lithograph. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Wittlin & Serfer Auctioneers.

Salvador Dali masterpiece ‘Persistence of Memory,’ signed and numbered lithograph. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Wittlin & Serfer Auctioneers.

MADRID (AFP) – Madrid’s Reina Sofia Museum opens a major retrospective of works on Friday by Spanish surrealist artist Salvador Dali that explores how his experiments with painting, cinema and advertising have influenced art.

The exhibition features more than 200 paintings, sculptures, drawings, writings and television and film clips from the 1920s to the 1980s, including 30 works never before shown in Spain.

“We wanted to show the richness of Salvador Dali’s creation. We wanted to show the whole output of this artist, a complex, paradoxal and controversial personality,” said Jean-Michel Bouhours, one of the curators of the show.

Dali is praised by some as a creative genius for his striking and bizarre images. However his TV ad campaigns and media stunts, such as burying himself in banknotes, led some critics to dismiss the mustachioed artist’s work as little more than marketing.

The star attraction of the exhibition is Dali’s best-known painting, the 1931 The Persistence of Memory, which depicts melting pocket watches.

Dali said the painting, on loan to the exhibition from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, was inspired by watching camembert cheese liquefying in the sun.

While the show, which runs until Sept. 2, focuses on Dali’s paintings, also on display are photographs, films and even a Lanvin chocolate ad which aired on French TV in the 1960s.

“Dali is an interesting artist because he always shifts between a great respect for the traditions of the great masters and an insatiable desire for all that is new,” said Montse Aguer, another curator of the show.

“Dali lived in an era when painting was inexorably destined to lose ground to other art forms like photography, cinema and conceptual art, and he dabbled in all of these.”

Among the films on display is the 1929 silent short film Un Chien Andalou, written with Spanish director Luis Bunuel, with its notorious scene of a woman’s eye being slit by a razor.

Another is Destino, an animated short Dali made for the Walt Disney Co., which was only released in 2003.

The exhibition was staged earlier this year at the Pompidou Center modern art museum in Paris.

Dali died in his native Figueres in Catalonia in northeastern Spain in 1989 at the age of 85.

 

 

 

Benjamin Franklin marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1778. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Housekeeper pleads guilty to theft of Ben Franklin bust

Benjamin Franklin marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1778. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Benjamin Franklin marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1778. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) – A housekeeper has pleaded guilty in the theft of a Benjamin Franklin bust allegedly worth $3 million that was taken from a home in suburban Philadelphia.

Andrea Lawton, 47, of Mobile, Ala., was living in Philadelphia when the bust was stolen Aug. 24. She allegedly fled to Alabama with the bust, before she was arrested Sept. 21 getting off a Greyhound bus in Elkton, Md., where she had planned to sell the sculpture.

Lawton told investigators she stole the bust because she wanted to get the owner of the cleaning service for whom she worked fired. She said crews who cleaned the home had been told it was valuable.

The 25-pound bust is one of only four created by French artist Jean-Antoine Houdon and was made while Franklin visited Paris in 1778.

Lawton pleaded guilty to state burglary charges Monday. She already faces a federal prison sentence, having pleaded guilty in December to interstate transportation of stolen property. She will be sentenced on that charge May 20.

Common Pleas Judge Carolyn Carluccio did not immediately schedule sentencing on the state counts, saying she wants to know more about Lawton’s background.

The bust has been broken while in Lawton’s possession and is being repaired by a New York City museum.

“She broke a priceless piece of artwork that was made while Benjamin Franklin was still alive,” Montgomery County First Assistant District Attorney Kevin Steele said.

Steele said he’ll ask for a “significant” prison sentence because Lawton has refused to identify an alleged accomplice who actually entered the home and stole the sculpture at her direction. Also missing is $80,000 worth of memorabilia relating to composer Victor Herbert that Lawton has told police are still in the possession of her accomplice.

Michael John, Lawton’s defense attorney, said he’ll argue that any state court sentence be served concurrently with her federal sentence.

