Tag Archive for: Polaroid

Rosamond Purcell, ‘Eye Made of Glass, Antler Bone, and Metal, Collection of Peter the Great, Kunstkamera, St. Petersburg, circa 1990. Inkjet print, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. © Rosamond Purcell

Rosamond Purcell career-spanning exhibition on view at Addison Gallery

Rosamond Purcell, ‘Eye Made of Glass, Antler Bone, and Metal, Collection of Peter the Great, Kunstkamera, St. Petersburg, circa 1990. Inkjet print, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. © Rosamond Purcell

Rosamond Purcell, ‘Eye Made of Glass, Antler Bone, and Metal, Collection of Peter the Great, Kunstkamera, St. Petersburg, circa 1990. Inkjet print, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. © Rosamond Purcell

ANDOVER, Mass. – Rosamond Purcell: Nature Stands Aside, the first retrospective of the artist’s work, is on view at the Addison Gallery of American Art through December 31. The exhibition will feature more than 150 of the artist’s haunting photographs, assemblages, collages and installations spanning Purcell’s career from the late 1960s to the present day.

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Polaroid photographs: instant gratification for collectors

Wearing a fright wig, Andy Warhol pioneered the art of the selfie in a Polaroid that brought $16,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2021 at Rago Arts and Auction Center. Image courtesy of Rago Arts and Auction Center and LiveAuctioneers.

Wearing a fright wig, Andy Warhol pioneered the art of the selfie in 1986 in a Polaroid that brought $16,000 plus the buyer’s premium in September 2021 at Rago Arts and Auction Center. Image courtesy of Rago Arts and Auction Center and LiveAuctioneers.

NEW YORK — Described as the Apple of its time, the Polaroid company gave the world instant photography. It was founded in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1937 by Edwin Land, who hit upon the notion of using a polarizing filter in cameras to cut down on light glare, an invention that produced photographs that did not require a darkroom and fully developed in mere minutes. Land called these filters Polaroids, and later, the public applied the name to the photographs themselves. Even after the advent of 35mm film, which produced crisper and higher-quality images, Polaroid fans preferred the instant film’s speedy results and distinctive look. After Polaroid phased out its early peel-apart instant films, users no longer needed to shake the image to help it dry faster, but the ritual lived on because it was fun.

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