“This is all one event,” John said, adding that Lawton is remorseful and that her guilty pleas show she’s taking responsibility for her actions.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-23-13 1542GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Benjamin Franklin marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1778. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Benjamin Franklin marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1778. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Truman Capote's best seller 'In Cold Blood,' first edition. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Bloomsbury Auctions.

Kansas judge blocks use of ‘In Cold Blood’ files

Truman Capote's best seller 'In Cold Blood,' first edition. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Bloomsbury Auctions.

Truman Capote’s best seller ‘In Cold Blood,’ first edition. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Bloomsbury Auctions.

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) – A judge ruled Tuesday that investigation materials from the 1959 In Cold Blood murders kept by a Kansas Bureau of Investigation agent at home may not be auctioned off or publicly disclosed until he’s had a chance to review them.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendricks said the state could face “irreparable harm” if the materials found in Harold Nye’s home became public.

The materials include Nye’s personal journals, which mix notes from his KBI work with notes about personal matters, according to lawyers. The items also include copies of records and other materials about the investigation that inspired the Truman Capote Crime scene photos in his possession were returned to the state last year by his son.

Ronald Nye, of Oklahoma City, kept the other materials after his father’s 2003 death and gave them to Seattle memorabilia dealer Gary McAvoy to auction off. But the Kansas attorney general’s office contends the materials belong to the state, and it sued last year to get them back. Another hearing in the case is scheduled for November, to determine when it will go to trial.

Hendricks said his order will remain in place until the case is settled, but he left open the possibility that he could rescind it after reviewing the documents himself to determine how much private or previously undisclosed material they contain.

“Folks, I think I need to see them,” he said from the bench. “I need to look at them.”

McAvoy and Ronald Nye now say they don’t plan to auction off the materials, and instead plan to write their own book about the killing of Herb and Bonnie Clutter and two of their children at their remote farmhouse in Holcomb. Hendricks’ order bars them from even speaking about the files’ contents publicly.

The judge said the materials fall under the Kansas Open Records Act, which allows law enforcement agencies to close their investigation records but limits the circumstances.

Tai Vokins, an Olathe, Kan., attorney representing McAvoy and Ronald Nye, said they’ll gather the materials in dispute and turn them over to Hendricks, so that he can review them, in hopes of getting him to modify or rescind his order.

“I’m disappointed, but at the same time, I’m glad to get the guidance from the court,” Vokins said after the hearing.

The attorney general’s office sued McAvoy and his business; Ronald Nye and his sister, and Harold Nye’s widow, Joyce. Vokins said Joyce Nye died recently.

After the hearing, Schmidt issued a statement calling the judge’s decision “well-reasoned.”

“It is important for the KBI investigation materials to be returned to the state for the protection of the integrity of the records and out of respect for the Clutter family,” said Schmidt, who as attorney general appoints the KBI director.

Hendricks said the parties have raised numerous issues, such as whether Harold Nye acted improperly by keeping the materials at home and whether blocking their use violates Ronald Nye’s and McAvoy’s free speech rights. But he said the parties need to present more evidence on those questions.

In the meantime, the judge said if he allowed disclosure of the materials without seeing them first, “they’re out in the public” even if he later ruled the items should be returned to the state.

Two parolees, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith, were eventually convicted of killing the Clutters and were executed in 1965. Four years later, Harold Nye began a two-year stint as the KBI’s director.

The hunt for the family’s killers mesmerized the nation and drew journalists from throughout the U.S. to the small western Kansas town of Holcomb.

Hickock and Smith fled to Florida after the Kansas murders, and authorities in December exhumed their remains to test them for DNA in the hopes that it might help lead to a break in the unsolved killing of a Sarasota, Fla., family a few weeks after the Clutters’ deaths.

In Cold Blood, which takes the reader through the killings, the Hickock and Smith’s trial, and their execution is celebrated because it reads like a novel. However, scholars have long debated its accuracy.

Richard Adler, a forensic psychiatrist from Seattle, said the documents kept by Harold Nye are significant because Capote’s account of the Clutter case “may be inaccurate” in “pivotal ways.” Alder attended Tuesday’s hearing and said he’s reviewed some of the materials in question.

“The public would have great benefit in having access to them,” Adler said after the hearing. “This is a very celebrated case, and the general public’s understanding of the case stems from Truman Capote’s account.”

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Follow John Hanna on Twitter at http://twitter.com/apjdhanna

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-23-13 2332GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Truman Capote's best seller 'In Cold Blood,' first edition. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Bloomsbury Auctions.

Truman Capote’s best seller ‘In Cold Blood,’ first edition. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Bloomsbury Auctions.

Image courtesy of Fame Bureau.

Beach Boys cache being auctioned off by Fame Bureau

Image courtesy of Fame Bureau.

Image courtesy of Fame Bureau.

LONDON (AP) – The material sat in a Florida storage facility for many years, apparently forgotten, until the storage company finally sold it off in bulk because payments had not been made.

Only then did a buyer open the boxes and discover what is being dubbed “the lost archive” of the Beach Boys, one of America’s greatest and most commercially successful bands.

The collection of thousands of documents included what seems to be the band’s first royalty check, for $990, dozens of signed contracts, and handwritten and copied scores to Good Vibrations, California Girls and many other hits from their heyday in the 1960s.

Collectors dream of finding neglected treasure—that unblemished Ford Mustang convertible sitting in a garage since 1965—and the Beach Boys memorabilia certainly qualifies. It’s now in the hands of a group of investors seeking to sell the entire collection as one unit with the expectation that it will bring several million dollars.

“We thought it would be a crime to break it up,” said Ted Owen, who heads the Fame Bureau, the London-based firm handling the sealed-bid auction, which ends on May 15.

The collection is unique, he said, in part because the handwritten musical scores and lyrics showcase the arranging skills of Brian Wilson, widely recognized as the creative force behind the band’s success.

“What’s striking is just how creative and detailed it is,” Owen said. “You get the notes, then you move into the music sheets, he does the horn construction, the violin construction, you see the song development. This is right from the beginning—well thought out melodies, well thought out harmonies. It’s an inside view of the construction of songs, and his genius, really.”

There is no firm reserve price, but Owen said the “single sale” approach may be scrapped if bids don’t meet expectations.

The story of the collection’s provenance is somewhat convoluted. Owen said the material was apparently put in storage in the mid-1970s by a relative of a band member who felt it needed to be in a safe place. The cache included one box of about 15 Stetson hats the Beach Boys wore on stage during their hippie period.

When the storage payment bills went unpaid for a long stretch, the material was sold unopened to a buyer who apparently didn’t know what was inside, Owen said. That person eventually approached Owen for an estimate of its worth on the burgeoning rock memorabilia market. The material was then sold to the investors that own it now, he said.

The Beach Boys tried and failed to establish legal ownership of the archives, Owen said.

“It was ruled a fair find,” he said. “I’m selling it for a group that made an investment. The rights are 100 percent clear now.”

The Beach Boys are, understandably, less than enthusiastic about the sale of the material, which includes personal photos and letters, including an unusual shot of the late George Harrison with Mike Love, both sporting the long beards popular in the early 1970s.

“I can confirm that the band is aware of the auction,” Beach Boys representative Jay Jones said in an email. “The band will not be available for interviews in regards to this matter.”

The band is a shadow of its former self. Founding members Carl and Dennis Wilson are dead, and Brian Wilson, the sole survivor of the three brothers, has been embroiled in a series of divisive lawsuits with Love, another founder.

Brian Wilson suffered a prolonged mental collapse at the height of the band’s glory years, but has re-emerged as a successful solo performer in the last 20 years, although he often appears fragile in public.

There is little in the “lost archive” to foreshadow these legal problems and personal tragedies. While some lyrics in Brian Wilson’s handwriting are drenched in melancholia, most convey the band’s signature, sunny optimism.

“He wrote some of the best pop songs of all time,” said Neil Warnock, chief executive of The Agency Group Worldwide, a leading concert organizer.

“They were absolutely riveting two- and three-minute pop songs. The more serious stuff, Pet Sounds, resonates with every single generation as being a classic piece of music. He’s written a canon of music that is absolutely essential. He just thinks in five-part harmony.”

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-19-13 1117GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Image courtesy of Fame Bureau.

Image courtesy of Fame Bureau.